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Full text of "Agenda"


San Francisco Public Library 



Government Information Center 

San Francisco Public Library 

100 Larkin Street, 5 th Floor 

San Francisco, CA 94102 



REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken from the library 



s f ac: January 16th 



Page 1 of 3 



San Francisco Arts Commission 



January 16th 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 
Wednesday, January 16, 2008 
3:00 p.m. 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 



Agenda 



7 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 



JAN 1 4 2008 

SAN FRANCISCO 
1. Consent PUBLIC LIBRARY 

1. Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to increase by an amount not to exceed 
$6,000.00 artists Packard Jennings and Steve Lambert's contract #DPAR08000046 for their Art on 
Market Street Program kiosk poster series and auxiliary programming for the printing of a catalog 
for a revised total contract amount not to exceed $17,000.00. 



2. Gallery Report 

Meg Shiftier 

PowerPoint presentation about the upcoming Gallery exhibition Make You Notice by Gallery 

Director Meg Shiffler. 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with Curator 
Patricia Maloney for her curatorial work on the Arts Commission gallery exhibition Make You 
Notice, for an amount not to exceed $5,100 

3. Patricia's Green 

Jill Manton 

Presentation by Hayes Valley Art Coalition (HVAC) for the upcoming temporary public art project 

Koilos Aeionic by the artist Michael Christian on Patricia's Green. 

Motion: Motion to approve the temporary installation of the sculpture Koilos Aeionic by the artist 
Michael Christian on Patricia's Green sponsored by the Hayes Valley Art Coalition for a period of 
six months pending approval from the Recreation and Parks Department 

4. Proposed Gifts to the City 

Susan Pontious 

A. MAYOR ADOLF SUTRO 

Report on aproposal from the United Humanitarian Mission for a 
memorial bust to former Mayor Adolf Sutro to be placed in City Hall 

B. Other proposed gifts. 

Motion: Motion to support the concept of placing a memorial bust to former Mayor Adolf Sutro in 
City Hall, pending Arts Commission approval of the design, the identification of an appropriate 
location in City Hall, and the raising of fund from private sources. 

5. Airport 

Susan Pontious 

Approval of Clare Rojas' proposal for boarding area G gate room wall. 

Motion: Motion to approve artist Clare Rojas' proposal for boarding are G gate room wall. 



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6. Rabbinoid Sculpture 

Jill Manton 

Report on relocation of Rabbinoid sculpture by Gerald Heffemon from Stern Grove to Esprit Park 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to relocate the Rabbinoid sculpture by 
Gerald Heffemon from Stern Grove to Esprit Park pending favorable response from community 
groups in surrounding vicinity. 

7. Third Street Light Rail Project-Metro East Facility 

Judy Moran 

Report on the final installation of two artworks on the facade of the new San Francisco Municipal 
Railway Metro East Vehicle Operations and Maintenance Facility at Illinois and Cesar Chavez 
Streets by artists Nobuho Nagasawa and Anita Margriil. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final installation of two artworks consisting of total of two 42 
insulated glass units installed in curtain walls on two stair towers on the facade of the new San 
Francisco Municipal Railway Metro East Vehicle Operations and Maintenance Facility at Illinois and 
Cesar Chavez Streets by artists Nobuho Nagasawa and Anita Margriil, and to accept the two 
artworks into the Civic Art Collection. 

8. Collections Report 

Carol Marie Daniels 
Staff Report 

Update on the vandalism to the Embarcadero Ribbon. 

9. Art on Market Street 
Judy Moran 

Update on the Art on Market Street Program 

Motion: Motion to approve the proposal by artist Owen Smith for the Art on Market Street 
Program in 2008 and to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with Owen 
Smith for the design of six original artworks and the printing of 24 kiosk poster reproductions, 
with auxiliary programming, for an amount not to exceed $18,000.00. 

10. Central Subway 

Jill Manton and Judy Moran 

Presentation about the status of the Central Subway Public Art Program 

11. Fillmore Street Bridge 
Jill Manton 

Report on Three Shades of Blue by artist Mildred Howard. Future Options and Considerations. 

12. Juri Commons 
Jill Manton 

Report on extension of the temporary public art project at Juri Commons and possible gift to the 
City of San Francisco 

13. Academy of Sciences 
Jill Manton 

Project Report 

3 1223 08817 4967 
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14. New Business 

15. Old Business 

16. Adjournment 

ES 1/11/2008 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts Commission office, 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during regular business hours. INFO: Ellen 
Shershow (415) 252-2594. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of the item. 

The ringing of and use of ceil phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic devices are 
prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the removal from the meeting of 
any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell phone, pager, or other similar sound- 
producing electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or administrative action 
may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San Francisco Campaign and Governmental 
Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register and report lobbying activity. For more information 
about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 
Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and website. 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. Commissions, 
boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct the people's business. This 
ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the people and that City operations are open 
to the people's review. For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report 
a violation of the ordinance, contact Adele Destro by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine Ordinance 
Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by phone at 415 
554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at sotf@sfgov.org. 

Citizens interested in obtaining a free copy of the Sunshine Ordinance can request a copy from Ms. 
Destro or by printing Chapter 67 of the San Francisco Administrative Code on the Internet, 
http://www.sfgov.org/sunshine/ 



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r.fac: January 16, 2008 Page 1 of 9 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

January 16, 2008 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 
Wednesday, January 16, 2008 

3:00 p.m. 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 



Minutes 



DOCUMENTS DEFT. 



Commissioners Present: 

Jeannene Przyblyski, Pop Zhao, Leonard Hunter, Lawrence Rinder JAN 3 1 20C8 

Absent: Dede Wilsey 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Staff Present: PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Mary Chou, Allison Cummings, Carol Marie Daniels, Nancy Gonchar, Jill Manton, Judy Moran, Susan 
Pontious, Ellen Shershow, Meg Shiffler 
/ Note: All votes are unanimous unless recorded otherwise. 

The meeting commenced at 3:02 p.m. 

1. Consent Calendar 

Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to increase, by an amount not to exceed 
$6,000, contract #DPAR08000046 with artists Packard Jennings and Steve Lambert for their Art 
on Market Street Program kiosk poster series and auxiliary programming. Additional funds are for 
the printing of a catalog. The revised total contract amount is not to exceed $17,000. 
Motion: Motion to adopt the consent calendar items 
Moved: Rinder/Zhao 

2. Gallery Report 

Gallery Director Meg Shiffler presented the upcoming gallery exhibition Make You Notice, March 
27 to May 24, 2008. This exhibition is being curated by guest curator Patricia Maloney. Ms. 
Maloney is currently the Associate Curator at Ampersand International Arts, San Francisco. She 
has organized and written for numerous exhibitions including The Searchers at White Box, New 
York; Close Calls 2006 at the Headlands Center for the Arts, Sausalito; Open Network: Brooklyn 
at Ampersand; and Firmament, which traveled to Immanence espace d'art contemporain in Paris 
and Turpentine Gallery in Reykjavik. Ms. Maloney has previously worked as a Curatorial Assistant 
for the Matrix Program at the University of California Berkeley Art Museum and at the Mori Art 
Museum in Tokyo, and as a Program Associate for the International Program of MoMA in New 
York. Currently, she is completing her MA in Theory and History of Contemporary Art at the San 
Francisco Art Institute. 

Ms. Shiffler went on to report that Make You Notice is an exhibition about four young women 
artists utilizing performance in their practice to examine issues of power and identity. 
Ms. Shiffler showed images of all four artists included in Make You Notice. Lisa Ann Auerbach's 
work encompasses knitting, bicycling, and the creation of various ephemera. Kate Gilmore builds 
structures out of various materials, then videos herself climbing on or squeezing her body through 
these precarious forms. Laura Swanson is a little person who is creating a new body of work for 
the exhibition that will feature images of her trying to disappear within the photographed 
environment. Jennifer Wofford builds elaborate narratives to assume different personas, such as a 
mail-order bride. 



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Ms. Shiffler added that there are a number of shows in the Bay Area exploring similar themes, 
creating a lively crossover dialogue between the Gallery and the other institutions in San 
Francisco 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with Curator 
Patricia Maloney for her curatorial work on the Arts Commission Gallery exhibition Make You 
Notice, for an amount not to exceed $5,100. 
Moved: Hunter/Rinder 

3. Patricia's Green 

Public Art Program Director Jill Manton stated that the Hayes Valley Art Coalition ("HVAC") has 
elected to place temporary public art on Patricia's Green in Hayes Valley. The Arts Commission 
has already placed a rich and successful series of temporary public art pieces on Patricia's Green; 
beginning with the Hayes Green Temple Project by artist David Best, followed by the Golden 
Gateway by artist Seyed Alavi, and most recently The Historic Miniature Golf Extravaganza by the 
artist team Wowhaus. 

Ms. Manton stated that HVAC had originally proposed a piece entitled The Trash Tea Temple, but 
that the cost of installation proved to be prohibitive. HVAC's current proposal is the temporary 
public art project Koilos Aeionic by artist Michael Christian. Ms. Manton introduced Russell 
Pritchard, co-founder of HVAC. 

Mr. Pritchard showed images of Koilos Aeionic, which was originally displayed at Burning Man. 
Koilos Aeionic is an oversized crouching figure. The figure is based on a human form, and seems 
ready to pounce or play. Conceptually, the figure reflects knowledge and wisdom. There is a light 
source in the head of the figure, and the artist has installed a solar power source so ho electrical 
connection is needed. 

Koilos Aeionic is constructed from a metal armature covered with metal cutouts, which have been 
sanded smooth for safety. The piece is twelve feet high by nineteen feet long and nine feet wide, 
and weighs approximately four hundred and fifty pounds. Installation will require a small forklift. 
Mr. Pritchard stated that HVAC feels that this piece is well-suited for Patricia's Green. Additionally, 
while future temporary installations will ideally rotate every four months, this first piece will 
remain for a period of six months. Mr. Christian will also attach explanatory signage to the piece 
itself. 

Ms. Manton stated that HVAC will obtain a permit from the Recreation and Parks Department, and 
will supply engineering drawings and insurance at that time. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that the Hayes Valley Community is impressive, and that she is 
eager to see the community embracing diversity in terms of their artist selections for future 
temporary art installations by going outside of the Black Rock Arts community. 

Motion: Motion to approve the temporary installation of the sculpture Koilos Aeionic by artist 
Michael Christian on Patricia's Green, sponsored by tne Hayes Valley Art Coalition for a period of 
six months pending approval from the Recreation and Parks Department. 
Moved: Rinder/Zhao 

4. Proposed Gifts to the City 

Public Art Program Deputy Director Susan Pontious reported on a proposal from Leonid Nakhodkin 
of the United Humanitarian Mission ("UHM"). Mr. Nakhodkin is proposing a memorial bust to 



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former Mayor Adolph Sutro to be placed in City Hall. Ms. Pontious stated that UHM does not yet 
have a design to present, but that they plan to approach the artist team of Daub Firmin 
Hendrickson, the artist team selected for the Harvey Milk memorial bust. Further, while UHM has 
a site within City Hall in mind for the bust of Mayor Sutro, the Arts Commission is aware that bust 
placement can be a sensitive subject. The Arts Commission has therefore suggested the City Hall 
Preservation Committee might wish to develop a master plan to accommodate future donations of 
commemorative busts. 

Ms. Pontious clarified that the motion for this item asks for approval of the concept of this project, 
pending approval of the design. Once UHM has a design proposal and a specific site is identified, 
the project will come back to the Visual Arts Committee. Ms. Pontious introduced Mr. Nakhodkin 
to the Committee. Mr. Nakhodkin expressed great pride in the opportunity to introduce this 
proposal to the Visual Arts Committee. 

He explained that Adolph Sutro was born in 1830, and arrived in the U.S. from Prussia in 1850. 
He became the first populist mayor of San Francisco, serving in office from 1894 to 1896. Mr. 
Nakhodin said that Mr. Sutro is today perhaps best remembered for the various San Francisco 
properties and landmarks that he purchased and developed, the best known being the Sutro 
Baths and the Cliff House. Mr. Nakhodkin stated that Adolph Sutro was one of the great citizens of 
San Francisco. 

There was some discussion regarding the current budget that UHM is proposing, and whether they 
will need to supplement this with additional funds. The Committee unanimously agreed that 
Adolph Sutro is an important person to commemorate, and thanked Mr. Nakhodkin and the United 
Humanitarian Mission for their generosity to the City. 

Ms. Pontious closed by stating that a second proposed gift to the City will be presented at the 
February Visual Arts Committee meeting. It is a proposal for a monument in honor of the Russian 
soldiers who fought in World War II, which the donors would like to place in Golden Gate Park. A 
staff report on this matter will be forthcoming. 

THIS MOTION HAS BEEN AMENDED 

Motion: Motion to support the concept of placing a memorial bust to former Mayor Adolph Sutro 

in City Hall, pending Arts Commission approval of the design, the identification of an appropriate 

location in City Hall, and the raising of funds for all project costs including the maintenance 

endowment. 

Moved: Hunter/Zhao 

5. Airport 

Public Art Program Deputy Director Susan Pontious reported on artist Clare Rojas' proposal for a 
Boarding Area G gateroom wall. Ms. Pontious showed the Committee a small painting by Ms. 
Rojas. She then reminded the Commissioners of Hung Liu's work, which is currently in fabrication 
at the San Francisco International Airport. Ms. Liu worked with Dan Farnsworth to have her 
images printed on wood panels for installation at the airport. Ms. Pontious thought that this seems 
an ideal route for Ms. Rojas' work as well. Ms. Rojas supports this solution. 

Motion: Motion to approve artist Clare Rojas' proposal for Boarding Area G gateroom wall. 
Moved: Rinder/Hunter 

6. Rabbinoid Sculpture 

Ms. Manton reported on the proposed relocation of the Rabbinoid sculpture by artist Gerald 
Heffemon from Stern Grove to Esprit Park. Ms. Manton reminded the Commissioners that the 



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Rabbinoid sculpture has been repeatedly damaged in its current location. It has sustained 
numerous graffiti incidents and recently had one toe broken off. Initially, staff felt it could be 
moved to a different location in the park, but have discovered that vandalism is rampant 
throughout Stern Grove and Pine Lake Park. Ms. Manton has been in extensive discussions with 
the Recreation and Park Department, and this has resulted in the current proposed move of the 
Rabbinoid from Stern Grove to Esprit Park in the Dogpatch neighborhood of San Francisco. 

Ms. Manton reported that Esprit Park is new, and it is in pristine condition. Though the park is 
often used by members of the community, there has not been a single incident of vandalism. She 
said that the artist has been consulted and is enthusiastic about the new site. Arts Commission 
staff will attend a community meeting in February to involve the community in this proposed 
move. The move wiil cost approximately three to four thousand dollars. 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to relocate the Rabbinoid sculpture by 
Gerald Heffernon from Stern Grove to Esprit Park pending favorable response from community 
groups in the surrounding vicinity. 
Moved: Hunter/Zhao 

7. Third Street Light Rail Project-Metro East Facility 

Project Manager Judy Moranreported on the final installation of two artworks on the facade of the 
new San Francisco Municipal Railway Metro East Vehicle Operations and Maintenance Facility at 
Illinois and Cesar Chavez Streets by artists Nobuho Nagasawa and Anita Margrill. 

Ms. Moran stated that this is the last phase of the new T-Third Street Light Rail project. She 
showed an image of the facility, which is scheduled to open in June, 2008. Ms. Moran explained 
that the artists designed and fabricated two curtain walis, each comprised of 21 insulated glass 
units, for two stair towers on the rear facade of the building. The artists were inspired by 100- 
year-old and 50-year-old mechanical blueprints. The Commissioners unanimously agreed that this 
is a very successful project and were thrilled to see it completed. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final installation of Blueprint, two curtain wall artworks, each 
consisting of a total of 21 insulated glass units, installed in two stair towers on the facade of the 
new San Francisco Municipal Railway Metro East Vehicle Operations and Maintenance Facility at 
Illinois and Cesar Chavez Streets by artists Nobuho Nagasawa and Anita Margrill, and to accept 
the two artworks into the Civic Art Collection. 
Moved: Rsnder/Hunter 

8. Collections Report 

Project Manager Carol Marie Daniels gave an update on the vandalism to the Embarcadero 
Ribbon, Ms. Daniels stated that she attended the Restitution hearing on December 20, 2007. 
Superior Court Judge Kathleen A. Kelly issued an Order for Restitution and Abstract of Judgment 
against the three defendants. The court ordered the defendants to pay $7,710.73 to the City. 
However, as the defendants do not have the funds to pay the judgment, it is unlikely that the Arts 
Commission wiil recover any money. Ms. Daniels has contacted San Francisco Deputy City 
Attorney Adine Varah, who advised Ms. Daniels that the City can enforce the court's Order of 
Restitution by bringing a civil suit against the defendants. Alternatively, a payment schedule may 
be set by the Adult Probation Department, given that restitution is a condition of the three 
defendants' probation. Ms. Varah will evaluate both options and inform staff of the best way to 
proceed by the February 20 Visual Arts Committee meeting. The fifty stolen skateblocks became 
the property of 850 Bryant Street at the time of the defendants' arrests, and will be released to 
the Department of Public Works ("DPW") Cement Shop. The skateblocks will remain at this 
location until the Arts Commission is ready to coordinate reinstallation. 



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9. Art on Market Street 

Project Manager Judy Moran reported on the Art on Market Street Program. Ms. Moran stated that 
over the past year, three projects were commissioned by the Art on Market Street Program under 
the umbrella theme of travel and urban systems. These included posters and related 
programmatic projects by Helena Keeffe, the artist team of Amanda Hughen and Jennifer 
Starkweather, and the artist team of Packard Jennings and Steve Lambert. Mr. Jennings and Mr. 
Lambert will participate in a panel discussion on Monday, February 4 at 7:00 p.m. The panel will 
take place at the California College of the Arts and is co-sponsored by the California College of the 
Arts Graduate Fine Arts Program and Livable City and will include urban planners and architects 
interviewed by Mr. Jennings and Mr. Lambert for this project. Ms. Moran thanked Commissioner 
Przyblyski and Commissioner Rinder for their help and support with this project. 

For the 2008 calendar year, Ms. Moran proposed the umbrella theme of the narrative, or 
storytelling. The first artist Ms. Moran presented under this theme was Owen Smith. Ms. Moran 
provided the Commissioners with copies of Mr. Smith's proposal, which gets its inspiration from 
mystery and detective fiction. Mr. Smith proposes to pay tribute to one of San Francisco's iconic 
authors of detective and mystery fiction, Dashiell Hammett, and the famous and infamous cast of 
memorable characters he created. Ms. Moran showed a selection of images Mr. Smith has already 
created towards this concept. The Commissioners responded favorably to this work, commenting 
that it seems an ideal context for Mr. Smith's unique style. 

Motion: Motion to approve the proposal by artist Owen Smith for the Art on Market Street 
Program in 2008 and to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with Owen 
Smith for the design of six original artworks and the printing of 24 kiosk poster reproductions, 
with auxiliary programming, for an amount not to exceed $18,000. 
Moved: Hunter/Zhao 

Ms. Moran reported on two additional artists for the Art on Market Street Program. Colter 
Jacobson creates drawings based on found photographs that he alters in subtle ways. Ms. Moran 
presented images of Mr. Jacobson's work, and stated that she was interested in asking him for a 
specific proposal for Market Street. Mr. Jacobson is currently in a group show entitled 
"Boomerang," which Ms. Moran encouraged the Commissioners to view. 

Lastly, Ms. Moran presented the artist team Rebar. Rebar often engages in temporary public 
installation and performance works. For example, they transformed a parking spot in downtown 
San Francisco into a mini-park for a day, laying down sod, a park bench, and a tree, and inviting 
passers-by to feed the meter and use the time to sit on the bench. 

The Commissioners enjoyed the theme of the narrative, and requested that the Art on Market 
Street Program maintain a diverse range of projects. 

10. Central Subway 

Project Manager Judy Moran and Public Art Program Director Jill Manton reported on the status of 
the Central Subway Public Art Program. Ms. Manton thanked the Commissioners for requesting 
this extensive report. She stated that Mona Tamari, the architect from Kwan Henmi 
Architecture/Planning, would give an overview of the current architectural design of the station 
interiors to indicate potential sites for artwork, and that Arts Commission staff would then show 
examples of existing Art in Transit public art projects, as well as reviewing the artists currently in 
the Central Subway pre-qualified artist pool. Ms. Moran added that an additional artist selection 
process was scheduled to begin in February. 



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Ms. Moran announced that the Arts Commission conducted the first community meeting in 
Chinatown, in conjunction with the Chinese Cultural Center and the Chinatown Community 
Development Center, and will conduct a second meeting in SOMA this February. Staff will continue 
to involve the community via meetings, website, and public outreach. 

During Ms. Tamari's presentation, she stated that the Central Subway is an extension of the T- 
Third Street Light Rail. Under the current proposal, there will be three underground stations 
added: Chinatown, Union Square, and Moscone. All three stations will have three distinct sections: 
the entrance at the top level, pay stations at the middle level, and the train boarding area at the 
lowest level. Ms. Tamari went on to explain that the structure and architecture of each station will 
be determined by the soil conditions in that particular area. All of the stations will have a good 
deal of exposed concrete, steel, and glass. 

Ms. Tamari showed a detailed animation of the Chinatown station. The Chinatown station will be 
unique in that it will be constructed entirely underground with a tunnel boring method, creating a 
curved tunnel structure with high ceilings, giving the station a light and airy feel. Ms. Tamari 
talked about the space in detail, pointing out areas where art could be installed or architecturally 
integrated. Many of the walls are as high as forty feet, making them ideal spots for large-scale 
artworks. In addition, small-scale art could be installed on the mezzanine level, and surface 
designs could be added to the terrazzo floors on both the lobby and the platform levels. The 
discussion continued for some time regarding specific aspects of the architectural design of the 
stations. Ms. Tamari clarified that they are still in the engineering phase of the design, so aspects 
could still change, although the basic concept will remain. 

Unlike Chinatown, the Union Square station will not have curved walls, though it will contain a 
two-block-long concourse connecting Union Square, across from Macy's, with the intersection of 
Powell and Market Streets. At this time, the percentage of concourse space dedicated for retail 
use is not yet finally determined, nor has a decision been made about how artworks would be 
integrated into a more commercial setting. Ms. Tamari stated that Kwan Henmi 
Architecture/Planning welcomes the opportunity to work collaboratively with the Arts Commission 
on architecturally integrated artwork. Commissioner Przyblyski stated that she encouraged the 
Committee to see this project as a puzzle in which several groups each added a piece to the 
whole: the community, the architects, the Commission, Arts Commission staff, and the artists. 
The Committee also discussed designating several categories of art opportunities at each station, 
such as a large-scale signature piece for each station. 

Lastly, Ms. Tamari gave a brief description of Moscone station. The Moscone station will not be as 
deep as Union Square or Chinatown; however, it will provide some opportunities similar to the 
other two stations, including a forty-foot wall that would be ideal for artwork. 

Ms. Moran showed several examples of art on other transit systems, explaining that many of 
these images are also being shown at. the community meetings conducted by Arts Commission 
staff. The range of artworks presented included architecturally integrated works, suspended 
works, light sculptures, tilework, terrazzo, and light boxes with reproductions of two-dimensional 
imagery. 

Ms. Moran showed the work of all thirty artists currently in the pre-qualified artist pool. In 
addition to these artists, Arts Commission staff is engaged in extensive outreach in anticipation of 
the. next artist selection process. The Committeee discussed artist selection at length. 
Commissioner Rinder stated that he would like to see more high-profile artists, while 
Commissioner Przyblyski stated that this is also a great opportunity to engage local artists, and 
perhaps youth artists, particularly if there is a rotating exhibition area. She also suggested 
considering artists from other countries, including China. Additionally, Ms. Moran announced that 



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the Arts Commission will create a series of temporary projects in Central Subway neighborhoods 
throughout the nine-year design and construction phase. Ms. Manton stated that Arts Commission 
staff is planning a field trip along Stockton Street in Chinatown to identify potential sites for 
temporary projects. Given the congestion of this area, Commissioner Przyblyski suggested that 
Chinatown may be an ideal area to use bus wraps. Commissioners and staff expressed a great 
deal of excitement regarding the many opportunities this project presents. 

11 Fillmore Street Bridge 

Ms. Manton reported on Three Shades of Blue on the Fillmore Street Bridge by artist Mildred 
Howard. This piece consists of twenty blue glass panels that take the place of a barrier, and 
travels the length of the bridge on each side. The glass is inscribed with the word "BLUE" and with 
a poem by Quincy Troupe that references the various cultures, past and present, of the 
neighborhood. Ms. Manton stated that the Redevelopment Agency is closing out their presence in 
the Western Addition and the bridge will soon be under the City's jurisdiction. At this time, the 
piece is in need of repair: four panels have been shattered by bullets, and it is scratched and 
cloudy in several spots. This may be due to improper cleaning after a graffiti coating was applied. 

The Redevelopment Agency has researched removing the glass panels completely and using a 
different material as a barrier, but this would cost approximately five hundred thousand dollars. 
Redevelopment has additional glass panels already fabricated, but they do not want to move 
forward with the installation of these replacement panels until a decision has been made about 
the future of the bridge. Commissioner Przyblyski commented that the area is changing, and the 
past year has seen no new bullet holes or further scratches in the glass. Redevelopment staff is 
also exploring the possibility of establishing a maintenance endowment which would be overseen 
by the Arts Commission. The Commissioners concluded that this is a difficult situation, and that 
the best next step is to work with Redevelopment to establish a maintenance endowment for the 
future care of this important public art project. 

12. Juri Commons 

Ms. Manton reported on extension of the temporary public art project at Juri Commons and the 
possible gift of this project to the City of San Francisco. Ms. Manton showed several images of this 
piece, and stated that the Committee was originally asked to approve this as a temporary project. 
The piece consists of mosaic tiles fabricated from recycled materials, such as bicycle reflectors, 
and is installed on the grounds of Juri Commons Park. Initially, the Committee expressed concern 
regarding the design and integrity of the fabrication of the work. In response to this, Jennifer 
Alexander, the project artist who designed the piece, worked with a professional tile fabricator. 
This improved the quality and durability of the project. At this time, the artist and the community 
would like to extend this project indefinitely. 

Ms. Manton recommended that the Arts Commission agree to extend the project for an ongoing 
period, subject to the approval of the Recreation and Park Department. She informed the 
Commissioners that staff recommended against accepting the work into the Civic Art Collection. 
The Committee agreed that the piece should remain, but that the Arts Commission would not 
accept it into our collection and would therefore have no responsibility for its continued 
maintenance. 

13. Academy of Sciences 

Ms. Manton updated the Commissioners on the Academy of Sciences project with artist Maya Lin. 
Ms. Manton stated that the Academy continues to have concerns regarding the issue of ownership 
and originality regarding the video table sculpture. The Academy Director would like to find a 
mutually agreeable solution to this. In addition, Ms. Lin's research regarding the video table 
options and cost estimates have led her to conclude that Option C is financially feasible. This is 



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the option with a glass top for video projection and metal clad sides. Still undetermined are the 
cooling system requirements and maintenance or replacement costs. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that as the Academy building is now complete, she would like to 
see Ms. Lin construct a foam model of the video table so that the Academy of Sciences Advisory 
Committee is able to see the proposed scale in the context of the building. Commissioner Hunter 
recommended that Ms. Lin construct multiple foam models showing all of the proposed scales. In 
addition, given the remaining issues, Commissioner Przyblyski requested that the Academy 
Advisory Pane! convene with the members of the Visual Arts Committee in order to have all of the 
decision-makers present at the same time. The discussion continued for some time about the 
various issues. 

14. New Business 

There was no new business. 

15. Old Business 

Project Manager Tonia Macneil stated that Brian Goggin and his collaborator, Dorka Keehn, are 
progressing with completion of design on the Broadway Streetscape Public Art Project. They have 
raised additional funds so that the number of bird/book sculptures will increase from 11 to 23, the 
original goal of the project. As well, the Museum of Modern Art has agreed to host their 
performance of the scattering of words to create the pavement element. The artist is still working 
on raising more funds. Ms. Macneil expects to present the final design documents, including the 
engineering design, to the Committee in February, According to the current construction schedule, 
the sculpture will be installed by November, 2008. 

Ms. Manton introduced new Public Art Program Associate Mary Chou. Ms. Chou stated that she 
has bachelor's degrees in Art History and Business, and a master's degree in Modern Art and 
Curatorial Studies. Previously, Ms. Chou interned at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Art:21, 
and the Public Art Fund, and worked at the Asia Society Museum in New York. Most recently, Ms. 
Chou worked at Visual Aid here in the Bay Area. She is thrilled to join the staff at the Arts 
Commission. 

16. Adjournment 

As there was no further business; the meeting was adjourned at 5:28 p.m. 

ES and MC 1/23/2008 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts Commission office, 25 
Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during regular business hours. INFO: Mary 
Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic devices are 
prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the removal from the meeting of 
any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell phone, pager, or other similar sound-producing 
electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or administrative action 
may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San Francisco Campaign and Governmental 
Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register and report lobbying activity. For more information 



http://www.sf gov. org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=74526 1 /30/2008 



sfac: January 16, 2008 Page 9 of 9 



about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 
Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and website. 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. Commissions, 
boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct the people's business. This 
ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the people and that City operations are open 
to the people's review. For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report 
a violation of the ordinance, contact Adele Destro by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine Ordinance 
Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by phone at 415 
554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at sotf@sfgov.org. 

Citizens interested in obtaining a free copy of the Sunshine Ordinance can request a copy from Ms. 
Destro or by printing Chapter 67 of the San Francisco Administrative Code on the Internet, 
http ://www. sfgov.org/sunshine/ 



http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=74526 1/30/2008 



*&t> 



January 1 1 , 2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Susan Pontious 

RE: Proposed Gift of Memorial Bust of Adolf Sutro 

The United Humanitarian Mission, a non-profit organization, is proposing to donate a memorial 
bust of Mayor Adolf Sutro ( 1 830- 1 898), who was mayor for one two-year-term in 1 984. Sutro is 
best remembered in San Francisco history for his purchase of the Cliff House in the early 1 880's 
and one thousand acres of land facing the ocean, now called Sutro Heights. He built the famed 
saltwater Sutro baths and the planted the Sutro Forest. He was said to have owned the finest 
private library in America, much of which was destroyed in the fire that followed the 1906 
earthquake. 

The organization will pay for all costs of the project. It should be noted that in staff opinion, the 
project is under-budgeted and the group will need to adjust their budget to reflect actual cost 
estimates. They will also be advised that there are no funds available from the Arts Commission 
for this project. 

Proposed artists: The organization has approached the artist group Daub, Firmin and 
Hendrickson (DFH) about the commission for the bust. This is the same group that currently has 
a contract with the Arts Commission for the Harvey Milk Memorial Bust. 

Site: The bust is proposed for City Hall, but the exact location will be determined at a later date. 
The staff has advised the City Hall Preservation Committee that a master plan needs to be 
developed to accommodate future donations of commemorative busts. 

Staff Recommendation: Staff recommends approval of the gift in concept. The Commission must 
approve the artist's 3-dimensional maquette before giving final approval for the project. We 
believe the bust as proposed meets the criteria for the goals for the civic art collection, as 
expressed in the Civic Art Collection Guidelines. This assumes that the project will be executed 
by artists named above, or another artist(s) capable of similar professional quality of work. 



UHM 




UNITED HUMANITARIAN MISSION 

2107 Van Ness Avenue Suite 308A, San Francisco, CA 94109 

(415) 567 - 5082 Fax: (415) 776 -3619 

www.rescuedus.org e-mail: uhmsf@hotmaiI.com 



Leonid Nakhodkin, Foundcr.Chairman 
ind President 



Board of Directors 

Roman Polyak, Ph D.. Vice President 

Daniel Usikov Ph D.. Fvecutivc Director 

Vlihail Chemiakin 

Oleg Vidov 

I ubov Pilina.Ph.D. 

Michael Braude 

Inna Morcvova 

Arkady Uchenik 



Honorary members 

Franco Perlasca, Assesor Comunc di 
Padova. Italy 

Michael Wagner, writer. Itali Paolo Fa/ioli, 
"Fazioli Pianoforti srl" Founder and 
Director, Italy 

Advisory Committee 

Gavin Newsom, Mayor of San Francisco 

Willie L Brown Jr.. former Mayor of San 

Francisco 

Michael Mcfaul. PhD, Assistant Professor 

Stanford University 



Treasurer 

A ready Uchenik 

Secretary 

Michael Braude 



Educational programs 

I ubov Pilina. Ph.D.. Coordinator 

Media and Art programs 

Natalia Andreichenko. Producer 
Andrew I inda. Coordinator 
Angela Ganihurg co-Coordinator 

Health programs 

Idward Rochlm. M D.Ph D Coordinator 



Humanitarian 



Environmental programs 

I eonid Nakhodkin. Coordinator 

Public Relations 

Julia Brtcc. Coordinator 



November 5, 2008 

Mrs. Jill Menton 

Program Director 

Art Commission of San Francisco 

Dear Mrs. Menton: 

" The Bust in honor of Adolf Sutro, 
the former Mayor of San Francisco ". 

Adolf Heinrich Joseph Sutro was born on April 29, 1930. In 1984 
he ran for mayor of San Francisco and served one two-year term. 
He purchased the Cliff House in the early 1880s, and one thousand 
acres of land facing the ocean, now called Sutro Heights. He built the 
Sutro saltwater bath and planted Sutro Foresl. He owned the first 
private library in America. Sutro died in San Francisco August 8, 1 898. 
Our organization wishes to install in the San Francisco City Hall area a 
memorial bust in honor of Adolf Sutro. 

The United Humanitarian Mission will provide all of the financing 
and technical requirements for this historical heritage project. 

The United Humanitarian Mission(UHM) is a non-profit, non- 
partisan, non-religious organization that maintains the goal to improve 
society's moral health by combating the loss of universal human 
values; method: by erecting a memorial and educational centers 
honoring the Humanitarian heroes of the World. Our organization was 
established in 1998 and based in San Francisco. 

I would therefore be very grateful if the San Francisco Art 
Commission were able to support our project. 



Sincerely, 




r 




Leonid Nakhodkin 
President 



Bosnia & Hercegovina 
Office 

Svetlana Bro/. M I) .Coordinator 
Uadzici 



, 



UHM November 5, 2007 Page 2 



THE UNITED HUMANITARIAN MISSION (UHM): 

The United Humanitarian Mission (UHM), a non-profit, non-partisan educational and research 
institution has been based in San Francisco since 1998. 

The UHM seeks to inform; it does not take political or religious positions or attempt to influence 
policy. 

The UHM honors anyone who has clearly demonstrated universal humanitarianism with the title" 
Humanitarian of the World". 

The UHM has been classified by the Internal Revenue Service as a tax-exempt, publicly supported 
organization as described in section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. 

The UHM's mission is to improve society's health by combating the tendencies that lead to the loss of 
universal human value among the children and young adults. The principal trust of the UHM's activities, 
therefore, will be devoted to the education of children and young adults. 

The UHM receives support from individuals, corporations and foundations. 



P ROPOSAL 
2007 -2008 



This project is intended to erect a bronze bust in honor of former mayor Adolf Sutro. 

The United Humanitarian Mission will be a recipient of funds and will be responsible for all 
financial and technical aspect of the project. The United Humanitarian Mission (UHM), a non- 
profit, non-partisan educational and research institution based in San Francisco, California. 

The UHM has been classified by the Internal Revenue Service as a tax-exempt, publicly 
supported, educational and research institution as described in section 501(c)(3) of the internal 
Revenue Code. 

Specific Activities. 

The methods of research strategy chosen for this project may be divided into four categories: 

- ( 1 ) literature survey and analysis relevant to the aims underlined in the goal and objectives 
section. 

- (2) study of historical, first-hand sources in the major archives and libraries. . 



DHM November 5, 2007 Page 3 

THE BUST 

Concept: 

The stone base with bronze bust would rise vertically from the ground to a height of 6 , 5" and 
2*5" wide. The plaque with short biography to be affixed so it would face upward in such a way 
that people standing near the plaque could conveniently read them. 



Schedule outline: 

Phase 1 (9/01/2007-10/01/07): 

Design, research and development. (Completed) 
Phase 2 (11/10/07- 11/25/07): 

Develop sketch or drawing of project. 
Phase 3 (01/30/08) 

Approve the project by San Francisco Arts Commission. 
Phase 4 (May 1 , 2008 - August 1 , 2008) 

Finalize project and install a bust. 

Great opening and public event (August 8, 2008- 110 Anniversary). 



BUDGET 

2007- 2008 



Expected income 



Grants: 
Governmental agencies $15,000.00 

Foundations $10,000.00 

Corporations $5,000.00 

Subtotal.... $30,000.00 

Donations-in-kind $3,000.00 

Individual contributions $2,000.00 

Special Events $5,000.00 

Subtotal $10,000.00 



Total $40,000.00 



UHM November 5, 2007 Page 4 

Expected expenses 

Design $8,000.00 

Labor, material $20,000.00 

Shipping $1,500.00 
Repairing architectural 
complex and installation 

of the bust $5,000.00 

Publishing $5,200.00 

Event $1,300.00 

Miscellaneous $1,000.00 

Total: $42,000,000 

PORTFOLIO 

The United Humanitarian Mission(UHM) is a non-pro fit(501 (C)(3), non-partisan, 
non-religious organization that maintains the goal to improve society's moral health by 
combating the loss of universal human values; method: by erecting a memorial and 
educational centers honoring the Humanitarian heroes of the World. UHM was 
established in 1998 and based in San Francisco. 

Members of the Board (contact): 

Roman Polyak. Vice President, 

Professor of John Mason University (703) 993-1685 

Daniel Usikov, Executive Vice President 

Lead Researcher of Agelent Technology (650) 485-3738 

Activities: 

The installation of a bronze plaque at 6th Avenue and JFK by the United Humanitarian 
Mission and associated landscape improvements (City and County of San Francisco, 
Recreation and Park Commission was approved, February 6, 2003) 
The installation plaque to commemorate Russian Sailors was placed on Russian Hill 
as a gift from the United Humanitarian Mission with support from the Government of 
the Russian Federation. (San Francisco City and County, Arts Commission was 
approved. November 3, 2003) 

Exhibitions: 

ArtPeople Gallery October 3rd 2003 

Washington DC Residence of the Ambassador of the Russian Federation, February 23, 

2000 

Events: 

Royal Danish Consulate & Consulate General of Sweden: October 1, 1997, October 1, 
1998. October 1. 1999, October 1, 2000, October 1, 2001, 
October 1.2002. 



Collections Report 

Vandalism of the Embarcadero Ribbon Update 

Project Manager, Carol Marie Daniels attended the Restitution Hearing on 
December 20, 2007. Superior Court Judge Kathleen A. Kelly issued an Order for 
Restitution and Abstract of Judgement against the three defendants. The Court 
ordered the defendants to pay $7,7 10.73, plus 10% per year, from the date of 
sentencing, to the City of San Francisco. The amount of restitution includes the 
cost associated with repairing the damaged property. 

The City Attorney can enforce the order by bringing a civil suit but, the 
defendants are indigent and it is unlikely that they will actually make restitution. 
However, restitution is a condition of their probation and a payment 
Schedule may be set by Adult Probation. 

The 50 stolen skateblocks became the property of 850 Bryant at the time of the 
defendants' arrest and the bronze skateblocks will be released to Juvenal 
Villarreal, DPW Cement Shop Supervisor and stored at DPW-BUF for future re- 
installation on the bollards along the Embarcadero. 



January 16,2008 

To: Members, Visual Arts Committee, San Francisco Arts 
Commission 

From: Hayes Valley Arts Coalition 



Proposal: Temporary, 6 month installation of a steel sculpture by 
bay area artist Michael Christian. 

Location: The dedicated art space at Patricia's Green in Hayes 
Valley, Hayes Street and Octavia Boulevard. 

Sculpture: Koilos (from the Greek word meaning hollow) 

An over-sized human figure, crouching, with its legs ready to 
move, pounce or play. The figure reflects restraint, knowledge and 
wisdom while still feeling anxious, excited and oblivious. 



Specifications: 

Construction- a metal armature covered with welded metal cut- 
outs. The piece is made of four sections that bolt together. It 
requires a small forklift to assemble. 

Size - 12' High x 19' Long x 9' Wide. Weights approx 450 
pounds 

Needs - Only a 120 electrical connection for the light in its head. 
A solar source could be used, as the light is a very low wattage. 



January 10. 2008 Owen Smith 

1608 Fernside Blvd. 
Alameda CA 94501 
Phone (510)865-1911 
owensmith@alamedanet.net 

Art on Market Street Project Proposal 

Presented by Owen Smith for consideration by The Visual Arts Committee of the San 

Francisco Arts Commission 

HARDBOILED HAMMETT 

San Francisco holds a unique place in the history and development of Mystery and 
Detective Fiction. My Market Street Poster Project proposal pays tribute to the city's most 
important author of detective fiction, Dashiell Hammett, and the famous (and infamous) 
cast of memorable characters he created. 

Throughout San Francisco's colorful history' throngs of adventurous individuals 
have come to the city desperate for the glint of gold and the promise of a new life. At 
rimes the city itself seems to gleam in the sun above the sparkling bay, and at other times 
fierce ocean wind will shroud the buildings that cling to the hills with thick ominous fog. 
San Francisco is a vital city that attracts people of great talent as well as desperate souls and 
those who would exploit them. Vast fortunes have been made and lost. Chinatown and 
the Barbary Coast offered the taste of the exotic and elicit. It is not surprising then, that 
numerous writers chose to put their fictional detectives to work on the foggy streets of San 
Francisco. 

Dashiell Hammett practically invented the fictional hard-boiled gumshoe detective. 
His wisecracking Sam Spade and Continental Op characters were created while Hammett 
lived in San Francisco. Even Nick and Nora Charles of the "Thin Man" series were San 
Francisco natives. Hammett often included real streets and addresses in his stories, a 
number of these in the Market Street area. He wrote of actual Hotels, speakeasies, and 
apartment houses. Sam Spade's fictional fourth floor apartment was modeled after 
Ham mett's own Post Street address. In the "Maltese Falcon" Spade's partner, Miles Archer 
is killed near Stockton and Bush Streets. Today there is a plaque commemorating the 
imagined event at this spot. Before starting his literary career Hammett himself worked as 
a detective in the Pinkerton Agency out of the James Flood Building at 870 Market Street. 
During this time he frequented John's Grill, still located on Ellis Street. In Hammett's 
stories Sam Spade is a also a regular at Sam's. Today the grill is a pilgrimage for Detective 
Fiction fans. Recently a replica of the Maltese Falcon was stolen from the restaurant's 
display case. Apparently the famous bird still can inspire larceny. 



The Proposal: 

The first five posters will each depict a great moment from a Dashiell Hammett 
novel or short story. These paintings would concentrate on the characters as well as evoke 
the mood and atmosphere of San Francisco. The backgrounds would include derails of 
period interiors, city streets, buildings, and landmarks. 



Each poster will include ;\ pertinent quote or short excerpt from the story. Here are 
some samples from "The Maltese Falcon": 

"Don 't be so sure I'm as crooked as I'm suppose to be" 

Sam Spade 

"I haven 't lived a good life, " she cried, "I've been bad— worse than you 
could know— but I'm not all bad. " 

Miss Wonderly 

"You know, that's good, because if you actually were as innocent as you 
pretend to be, we'd never get anywhere" 

Sam Spade 

"Keep on riding me and they're gonna be picking iron out of your liver" 

Wilmer Cook 

He looked rather pleasantly like a blond Satan. 

Description of Sam Spade 

"I couldn't be fonder of you if you were my own son. But, well, if you lose 
a son, it is possible to get another. There's only one Maltese Falcon. " 

Kasper Outman 



The image for the sixth poster would he a portrait of Pashiell Hammett, along with 
biographical information and a map showing important Hammett landmarks in the city. 

All the poster art would he rendered in full color with accompanying type in the 
style of Pulp Magazines and Mystery novel jackets of the 1920's and 19^0's. Included here 
are samples of my past work to give a sense of the style. 

I have attempted to contact via email the local author Don Herron. He is an 
authority on Dashiell Hammett, runs a Hammett fan website, and regularly conducts 
walking tours. I would love to enlist his participation in an event related to this poster 
project, perhaps involving a special talk or tour. I hope to hear from him soon. 

Thank you for considering this proposal. The Art on Market Street Program is an 
tremendous opportunity for any artist. I would love the chance to celebrate Dashiell 
I lammett's startlingly dark, witty, colorful, and irreverent view of the city we all love. 



Sincerely, Owen Smith 



sfac: February 20, 2008 Page 1 of 4 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

February 20, 2008 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 
Wednesday, February 20, 2008 

3:00 p.m. 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

Agenda FEB 2 2G08 

SAN FRANCISCO 

1. Consent PUBLIC LIBRARY 

1. Motion to rescind Resolution No. 0107-08-013 authorizing an agreement with the artist team of 
Peter Richards and Susan Schwartzenberg for an amount not to exceed $142,000, to design, 
fabricate, and install a public art project at McLaren Park. 

2. Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into agreement with Peter Richards 
for a public art project to be executed in conjunction with Susan Schwartzenberg in McLaren Park, 
for a total amount not to exceed $145,000, for the design, development, fabrication, 
transportation and installation of an artwork as well as identification plaques. 

3. Motion to approve the Harvey Milk Memorial sculpture base materials: Autumn Brown granite 
with Optima regular typeface for the text, with real-gold leaf infill. 

2. Gallery Report 

Meg Shiftier 

Presentation on the next few window installations at 155 Grove Street. Exhibitions include a 
project by local artist collective Kunsole and a reworking of Jon Rubin's international project, 
Never Been to Tehran. 

Motion: Motion to provide an artist honorarium of $1200 to Deric Carner, for his commissioned 
window installation at 155 Grove Street. The honorarium amount should be made available to the 
artist upon the installation of artwork on March 19, 2008. 

3. Broadway Streetscape Phases I & II 

Tonia Macneil 

Explanatory document: Staff report. 

Artist Brian Goggin will present the design development and construction model, prototype, and 

related documents for Language of the Birds. 

Motion: Motion to approve the design development for Language of the Birds by Brian Goggin 
and authorization to the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with the artist for 
fabrication, transportation, and installation of the artwork for an amount not to exceed $130,000. 

Motion: Motion to accept a gift of restricted funds in an amount of up to $65,000 to augment the 
previous gift of $30,000 supplementing the Broadway Streetscape Project art enrichment 
allocation. The funds will be set up in an interest-bearing account that will be used exclusively for 
the art project by Brian Goggin. 

4. Proposed Installation of Sculptures by Manolo Valdes in Civic Center Plaza 

Jill Man ton 



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sfac: February 20, 2008 Page 2 of 4 



Report on the proposed temporary installation of nine bronze sculptures by artist Manolo Valdes 
for a four-month period beginning in late April or May 2008. 

Motion: Motion to approve the temporary installation of nine bronze sculptures by artist Manolo 
Valdes in late April or May 2008 for a total duration of four months based upon the assumption 
that all transportation, insurance and installation supervision and coordination costs will be 
privately sponsored. 

Moscone Center West Project 

Jill Manton 

Explanatory document: Staff report. 

Report on modification of agreement with Pol-X West for the Moscone Center West project. 

Motion: Motion to approve a modification of the agreement with Pol-X West to include an 
extension of the project completion date until December 31, 2010, an additional allocation of 
$60,000 for the fabrication, and shipping costs associated with the redesign of the motion system 
for the Facsimile artwork at Moscone Center West, the supervision of the removal of existing 
motion system components, the supervision of the installation of new motion system components, 
and the ongoing adjustments and repairs to the system. 

Proposed Gift of World War II Memorial 

Susan Pontious 

Explanatory document: Staff report. 

Report on the proposed gift by the Russian American Veterans Legion of World War II of a 

memorial to the meeting of Russian and American troops at Elba River on April 25, 1945. The 

Committee may make one of the two following resolutions: 



Only one of the following motions needs approval: 



Motion: Motion to give conceptual approval to the Russian American Veterans Legion of World 
War II proposed gift of a monument commemorating the meeting of the Russian and American 
troops on the Elba River with final approval dependent on the Commission's giving design 
approval of the monument, the donor identifying a site approved by the Arts Commission and the 
department with jurisdiction of the site, and the donor's providing funding for Arts Commission 
administrative staff and demonstrating the ability to provide a maintenance endowment in an 
amount to be determined and approved by the Commission. 

Motion: Motion to decline the Veterans Legion of World War II proposed gift of a monument 
commemorating the meeting of the Russian and American troops on the Elba River. 

7. San Francisco International Airport 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation on the remodeling of Terminal Two of the San Francisco International Airport. 

A. Secure Connector 
Project update 

B. Terminal Two Remodel 

a. Project overview 

b. Impact on existing artwork installations and reinstallation of artworks 

c. Public art opportunities 

d. Airport Memorandum of Understanding 



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a fac: February 20, 2008 Page 3 of 4 



Motion: Motion to approve the removal of Conquest of Space by Rufino Tamayo from Terminal 
Two, and the reinstallation of the sculpture in the landscaped traffic island near the Level One 
entry to Parking Garage A, or to another site identified by Arts Commission and Airport staff. 

8. Junipero Serra Playground 

Tonia Macneil 

Presentation of project completion and images of installed artwork. 

Motion: Motion to approve the untitled ceramic tile artwork for Junipero Serra Playground by 
Bean Finneran as installed. 

Motion: Motion to accept into the Civic Art Collection of the City and County of San Francisco the 
untitled ceramic tile artwork by Bean Finneran for Junipero Serra Playground. 

9. Hamilton Recreation Center 

Tonia Macneil 

Presentation of design development proposal for artwork by Horace Washington for the fagade of 

Hamilton Recreation Center, located at Geary and Steiner Streets. 

Motion: Motion to approve the design development of artwork by Horace Washington for the 
fagade of Hamilton Recreation Center. 

10. Branch Library Improvement Program 

Judy Moran 

Presentation of Scott Donahue's final design for the Rhicmond Branch Library. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final design of two outdoor sculptures by artist Scott Donahue for 
the Richmond Branch Library and to authorize Scott Donahue to proceed to fabrication and 
installation of the artworks. 

11. New Public Art Opportunity - SOMA Ancilliary Project 

Jill Manton/Regina Almaguer 
Presentation of new public art opportunity. 

12. Academy of Sciences 

Jill Manton 

Report on the Academy of Sciences project. 

13. Baker Street Pump Station 

Jill Manton/Regina Almaguer 

Report on the artwork of Patrick Dougherty at the Baker Street Pump Station. 

14. Relocation of bust of Mayor Angelo Rossi 

Jill Manton 

Explanatory document: Staff report. 

Report on the relocation of the bust of Mayor Angelo Rossi. 

15. Randall Museum 

Regina Almaguer 

Update on the Randall Museum Art Project. 



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sfac: February 20, 2008 Page 4 of < 



16. New Business 

17. Old Business 

Update on relocation of the Rabbinoid sculpture by Gerald Heffernon from Stern Grove to Esprit 
Park. 

Staff report on art project at Sava Pool by Brian Goggin called Guideposts. 

18. Adjournment 

MC 1/15/2008 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts Commission office, 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during regular business hours. INFO: Mary 
Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic devices are 
prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the removal from the meeting of 
any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell phone, pager, or other similar sound- 
producing electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or administrative action 
may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San Francisco Campaign and Governmental 
Conduct Code sections 2,100 - 2.160) to register and report lobbying activity. For more information 
about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 
Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 
http://www.sfgov,org/ethics. 



KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. Commissions, 

boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct the people's business. This 

ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the people and that City operations are open 

to the people's review. For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report 

a violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine 

Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by 

phone at (415) 554-7724; by fax at (415) 554-7854; or by email at sotf@sfgov.org. 

Citizens interested in obtaining a free copy of the Sunshine Ordinance can request a copy from Mr. 

Darby or by printing Chapter 67 of the San Francisco Administrative Code on the Internet, 

http://www.sfgov.org/sunshine/. 



http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=75452 2/1 5/2008 



STAFF REPORTS 

Date: Feb. 11,2008 

To: The Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Susan Pontious 

Re: Consent Calendar - Harvey Milk Memorial 

On Jan. 30, 2008, Rob Firmin of the artist team Daub, Firmin and Hendrickson Sculpture Group 
("DFH") met with Jill Manton, Joey Cain (of the Harvey Milk City Hall Memorial Committee) 
and me to present the artists' recommendation for the granite color for the sculpture base, the 
text typeface, and fill treatment for the text. Mr. Firmin presented samples of three different 
granite colors with different sandblasted text typeface and different infill treatments. 

The granites included: Carnelian, Amber Gold and Autumn Brown. 

The lettering infill tests included: real-gold leaf, lithochrome gold, lithochrome light (two 

shades) and brown. 

Typefaces included: Optima bold and Optima regular. 

We were all in agreement that Autumn Brown granite provided a warm, appealing color while 
giving the best contrast for the lettering. 

Optima regular was the typeface selected with real-gold infill. It was agreed that sandblasted text 
was acceptable. 



DATE: February 20, 2008 

TO: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Tonia Macneil 



Project: Broadway Streetscape Improvements 

Location: Broadway at Columbus 

Project: Language of the Birds 

Artist: Brian Goggin 

Brian Goggin will present the design development mockup, model, and plans of his artwork, 
Language of the Birds. 

Over the last 15 months, since first presenting his proposal, Mr. Goggin has been negotiating his 
contract and, along with his collaborator Dorka Keehn, working on design development. As 
previously reported, they have been successful in raising most of the additional funds to create 
the entire original vision of 26 book/birds. In addition, they have persuaded SFMOMA to 
sponsor a one-time performance at which the words for the sidewalk text element will be laid out 
while reading the phrases selected from 50-odd books suggested by the North Beach/Chinatown 
community as well as the ancient Sufi poem Language of the Birds. 

Mr. Goggin is currently completing final design. Staff approval of construction documents will 
be based on a lighting analysis or on-site lighting test to gauge the effect of the lighting on the 
residents of the adjacent building, and on submission of structural engineering drawings and 
calculations, among other items. Construction at Broadway and Columbus will begin on 
February 25. The artwork may be installed as early as September 2008. 

In the interest of a concise presentation and fruitful discussion, below is the artist's written 
design development description of the proposal. 



LANGUAGE OF THE BIRDS 

Written Specifications of Materials, Production and Installation Methods 
Prepared by Brian Goggin and Dorka Keehn 

1. Book making process: 

The sculpted books are made with outdoor industrial sign quality UV-rated white polycarbonate 
shaped by both vacuforming, for the interior page forms, and hot slump forming for the exterior 
bindings. The page forms are then hand-tooled to fit the individual bindings. The lighting units 
are made with wide-beam LED lights mounted to the interior of the forms so the light reflects off 
page forms to illuminate the books. The vacuformed elements are fastened to the binding with 
both a UV-rated high quality silicon and internal plastic fasteners made with cemented and 
screwed clear polycarbonate tabs. The silicon will seal the entire unit to ensure water and dirt do 
not enter the interior cavity. We will attach the books to stainless steel aircraft cables using 
stainless steel eyebolts, washers and lock-tight secured nuts. 

2. Plaza floor: 



We will create the pattern for the embedded word layout for the plaza in the SFMOMA Atrium. 
To accomplish this, we will enlarge the scanned text that we have researched from locally related 
texts (see attachment I), to the exact size we would like them to appear on the flooring. We will 
print and cut out phrases into approximately 850 individual words with varying fonts from the 
original publications. We will layout the 59 three-foot by three-foot pavers of the plaza floor 
with butcher paper, then stand above the pattern on the open staircase, from the height the books 
will hang above the plaza, and scatter a flurry of printed words into the air. The words will flutter 
down and randomly land on the butcher paper grid, some right side up, others upside down. We 
will adhere them where they land. Depending on time constraints, part or all of the following 
would either be done on location at SFMOMA or at our studio: cut the pattern up into the three- 
foot by three-foot paver sections, map how the sections fit together, and photograph the sections. 

We will provide digital files of all sidewalk panel designs illustrating exact placement and font 
for all words. The San Francisco DPW-hired contractor will make a stencil for each three-foot by 
three-foot panel. We will work with the contractor to locate all the stencils in the proper 
locations, after which the contractor will sandblast all the words into the dark pavement. The 
contractor will fill all the cavities with a white epoxy. After the contractor has finished this step, 
we will work with him to remove all the stencils and we will inspect all the word inlays. If there 
are any imperfections we will work with the contractor to fix them. 

3. Maintenance: 

The books are made with exterior industrial sign quality polycarbonate. Little maintenance will 
be required. If dust or dirt has built up after some time, the books may be cleaned with soap and 
water. The LEDs are estimated to last over 100,000 hours. The LEDs will be dimmed below 
their full capacity to extend their life and vary the lighting effects. When servicing is required, 
the page forms can be simply removed by slicing the silicone with a razor blade and unscrewing 
one of the vacuformed page forms to allow replacement of the LED light unit. The page form 



should then be re-sealed by screwing it back in place and replacing the silicon around the seal. 
Areas where silicon is not required should be taped off to keep the line of the silicon minimal 
and straight. 

4. Transportation plan: 

John Law, the installation contractor, will bring all materials and art pieces to the site for 
installation. This will include all rigging supplies, sculpted books, and all installation materials. 
The City will provide barricades and any ADA access requirements. 

5. Installment plan: 

a. Rigging: 

The plaza surface will be protected with plywood while installing the rigging and sculpted 
illuminated books. We will measure, number and cut all cables on-site. Using the maquette of the 
sculpture, we will plot the x,y,z placement coordinates for the books on and above the plaza 
floor. On the ground, we will attach the cables to rigging rings using thimbles. The rings will be 
placed at all cable junctions directly above each book. We will use an articulated boom lift to rig 
up the cabling system and hang and wire the sculptures. John Law, our rigging contractor, and 
his assistant, Karl Gillick, will raise the cables to the appropriate heights per our direction. The 
cables will attach to the street lamps and traffic signal poles using standard SF Muni cable 
attachment bands. The rigging crew will attach each book to the three cables that join at the 
matching rigging ring. This triangulated hanging attachment will mitigate swing, thus stabilizing 
the books. 

b. Electrical: 

All books are wired to a light controller unit sealed in a weatherproof box mounted to the 
exterior of one of the light poles. We will work with the DPW electrician to install the 
weatherproof box onto one of the four light poles. This box will contain the light controller 
circuitry. The electrical wires, in UV-protected sleeves, will come out of the top of the books and 
run along the cables to the box. Our installation team and electrician will run the wires from the 
books to the suspension rigging, and attach the wiring to the cables with UV-rated zip ties. Once 
reaching the closest light or signal pole, the electrical wires will run through a conduit inside the 
light and traffic signal poles. Depending on the distance from the box, some electrical wires will 
run through a conduit under the plaza floor. The DPW electrician will, at DPW cost, wire the 
controller box to the City power line. 

6. Plaque: 

This plaque will be etched on bronze or zinc plate and formed to fit on a traffic light pole or wall 
and will be approximately 1 8" long x 9" wide. 



Date: February 11, 2008 

To: The Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Jill Manton, Program Director, Public Art 

Re: Report for Moscone Center West Project 

Moscone West - Facsimile Project by Diller and Scofidio 

After speaking with both Heming Tsueh of DPW and Stephen Hopkins, engineering consultant, 
Ric Scofidio of Diller and Scofidio decided that he wished to proceed with the proposed redesign 
of the motion system as proposed by Pol-X West. The City Attorney believes that the Arts 
Commission should contract directly with Pol-X to perform this work. Our Senior Accountant 
has advised me that the existing contract with Pol-X may be re-activated through a contract 
modification. 

The parts will be manufactured and installed under Pol-X's supervision. Sheedy Crane will 
provide the crane and labor needed to remove the existing motion system components and install 
the new components. I had previously negotiated this arrangement with Sheedy over a year ago. 
I am pleased to report that the President of Sheedy Crane said that he will honor his word and 
will not charge for this work. 

The work will likely cost approximately $50,000. Even with Diller and Scofidio forfeiting their 
final payment of approximately $ 1 0,000 and with no charge for the Sheedy work, we still have a 
funding deficit of $40,000 that I am working to resolve. 

I hope to have an update for you at the meeting. 



Date: Jan. 1,2008 

To: The Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Susan Pontious 

Re: Proposed Gift from Russian American Veterans Legion 

Description : The Russian American Veterans Legion is proposing a memorial commemorating 
the Russian and American alliance in fighting WWII, specifically the meeting at Elba River in 
German territory on April 25, 1945. The group proposes to place the monument facing Ocean 
Beach in Golden Gate Park. The group has submitted a packet of signed petitions supporting the 
monument, as well as letters of support from the American Legion (Eighth District) and the State 
Department of Veterans Affairs. 

The proposed monument is 15-18' tall, with a 4' x 8' foundation. It would depict two bronze 
soldiers (one Russian and the other American) shaking hands with each other on top of the 
monument. They will be standing on a granite letter "V" for victory. There will be text on the 
pedestal describing the event being memorialized. The committee has submitted a three- 
dimensional maquette of the monument. 

They have obtained a cost estimate from Red Pod, Inc. of $75,000 for design, materials, and 
shipping. Costs not included in Red Pod's estimate are the costs of structural engineering, 
sculpture footings, installation, fees and permits, and Arts Commission staff administration costs 
and a maintenance endowment. 



Staff Recommendation : The worthiness of the subject notwithstanding, it is the staff 
recommendation that this proposed monument be declined for the following reasons. 

1. The monument does not meet the Commission's mission and criteria for artworks it 
accepts into the collection because the primary identity of this monument is historical, 
and not as a work of art. The proposal, as reflected in the maquette, does not reflect the 
singular artistic vision of a professional artist and as such, does not possess inherent 
aesthetic quality. As per the Civic Art Collection guidelines, inherent aesthetic quality is 
the primary requirement for the acceptance of artworks into the Civic Art Collection. 

2. The proposed monument is not within the Commission's collection priorities in that it is 
not the work of a Bay Area or California artist, or of a national or international artist of 
note. Secondly, the historical event it honors is not specific to San Francisco history, 
other than that San Francisco is the home to many WWII veterans and a Russian 
immigrant population. 

3. The Commission has a moratorium on accepting gifts of art, particularly major 
monuments, due to the lack of staff resources to manage such projects. Despite the recent 
hiring of a Senior Registrar, the conditions that prompted the Commission to pass this 



resolution still exist. Although ostensibly a gift, a major monument like the one proposed 
nonetheless incurs significant costs in Art Commission staff time. The recent example of 
the Abraham Lincoln Brigade monument is an excellent case in point. Some of the work 
required involves reviewing and critiquing proposed designs, identification of appropriate 
sites, negotiation with the City department having jurisdiction over the site, guiding the 
donors through the City approval and permit process with both the Arts Commission and 
other City agencies, negotiation for the maintenance endowment, execution of complex 
three-party memorandums of understanding, and contractual agreements, to name a few. 
The resources of our collections management staff are already stretched meeting current 
demands of managing the critical maintenance and conservation needs of the existing 
collection, and trying to achieve the current priority goal of completing and documenting 
an inventory of the City's collection. Likewise, the public art staff is equally 
overextended. 

The proposed site for the memorial is unlikely to be viable. The Recreation and Park 
Commission currently has a moratorium on sculptures and memorials in Golden Gate 
Park. While this is not the Arts Commission's purview, it nonetheless impacts the 
feasibility of this project as proposed. 



Date: February 1 1 , 2008 

To: The Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Jill Manton, Program Director, Public Art 

Re: Relocation of bust of Mayor Angelo Rossi 

Harvey Milk Bust Location/Mayor Rossi Bust Relocation 

The City Hall Preservation Advisory Commission voted to approve the location proposed for the 
Harvey Milk bust in the Van Ness lobby of City Hall on a south-facing wall adjacent to the 
elevators. 

There was a significant amount of discussion about the need for a Master Plan and guidelines 
that deal with the architecture of the building, historical context and lighting. Arts Commission 
staff was asked to take the lead in developing these guidelines. 

Mayor Rossi's family representative stated her concern that an appropriate location needs to be 
identified for the Rossi bust which will be moved to accommodate the Harvey Milk bust. At a 
subsequent meeting with staff from the Mayor's Office about this matter, I was advised of the 
Mayor's Office preference to place both the Rossi bust and the proposed bust of Adolph Sutro in 
the Mayor's Rotunda. Arts Commission staff supports this proposed location and recommends 
that the Sutro bust be designed to be compatible with the scale of the Rossi to maintain 
symmetry and balance in the placement. 






Date: February 11, 2008 

To: The Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Jill Manton, Program Director, Public Art 

Re: Report on Sava Pool 

Sava Pool 

Recreation and Park staff organized a small meeting of community members regarding the 
proposal to place Brian Goggin's sculpture entitled Guidepost in the lawn area to the north of the 
pool. I am pleased to report that the four individuals at this meeting were extremely enthusiastic 
about the proposal. It was a relief to have this kind of response after dealing with the former 
objections regarding this work at the Moscone Recreation Center. One of the individuals I met 
was a retired curator from the DeMenil Museum in Houston who might be a candidate for a 
future selection panel. 

We also arranged for a conservator to meet with Mr. Goggin and Senior Registrar Allison 
Cummings to discuss whether any changes needed to be made to the materials that would be 
used in the sculpture given its proximity to the ocean and the salt air and fog that characterizes 
the environment. 

The next step in the process will involve a letter to the residents of the housing immediately 
adjacent to the park site. Assuming there are not major objections or obstacles that arise, we will 
proceed with the contracting process. 



sfac: February 20, 2008 Page 1 of 13 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

February 20, 2008 

Visual Arts Committee 
Wednesday, February 20, 2008 

3:00 p.m. 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 

Agenda 

Commissioners Present: 

Jeannene Przyblyski, Leonard Hunter, Lawrence Rinder 
Absent: Dede Wilsey, Pop Zhao 

Staff Present: 

Mary Chou, Luis Cancel, Allison Cummings, Carol Marie Daniels, Marcus Davies, Tonia Macneil, Jill 
Manton, Judy Moran, Susan Pontious, Ellen Shershow, Meg Shiffler 



u 



J °y 



Note: All votes are unanimous unless recorded otherwise. 

The meeting commenced at 3:03 p.m. 

1. Consent 

1. Motion to rescind Resolution No. 0107-08-013 authorizing an agreement with the artist team of 
Peter Richards and Susan Schwartzenberg for an amount not to exceed $142,000, to design, 
fabricate, and install a public art project at McLaren Park. 

2. Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into agreement with Peter Richards 
for a public art project to be executed in conjunction with Susan Schwartzenberg in McLaren Park, 
for a total amount not to exceed $145,000, for the design, development, fabrication, 
transportation and installation of an artwork as well as identification plaques. 

3. Motion to approve the Harvey Milk Memorial sculpture base materials: Autumn Brown granite 
with Optima regular typeface for the text, with real-gold leaf infill. 

Motion: Motion to adopt the consent calendar items. 
Moved: Rinder/Hunter 

2. Gallery Report 

Gallery Director Meg Shiffler presented the upcoming SFAC Gallery window installation at 155 
Grove Street by local artist collective Kunsole from March 20 to May 10, 2008. She stated that she 
will postpone her report on Jon Rubin's international project, Never Been to Tehran, which has not 
yet been confirmed at 155 Grove Street. Kunsole is a collaborative group composed of three 
artists, Deric Carner, Rebecca Miller and Roddy Schrock, who create works that focus on how 
patterns relate to sound. They will be doing a residency at Grove Street which will include creating 
evolving installation components and a new soundtrack every week. They will also host regularly 
scheduled performance events ranging from jam sessions to readings. Ms. Shiffler stressed that 
the group has been instructed to gear their performances to a passerby audience instead of a 
captive audience. Recording sessions will take place on Thursday evenings at 8:00 p.m., but Ms. 
Shiffler wants to make sure the recording sessions do not become concerts or performances as 
the group often works with local musicians. The $1,200 honorarium will include a mailer or flyers 
to be distributed. 



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Motion: Motion to provide an artist honorarium of $1200 to Deric Garner, for his commissioned 
window installation at 155 Grove Street. The honorarium amount should be made available to the 
artist upon the installation of artwork on March 19, 2008. 
Moved: Hunter/Rinder 

Broadway Streetscape Phases I & II 

Project Manager Tonia Macneil noted that Brian Goggin and his collaborator, Dorka Keehn, are 
currently in the final design phase of the Broadway Streetscape Public Art Project. Ms. Macneil 
confirmed that there will be a total of 23 book sculptures which are also referred to as "birds" 
because of their shape. She reported that the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art ("SFMOMA") 
may agree to sponsor a one-time happening for the scattering of words that will be incorporated 
into the design of the surrounding sidewalk. Among the outstanding items to be submitted by the 
artist is a lighting analysis assessing the artwork's impact on neighbors as well as final structural 
engineering. Ms. Macneil referenced an addition to the staff report which includes a list of authors 
and an image depicting the design of words on the pavement. 

Artist Brian Goggin then presented his project and explained that he has been working closely 
with Dorka Keehn, who unfortunately could not attend the meeting. He showed a prototype of the 
illuminated book and its fabrication. The books will be suspended from a steel cable system, at 
heights ranging from about 14 feet to 25 feet above the plaza. The polycarbonate book pages will 
be vacuumformed and attached to bindings of the same material using a silicone seal and a tab 
and bolt system. The interiors will have LED lights that connect to a computer which varies the 
lighting levels to create a pulsing effect that gives the impression of flight. The plaza floor will 
consist of 59 pavers with a scattering of words from texts proposed by various members of the 
community. Mr. Goggin will take phrases from the text that relate to the artwork, separate them 
into words, and scatter them in a random pattern. Photographs of this event will be taken and the 
resulting pattern of words from the images will be stenciled onto the paving. The cavities in the 
paving will be filled with UV-rated white epoxy to give the effect of silent movie title cards. Mr. 
Goggin explained that the performance of the scattering of the text with SFMOMA has not yet 
been confirmed, but he has other options for hosts of the event. Mr. Goggin then showed 
Commissioners the model of the work installed on the plaza but noted that the books will be 
suspended by their bindings rather than by their pages, as shown in the model, and that the 
layout of the electrical lines and light controller box will be designed to minimize the exposed 
wires. 

Commissioners had a series of technical questions, all of which Mr. Goggin addressed. In his 
responses, Mr. Goggin clarified that there will be four poles on the plaza to which the artwork will 
be attached: two are street lamp poles and two will have traffic lights. The poles will be reinforced 
at the base to ensure the stability of the artwork. Mr. Goggin also explained that the gaps in the 
books would be sealed with silicon to prevent water from getting into the books, and there would 
be a venting system for each book for the circulation of air and the release of any water that may 
get into the books. He also explained that the LED lights should last for 100,000 hours because 
they will be dimmed for part of the time. They should last for ten years or more before they need 
to be replaced, at which time there may be better LEDs on the market. Mr. Goggin then stated 
that the installation will occur in phases, first the text in the paving, then the rigging of the books, 
and he will work closely with the contractors. Ms. Macneil explained that the materials list will be 
reviewed by a conservator. 

Commissioner Rinder asked about the artist's method for selecting the authors. Mr. Goggin 
explained that he met with community members and researched authors who spent time in the 
Bay Area and those who had cultural and artistic influences on the North Beach/Chinatown 
community. He then looked for elements and themes in these texts that could be integral to the 



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artwork. 

Commissioner Rinder questioned whether it was possible that the phrases of text, when scattered, 
would overlap. Mr. Goggin explained that he will do tests, which he could show to the 
Commissioners for their approval. He also stated that the scattered words, potentially piled up 
and distorted, could be an interesting element of the project. 

Public Art Program Deputy Director Susan Pontious asked about the potential discoloration of the 
book material and the possible accumulation of grime. Mr. Goggin explained that he will be using 
UV-rated sign materials which are supposed to last over forty years with the possibility that they 
may yellow slightly, although he believes this would be an acceptable and even interesting 
element as it may approach the color of parchment. Also Mr. Goggin believes the light inside will 
counteract the effect of the coloring that may happen over time. 

Commissioner Przyblyski asked about the local pigeon population. Mr. Goggin reported that while 
he hasn't looked at any studies in the area, he has noticed that the pigeons usually inhabit the 
trees in the nearby park. He also stated that the books will be suspended and rigged in a way that 
slopes the front and back covers so that birds, who prefer to stand on horizontal surfaces, would 
not want to perch on them. 

Commissioner Przyblyski confirmed that the Commissioners will have an opportunity to review the 
design of the paving elements with the scattered words during the final design phase. 

Motion: Motion to approve the design development for Language of the Birds by Brian Goggin 
and authorization to the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with the artist for 
fabrication, transportation, and installation of the artwork for an amount not to exceed $130,000. 
Moved: Hunter/Rinder 

Motion: Motion to accept a gift of restricted funds in an amount of up to $65,000 to augment the 
previous gift of $30,000 supplementing the Broadway Streetscape Project art enrichment 
allocation. The funds will be set up in an interest-bearing account that will be used exclusively for 
the art project by Brian Goggin. 
Moved: Rinder/Hunter 

4. Proposed Installation of Sculptures by Manolo Valdes in Civic Center Plaza 

Public Art Program Director Jill Manton reported on the proposed temporary installation of nine 
bronze sculptures by artist Manolo Valdes for a four-month period beginning in late April or May 
2008. She explained that the transportation, insurance, and supervision of installation costs will 
be covered by the lender and the City will absorb costs associated with engineering, permit, 
signage, and crane rental. The total cost has not yet been confirmed, but she estimates that the 
costs to be covered by the City will range from $20,000 to $30,000. She stated that, based upon 
her experience with the Louise Bourgeois sculpture, private sponsors would likely absorb up to 
$90,000 for the project. The nine sculptures range in size and are crafted from bronze and 
stainless steel. Based on conversations with the Recreation and Park Department, Ms. Manton 
believes the plaza will be able to support the weight of the sculptures; however, the location of 
the crane will be the greatest concern. She will retain the same engineer who worked on a 
previous Civic Center art installation and who therefore studied the placement and weight-bearing 
capacity of the structural columns of the plaza to identify the exact location for the crane. Ms. 
Manton stated that Recreation and Park Department staff appeared supportive of the temporary 
installation during her meetings with them. She reported that if this Committee authorized her to 
proceed, the installation could be brought to the Recreation and Park Commission's meeting on 
March 6, 2008. Ms. Manton explained that she is exploring a couple of options for City funding. 



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Commissioner Przyblyski inquired about the anticipated May completion date. Ms. Manton 
explained that the installation may not occur until late spring or early summer, but there is a time 
constraint because of a festival planned for the plaza in October and because the lender is only 
interested in a four-month display. 

Commissioner Hunter expressed his enthusiasm about the project and the opportunity to present 
work of such high quality, and noted that Manolo Valdes represented Spain in the Venice Biennale 
ten years ago. 

Commissioner Rinder questioned the significance and meaning behind the temporary placement ol 
these monumental Spanish sculptures in the plaza. 

Commissioner Przyblyski explained that it is important for the Arts Commission to be nimble and 
entrepreneurial and to take advantage of possible funding sources. However, she stated that if 
there is a possibility to get private funding, then she would like to consider using these resources 
for funding artist Bill Fontana's proposal for City Hall. She believes that the burden is on the 
Commission to think about a cultural nexus that makes the installation of the Manolo Valdes 
sculptures more relevant and suggested contacting the Spanish Consulate. 

Commissioner Hunter stated that this work is not only beautiful and traditionally conceived but 
contemporary and powerful. He stated that since the plaza already has the structural ability to 
house the sculptures, it is a grand opportunity. 

Director of Cultural Affairs Luis Cancel stated that the use of plazas resonates with Spanish 
culture, and he liked that the proposed installation of these sculptures comes on the heels of the 
installation of the Louise Bourgeois sculpture. 

Ms. Shiffler suggested contacting other cultural institutions and museums in the Bay area to 
determine if there are any exhibitions concentrating on Spain or Spanish artists in order to 
incorporate it into a larger context. 

Commissioner Przyblyski commented that based on her experience, one of the major ways to get 
temporary projects is via private/public partnerships. 

Commissioner Rinder inquired about the placement of these two series. Ms. Manton explained that 
there will be five figures from the Las Meninas series and four busts from the Regina/Yvonne 
series; the figures will be lined up single file on the lawn, and the busts will be placed at each of 
the four corners of the plaza. 

THIS MOTION HAS BEEN AMENDED 

Motion: Motion to approve the temporary installation of nine bronze sculptures by artist Manolo 

ValdA©s in late spring or early summer 2008 for a total duration of four months based upon the 

assumption that all transportation, insurance and installation supervision and coordination costs 

will be privately sponsored. 

Moved: Hunter/Rinder 

Moscone Center West Project 

Public Art Program Director Jill Manton reported on the modification of an agreement with Pol-X 
West for the Moscone Center West project. She explained that she spoke with Ric Scofidio of Diller 
+ Scofidio, who said he has evaluated the redesign proposed by Pol-X West after considering the 
perspectives of an outside engineer and a City engineer consulting with the Arts Commission. 



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Diller + Scofidio wish to move forward with the proposed wheel and bogie redesign for the motion 
system of the Facsimile video project at Moscone Center West. Further, to the Arts Commission, 
she stated that Sheedy Crane will honor their previous commitment to do the work rigging and 
provide crane service at no charge, which Ms. Manton estimates to be worth about $15,000 to 
$20,000. She stated that manufacturing, shipping, and supervision costs will be about $60,000. 
Ms. Manton explained that she has asked Diller + Scofidio for a contribution toward the cost of the 
retrofit, but that remains undetermined. She is currently working on the contract modifications 
and will pursue every opportunity to secure more funding as there is a great need to move 
forward on this project. 

Motion: Motion to approve a modification of the agreement with Pol-X West to include an 
extension of the project completion date until December 31, 2010, an additional allocation of 
$60,000 for the fabrication, and shipping costs associated with the redesign of the motion system 
for the Facsimile artwork at Moscone Center West, the supervision of the removal of existing 
motion system components, the supervision of the installation of new motion system components, 
and the ongoing adjustments and repairs to the system. 
Moved: Rinder/Hunter 

Proposed Gift of World War II Memorial 

Public Art Program Deputy Director Susan Pontious reported on the proposed gift by the Russian 
American Veterans Legion of World War II of a memorial to the meeting of Russian and American 
troops at the Elba River on April 25, 1945. She introduced Ulan Palat as the proposer of the 
memorial. 

Mr. Palat presented a preliminary model of the memorial which included two soldiers, one 
American and one Russian, placed on top of a granite pedestal. The design references the meeting 
of American and Russian soldiers at the Elba River on April 25, 1945. He explained the importance 
of this memorial as an educational tool for younger generations and stated that he has received 
many signatures in support of this project. He also stated that he has potential funding sources in 
mind. Mr. Palat said that he would prefer to have the memorial located in Golden Gate Park, but if 
this was not possible, then he would work to find another place in San Francisco. He explained 
that his concept for the memorial includes two lights that will shine up from the ground to 
illuminate the figures at night, and an audio component in both Russian and English. In reference 
to questions from Commissioners about the model, Mr. Palat said that the height of the figures 
will vary depending on the location. If the memorial is installed near trees, it would be about 15 tc 
18 feet high, and if not, he envisions the height to be 7 or 8 feet. There is also an eternal flame 
emerging from a star-shaped pattern on the ground, as shown in the model. Mr. Palat also stated 
that the idea for the design of the meeting of two soldiers came from his own research of other 
monuments. 

Commissioner Hunter asked Mr. Palat if he had ever constructed figures like the ones shown in 
the model. Mr. Palat explained that he had not, he was a civil engineer by training, but he would 
certainly engage the services of an artist to create the design of the figures. 

Commissioner Przyblyski explained the Visual Arts Committee process for public comment to the 
members of the public and then requested public comment. 

David Gorodyansky expressed his support for the memorial and the dedication and passion of his 
friends who have been working on this idea for the last year and a half. He views the memorial as 
a symbol of respect for veterans who risked their lives, and stressed its importance both locally as 
well as globally. He currently serves as an advisor on the Technology Expert Council to Mayor 
Gavin Newsom and is very passionate about this project and believes the logistical issues can 



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happen quickly if the Commissioners provide their support for the project. 

Larisa Neymark introduced herself as an employee of the Mayor's Office who serves as a liaison to 
the Russian-American community and expressed her support for the importance of the memorial 
for future generations. She stated that she works closely with the local Russian community and 
they will all be happy to see such a memorial located in San Francisco. 

Vladimir Ermakov stated that he heard a statistic that around 200,000 Russians live in the Bay 
Area. He went on to say that Russians are a significant part of the community and many have 
relatives who lost their lives in the war, including himself. He expressed his desire to have a place 
to bring his children to educate them about the war and to honor those who lost their lives. He 
emphasized that this memorial acts as a symbol of friendship between Russians and Americans, 
and the installation of this memorial at this current period represents a new era of collaboration. 

Commissioner Przyblyski thanked members of the public for their comments. She then went on to 
explain that this issue was a difficult one and there is a responsibility that everyone shares to 
honor the presence and experiences of all San Franciscans. She then stated that there were some 
bureaucratic problems that impact this proposal: First, there is a moratorium on monuments in 
Golden Gate Park, so the likelihood of the Recreation and Parks Department accepting this 
proposal is very small; second, the Arts Commission has a moratorium on accepting gifts because 
of the limited funds available for maintenance of existing works in the collection; and third, having 
seen a number of projects under consideration by the Arts Commission, taking a position on this 
project is premature for a number of reasons. First, the model shown here is not far enough in the 
design process to provide Commissioners with a solid understanding of the memorial as a work of 
art. Second, the Committee normally accepts works of art only when issues about location have 
been resolved. Third, there is also the concern about raising money to build and care for the 
memorial. She said that this question of determining how to have a shared history remembered 
and honored still needs to be addressed. She expressed her inclination to decline to take action 
because it the item is not ready to adjudicate. 

Ms. Pontious stated that the artistic expression of the memorial needs to be developed by a 
professional and respected artist to give it the emotional impact it needs, because it is not enough 
just to have a concept. She suggested that the proposers first find an artist. Ms. Pontious also 
suggested that the proposers look at the ways in which other memorials have been developed anc 
installed in the City, for example, the Abraham Lincoln Brigade's memorial to the United States 
citizens who fought against fascism in the Spanish Civil War. That monument will soon be 
unveiled on the Embarcadero Plaza. 

Commissioner Przyblyski explained that the Commission is bound to accept projects as works of 
art, not memorials. She said that although it can be frustrating to go through this process, the 
process cannot be short-circuited. She encouraged the proposers to honor their commitment to 
the project and look at it with a plan in mind for this process: identify an artist; work with City 
agencies; establish a site; determine a budget; and develop a specific plan with the scale and 
materials. She said that after the proposers go through this process, the Committee would be 
happy to review it again. 

Mr. Gorodyansky responded that he thought logistics would be secondary and support for the 
concept would come first. He stated that he understood that all these issues need to be ironed 
out, but he did not feel like this was the meeting to do this. He asked the Commission to help 
them to figure out how to get the memorial developed and installed and urged them not to let 
bureaucracy kill the project as it is too important. 



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Commissioner Przyblyski clarified that the Arts Commission was their friend and the 
Commissioners were available to the public. She said that the good thing about procedures is that 
they ensure fairness to everyone. She explained that while she understands the urgency of their 
feelings, part of the challenge is how to consistently address the question of how history is 
honored. 

Commissioner Hunter encouraged proposers to contact Arts Commission staff for advice during 
the development process. He explained that the Commission does not have the authority to give 
them approval at this juncture in the project's conceptualization. 

Ms. Pontious cautioned that one of the reasons that there is a moratorium is that staff time is ver> 
limited, but she can certainly provide advice. 

Commissioner Przyblyski explained that the monument proposed by the Abraham Lincoln Brigade 
took many years to go through the process and the monument design is more contemporary. She 
suggested that proposers look at the process used in installing the bust of Harvey Milk in City Hall, 
which is a more traditional piece. She concluded that there are several examples of various 
processes and the availability of people to assist and advise. She concluded by saying that the 
Committee is going to decline to act at this meeting and this presentation will be seen as an 
informational meeting. 

San Francisco International Airport 

Public Art Program Deputy Director Susan Pontious presented the remodeling of Terminal Two of 
the San Francisco International Airport. She provided an update on the Secure Connector Project, 
which connects Terminal 3 to the International Terminal Boarding Area G. The Airport anticipates 
2,000 people daily will pass through the space. The interior of the connector is 9.5 feet from floor 
to ceiling with glass curtain walls and what she believes, based on the drawings, to be four niches, 
two on each side of the connector. She stated that the budget is $250,000 and the glass panels 
would be inserted into the frames. The connector walls are each about 80 feet long, with 20 feet 
between the columns, and the dark bands shown above the clear glass walls in the diagram 
represent opaque glass. Ms. Pontious stated that she hoped the budget would allow for an artwork 
throughout the length of the secure connector, including the glass panels as well as the niches. 
There will be a selection panel meeting at the end of March. 

Ms. Pontious went on to explain that the niches would ideally be used as an extension of the 
expression of the artwork on the glass walls. She said the niches are probably about 8 feet based 
on the overall 9.5 foot height of the interior. She said an alternative use for the niches would be 
for the placement of didactic materials or paintings from Terminal 2. 

Commissioner Hunter supported the idea of a sandblasted glass narrative for the secure connector 
and expressed his preference for the niches to be designed in dialogue with the narrative. 

Ms. Pontious then presented the redesign of the old International Terminal. She stated that the 
terminal will be inhabited by Virgin Airlines and the gates are supposed to be open in 30 months. 
Ms. Pontious explained that while Virgin desires a high-level finish and high-quality artworks, the 
opportunities are limited. She showed a diagram of the upper level of the terminal and stated that 
the front part would be gutted in ten years, so any projects sited for that location would either 
have to be relocated or designed to last for only ten years. Ms. Pontious is currently looking at 
possible sites, which include some glass opportunities and a proposed skylight above the 
concessions area towards the back. Blake Summers, Director of San Francisco Airport Museums, 
is interested in creating a site where media works could be shown as part of a rotating exhibit and 
Ms. Pontious is open to such a collaboration with the Airport Museums. 



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Commissioner Hunter expressed his support for this collaboration and the rotating exhibition of 
media works. 

Ms. Pontious then presented the first floor of the redesign and explained that the only public area 
is towards the front which has many columns. She requested that Commissioners contact her with 
for their ideas for artists. She stated that the selection process for the Secure Connector and 
Terminal 2 projects can be combined. In response to a question from Commissioner Rinder, Ms. 
Pontious responded that in terms of outreach, the opportunities are advertised in Artweek, on the 
Arts Commission website, to contacts in the Public Art Program mailing lists, and based on 
suggestions from the Commissioners as well as staff research. Also, when there is a quick 
turnaround time, artists may be selected from calls for other projects such as the Central Subway 
Art Program and be structured more as an invitational. 

Ms. Pontious stated that Ms. Manton and herself will be negotiating a new Memorandum of 
Understanding with the Airport in March. She explained that prior to the change of ordinance in 
1996 which increased the Percent for Art to 2 percent, the Arts Commission received 1.5 percent 
from the Airport. The Airport wants to arrange a sliding percentage scale, and in exchange, make 
up the difference in funds by providing for full maintenance of the Arts Commission works in the 
Airport. 

Mr. Cancel expressed his apprehension about a commitment based on operational costs. 

Ms. Pontious agreed that this needs to be quantified in a written agreement and also stated that 
the Airport is unique in that it has own staff with three conservators, so they may be well- 
equipped to undertake the maintenance responsibility. 

Commissioner Hunter also pointed out the advantage of having the Airport maintain the works in 
the terminals includes not having to work through all the requirements and security at the Airport. 

Ms, Pontious then presented the Rufino Tamayo artwork, originally installed in 1983, 30 feet high 
and 5,000 lbs., which needs to be painted and resited. Two potential sites have been identified. 
The first site is a triangular landscaped area which is adjacent to the roadway located on the 
south side of the old International Terminal and which will therefore be visible to visitors entering 
the terminal. As the Airport controls this location, no other approvals would be necessary. The 
other site is out at the south end of the airport and part of the Bay Trail. It is maintained by the 
Airport but is under the jurisdiction of the City of Millbrae. Ms. Pontious explained that Project 
Manager Ray Quesada said that the Airport planning staff would assist in the acquisition of 
approvals from the City of Millbrae and the Bay Conservation and Development Commission. She 
believes that there are both positive and negative elements to each site. The first site would make 
the work look like part of the Airport's collection. The second site is a bit removed from the airport 
but is more a traditionally bucolic site. 

Commissioner Rinder preferred the second site based on the images shown in the presentation. 

Commissioner Hunter expressed his desire for a site visit in order to view the actual surroundings. 

Commissioner Przyblyski said that action would be deferred. 

Junipero Serra Playground 

Project Manager Tonia Macneil said she would table this item for the next meeting. 



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9. Hamilton Recreation Center 

Project Manager Tonia Macneil presented the design development proposal for artwork by Horace 
Washington for the facade of Hamilton Recreation Center, located at Geary and Steiner Streets. 
She explained that Mr. Washington has been working with Karen Thompson, a mosaic artist, to 
make some changes to the original design. Ms. Thompson introduced glass tiles as well as a 
textural variation in the green areas of the design, thus increasing the visual complexity of the 
artwork. Ms. Macneil explained that while Mr. Washington is partial to the green hue he chose for 
the horizontal bands on the design, she thought the shade of green seemed to flatten the colors 
of the artwork. Ms. Macneil proposed changing the current hue to one with a bit of yellow that 
would be more compatible with the rest of the design. Ms. Macneil presented samples of the 
green-yellow tile (American Olean A30 Olive) and asked Commissioners for their feedback. 
Commissioners approved the motion contingent upon the revised design which includes the 
change in tile color. 

Motion: Motion to approve the design development of artwork by Horace Washington for the 
facade of Hamilton Recreation Center. 
Moved: Rinder/Hunter 

10. Branch Library Improvement Program 

Project Manager Judy Moran's request to have this item withdrawn was approved by the 
Committee. 

11. New Public Art Opportunity - SOMA Ancilliary Project 

Project Manager Regina Almaguer presented John Thomas, Landscape Architect, DPW BOE 
Landscape Architecture Division, to report on a new public art opportunity created by the removal 
of the Central Freeway, which includes developments along Pearl Street, Elgin Park, Stevenson 
Street, Jessie Street, and McCoppin Street, with a landscape medium on McCoppin between 
Valencia and Otis Streets, as well as a new small community park on McCoppin. He explained that 
Valencia Street would be repaved and the seed-inspired motif of the park would continue onto the 
street at the intersection of McCoppin and Valencia Streets and have a life of five to ten years 
before it fades away (as shown on the map he distributed). The community planning process 
consisted of several meetings from January to June of 2007, and he reported that the community 
appeared excited and supportive of the design. 

Mr. Thomas stated that the improvements would give the area identity, as well as dispersing 
traffic and improving the quality of life. He explained that the art enrichment element would be 
most appropriate for the community garden, which is sloped with a ramp on the south side that 
rises up to a level area for seating and plots. He stated that the garden would be completely 
enclosed with perimeter fencing and that the project has not yet been through the Civic Design 
process. 

Ms. Manton stated that Ms. Almaguer, Mr. Thomas, and she have discussed different approaches 
for the public art to be commissioned for the site, including a sculpture by a Burning Man artist 
created from recycled bicycles that could serve as a gateway for the park and reference the 
bicycle lane along Valencia Street; a traditional small-scale sculpture on a pedestal of at the park 
center; and the third possibility, which would involved a partnership with Southern Exposure, a 
nonprofit art space located a block from the new park. 

Commissioner Przyblyski expressed her support for this idea and suggested that they could have 
a partnership where the Arts Commission would have oversight of the project, and learn different 
ways to engage the community. Ms. Manton stated that she has not yet spoken to Southern 
Exposure Executive Director Courtney Fink about this idea. 



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Commissioner Przyblyski recommended taking the information presented on this new public art 
opportunity under advisement and expressed her interest in alternative models of engaging the 
community in the selection and installation of public artworks, 

12. Academy of Sciences 

Public Art Program Director Jill Manton reported that there would be a meeting on February 27, 
2008 at the Academy of Sciences and she would submit the agenda and report issues to members 
of the Committee. She stated that artist Maya Lin would be at the meeting and participants would 
be viewing a scale model of the wire landscape sculpture and examples of the video technologies 
under consideration, 

13. Baker Street Pump Station 

Project Manager Regina Almaguer reported on the artwork of Patrick Dougherty at the Baker 
Street Pump Station. She stated that there would be a meeting with the artist on March 11, 2008, 
to discuss the project and she will look for opportunities for students at the California College of 
the Arts and the San Francisco Art Institute to participate in the building process. 

14. Relocation of Bust of Mayor Angeio Rossi 

Public Art Program Director Manton updated the Commissioners on the relocation of the bust of 
Mayor Angeio Rossi. Ms. Manton explained the difficulty and challenge of finding a new location 
for the bust of Mayor Rossi in City Hall. She stated that one of the alternate sites most seriously 
under consideration is the Mayor's Rotunda. The Rotunda currently houses the busts of former 
Mayor George Moscone and his successor, Dianne Feinstein. Both of these busts are placed with 
their backs to the Mayor's Office and faces outwards into the Rotunda. There are two more 
locations for busts to be placed in the Rotunda which would face the Mayor's Office. Based on 
communication with the Chair of the City Hall Preservation Advisory Commission and with support 
from the Mayor's Office, the Arts Commission feels that the Rotunda is the most appropriate 
space for the bust of Mayor Rossi, which would soon be joined by the recently proposed bust of 
Mayor Sutro. The Arts Commission has the opportunity to direct the artist to design the bust of 
Mayor Sutro to be consistent with that of Mayor Rossi. Ms. Manton explained that this is an 
honorable location that is highly visible to the many people that visit the Mayor's Office on a daily 
basis. Ms. Manton explained that the Arts Commission does not yet have a motion for this item 
because the matter is still under discussion. 

Rose Marie Cleese, a granddaughter of Mayor Rossi, expressed her concerns about the relocation 
of the bust of Mayor Rossi. She first acknowledged James Haas for getting in touch with the Rossi 
family and Jill Manton for approaching her and working with her in trying to find an appropriate 
location for the bust. Ms. Cleese stated that she met with Ms. Manton twice, once at the end of 
December 2007 and once about two weeks before this meeting, and on neither occasion could 
they agree on a suitable location. Ms. Cleese explained that the bust of Mayor Rossi was dedicatee 
in 1949 by the Arts Commission and placed in a niche in the Goodlett Lobby on the first floor of 
City Hall, and returned to the same niche in 1999 after the retrofit of City Hall. In that location, 
the bust stood next to a statue of Mayor George Christopher, whom Mayor Rossi had mentored. 
Ms. Cleese stated that it was a couple of years later, sometime in early 2000, when the bust was 
moved without any discussion or public comment and probably without the knowledge of the Arts 
Commission prior to its relocation. She also expressed the belief that many busts were moved at 
that time. 

Ms. Cleese believes that the easiest resolution, based on conversations with Susan Goldstein, City 
Archivist, and other local historians, would be to return the bust of Mayor Rossi to its original 
location on the first floor of City Hall. Ms. Cleese explained that she had spoken to several people 



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who encouraged her to send an email to the Mayor. She then handed out packets to the 
Commissioners that included information about Major Rossi, including his funeral and dedicatory 
services, an article about his Works Progress Administration work, and the letter she addressed to 
the Mayor regarding her concerns. She realized that a certain amount of action has already taken 
place and expressed her reluctance in having to create more work for the Arts Commission, but 
stated that it was a difficult situation for her. She explained there would have been no problem if 
the bust had never been moved in the first place. 

Commissioner Przyblyski explained that as this was an informational meeting, action would not be 
taken at this time. She also spoke to the movement of the bust as example of "disappearing 
history" and to the lack of consistent policy when it comes to creating sites for honoring or 
remembering people and events. She emphasized the importance of determining how to deal with 
these issues consistently over time. 

Ms. Cleese asked for advice on what to do procedurally going forward. Commissioner Przyblyski 
responded that more research needed to be done and the Commissioners would like to be further 
briefed about this issue. Commissioner Przyblyski also encouraged Ms. Cleese to continue making 
her feelings and concerns heard. 

Ms. Cleese explained there were several historians in the Bay Area from whom she has received 
support. 

Commissioner Rinder stated that while the Mayor's Rotunda is not organized in chronological 
order, as are the busts on the first floor, the location is very illustrious, so while the context in 
which it is displayed is different, the placement is still honorific. 

Ms. Cleese explained that she feels as though the bust was moved from a highly visible location to 
a less visible one. She stated that Angelo Rossi was a significant mayor who led the city through 
hard times and fought relentlessly for WPA funds. She also stated that a book about his legacy is 
expected to be published soon, and since little information about him exists, the movement of his 
bust is an additional loss in terms of visibility. She reiterated her belief that while the Rotunda is a 
nice location, she believes it is hidden away and invisible to the public. 

Ms. Manton stated that the Rotunda is perhaps the most ceremonial place in City Hall because it is 
outside the Mayor's Office. 

Commissioner Przyblyski explained the need for a plan that determines where busts of mayors 
and supervisors should be placed and the way in which the busts should be organized, for 
example, by historical progression. She stated that when the debate is about one person and his 
legacy then trouble arises because the judgment of the importance of an individual is subjective. 

Ms. Cleese explained that she wants the bust to have high visibility so that people can be curious 
and, therefore, learn more about him. 

Mr. Cancel explained that while he has come into the conversation late, he also does not want the 
legacy of Mayor Rossi to be diminished. He expressed that the placement of the bust in the 
Rotunda positions it in a location with the highest traffic because the Mayor's office is a very 
prominent place. Ms. Manton confirmed that signage on the pedestal provides information about 
his life and legacy and there are also daily guided tours through the Rotunda for the general 
public and tourists. 

Mr. Cancel asked about the time constraint for determining a location. Ms. Manton explained that 



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the dedication ceremony for the bust of former City Supervisor Harvey Milk will be on May 22, 
2008, and the goal is to find an appropriate place before then. Mr, Cancel asked Ms. Cleese if she 
would have any objection to having the bust of Mayor Rossi placed in a temporary location for the 
dedication ceremony. 

Ms. Cleese responded that she would agree only if there is some indication of the probability of 
securing an agreed-upon location within a six-month timeframe. Mr. Cancel said that the Arts 
Commission could not give her this assurance. 

Ms. Cleese stated that she wanted to be informed of developments going forward and Ms. Manton 
offered to contact her when the topic is on the agenda of any upcoming meeting. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that the Committee is not well-equipped to enter into negotiations 
regarding the placement of the bust at this time. She requested to have the item reagendized in 
two months, in April, for an update about the location and progress on the situation. 
Commissioner Przyblyski encouraged Ms. Cleese and her contacts of historians and archivists to 
submit her comments. 

15. Randall Museum 

Project Manager Regina Almaguer stated that the artist selection panel for the Randall Museum 
Art Project will meet on March 6, 2008, and the proposals of the four artists/artist teams are 
currently available for viewing. 

16. New Business 

There was no new business. 

17. Old Business 

Ms. Manton stated that an update on the relocation of the Rabbinoid sculpture by Gerald 
Heffernon would be addressed at the next Visual Arts Committee meeting. 

Ms. Manton stated that the art project at Sava Pool by Brian Goggin called Guideposts is 
progressing well so far. 

18. Adjournment 

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 5:33 pm. 

MC 1/15/2008 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts Commission office, 25 

Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during regular business hours. INFO: Mary 

Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic devices are 

prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the removal from the meeting of 

any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell phone, pager, or other similar sound-producing 

electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or administrative action 

may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San Francisco Campaign and Governmental 

Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register and report lobbying activity. For more information 



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about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 
Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 
h ttp://www. sf gov , o rg/et h ics . 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. Commissions, 

boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct the people's business. This 

ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the people and that City operations are open 

to the people's review. For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report 

a violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine 

Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by 

phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at sotf@sfgov.org. 

Citizens interested in obtaining a free copy of the Sunshine Ordinance can request a copy from Mr. 

Darby or by printing Chapter 67 of the San Francisco Administrative Code on the Internet, 

http://www.sfgov.org/sunshine/. 



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STAFF REPORTS 

Date: Feb. 11,2008 

To: The Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Susan Pontious 

Re: Consent Calendar - Harvey Milk Memorial 

On Jan. 30, 2008, Rob Firmin of the artist team Daub, Firmin and Hendrickson Sculpture Group 
("DFH") met with Jill Manton, Joey Cain (of the Harvey Milk City Hall Memorial Committee) 
and me to present the artists' recommendation for the granite color for the sculpture base, the 
text typeface, and fill treatment for the text. Mr. Firmin presented samples of three different 
granite colors with different sandblasted text typeface and different infill treatments. 

The granites included: Carnelian, Amber Gold and Autumn Brown. 

The lettering infill tests included: real-gold leaf, lithochrome gold, lithochrome light (two 

shades) and brown. 

Typefaces included: Optima bold and Optima regular. 

We were all in agreement that Autumn Brown granite provided a warm, appealing color while 
giving the best contrast for the lettering. 

Optima regular was the typeface selected with real-gold infill. It was agreed that sandblasted text 
was acceptable. 



DATE: February 20, 2008 

TO: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Tonia Macneil 



Project: Broadway Streetscape Improvements 

Location: Broadway at Columbus 

Project: Language of the Birds 

Artist: Brian Goggin 

Brian Goggin will present the design development mockup, model, and plans of his artwork, 
Language of the Birds. 

Over the last 1 5 months, since first presenting his proposal, Mr. Goggin has been negotiating his 
contract and, along with his collaborator Dorka Keehn, working on design development. As 
previously reported, they have been successful in raising most of the additional funds to create 
the entire original vision of 26 book/birds. In addition, they have persuaded SFMOMA to 
sponsor a one-time performance at which the words for the sidewalk text element will be laid out 
while reading the phrases selected from 50-odd books suggested by the North Beach/Chinatown 
community as well as the ancient Sufi poem Language of the Birds. 

Mr. Goggin is currently completing final design. Staff approval of construction documents will 
be based on a lighting analysis or on-site lighting test to gauge the effect of the lighting on the 
residents of the adjacent building, and on submission of structural engineering drawings and 
calculations, among other items. Construction at Broadway and Columbus will begin on 
February 25. The artwork may be installed as early as September 2008. 

In the interest of a concise presentation and fruitful discussion, below is the artist's written 
design development description of the proposal. 






LANGUAGE OF THE BIRDS 

Written Specifications of Materials, Production and Installation Methods 
Prepared by Brian Goggin and Dorka Keehn 

1. Book making process: 

The sculpted books are made with outdoor industrial sign quality UV-rated white polycarbonate 
shaped by both vacuforming, for the interior page forms, and hot slump fonning for the exterior 
bindings. The page forms are then hand-tooled to fit the individual bindings. The lighting units 
are made with wide-beam LED lights mounted to the interior of the forms so the light reflects off 
page forms to illuminate the books. The vacuformed elements are fastened to the binding with 
both a UV-rated high quality silicon and internal plastic fasteners made with cemented and 
screwed clear polycarbonate tabs. The silicon will seal the entire unit to ensure water and dirt do 
not enter the interior cavity. We will attach the books to stainless steel aircraft cables using 
stainless steel eyebolts, washers and lock-tight secured nuts. 

2. Plaza floor: 

We will create the pattern for the embedded word layout for the plaza in the SFMOMA Atrium. 
To accomplish this, we will enlarge the scanned text that we have researched from locally related 
texts (see attachment I), to the exact size we would like them to appear on the flooring. We will 
print and cut out phrases into approximately 850 individual words with varying fonts from the 
original publications. We will layout the 59 three-foot by three-foot pavers of the plaza floor 
with butcher paper, then stand above the pattern on the open staircase, from the height the books 
will hang above the plaza, and scatter a flurry of printed words into the air. The words will flutter 
down and randomly land on the butcher paper grid, some right side up, others upside down. We 
will adhere them where they land. Depending on time constraints, part or all of the following 
would either be done on location at SFMOMA or at our studio: cut the pattern up into the three- 
foot by three-foot paver sections, map how the sections fit together, and photograph the sections. 

We will provide digital files of all sidewalk panel designs illustrating exact placement and font 
for all words. The San Francisco DPW-hired contractor will make a stencil for each three-foot by 
three-foot panel. We will work with the contractor to locate all the stencils in the proper 
locations, after which the contractor will sandblast all the words into the dark pavement. The 
contractor will fill all the cavities with a white epoxy. After the contractor has finished this step, 
we will work with him to remove all the stencils and we will inspect all the word inlays. If there 
are any imperfections we will work with the contractor to fix them. 

3. Maintenance: 

The books are made with exterior industrial sign quality polycarbonate. Little maintenance will 
be required. If dust or dirt has built up after some time, the books may be cleaned with soap and 
water. The LEDs are estimated to last over 100,000 hours. The LEDs will be dimmed below 
their full capacity to extend their life and vary the lighting effects. When servicing is required, 
the page forms can be simply removed by slicing the silicone with a razor blade and unscrewing 
one of the vacuformed page forms to allow replacement of the LED light unit. The page form 



should then be re-sealed by screwing it back in place and replacing the silicon around the seal. 
Areas where silicon is not required should be taped off to keep the line of the silicon minimal 
and straight. 

4. Transportation plan: 

John Law, the installation contractor, will bring all materials and art pieces to the site for 
installation. This will include all rigging supplies, sculpted books, and all installation materials. 
The City will provide barricades and any ADA access requirements. 

5. Installment plan: 

a. Rigging: 

The plaza surface will be protected with plywood while installing the rigging and sculpted 
illuminated books. We will measure, number and cut all cables on-site. Using the maquette of the 
sculpture, we will plot the x,y,z placement coordinates for the books on and above the plaza 
floor. On the ground, we will attach the cables to rigging rings using thimbles. The rings will be 
placed at all cable junctions directly above each book. We will use an articulated boom lift to rig 
up the cabling system and hang and wire the sculptures. John Law, our rigging contractor, and 
his assistant, Karl Gillick, will raise the cables to the appropriate heights per our direction. The 
cables will attach to the street lamps and traffic signal poles using standard SF Muni cable 
attachment bands. The rigging crew will attach each book to the three cables that join at the 
matching rigging ring. This triangulated hanging attachment will mitigate swing, thus stabilizing 
the books. 

b. Electrical: 

All books are wired to a light controller unit sealed in a weatherproof box mounted to the 
exterior of one of the light poles. We will work with the DPW electrician to install the 
weatherproof box onto one of the four light poles. This box will contain the light controller 
circuitry. The electrical wires, in UV-protected sleeves, will come out of the top of the books and 
run along the cables to the box. Our installation team and electrician will run the wires from the 
books to the suspension rigging, and attach the wiring to the cables with UV-rated zip ties. Once 
reaching the closest light or signal pole, the electrical wires will run through a conduit inside the 
light and traffic signal poles. Depending on the distance from the box, some electrical wires will 
run through a conduit under the plaza floor. The DPW electrician will, at DPW cost, wire the 
controller box to the City power line. 

6. Plaque: 

This plaque will be etched on bronze or zinc plate and formed to fit on a traffic light pole or wall 
and will be approximately 18" long x 9" wide. 






Date: February 1 1 , 2008 

To: The Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Jill Manton, Program Director, Public Art 

Re: Report for Moscone Center West Project 

Moscone West - Facsimile Project by Diller and Scofidio 

After speaking with both Heming Tsueh of DPW and Stephen Hopkins, engineering consultant, 
Ric Scofidio of Diller and Scofidio decided that he wished to proceed with the proposed redesign 
of the motion system as proposed by Pol-X West. The City Attorney believes that the Arts 
Commission should contract directly with Pol-X to perform this work. Our Senior Accountant 
has advised me that the existing contract with Pol-X may be re-activated through a contract 
modification. 

The parts will be manufactured and installed under Pol-X's supervision. Sheedy Crane will 
provide the crane and labor needed to remove the existing motion system components and install 
the new components. I had previously negotiated this arrangement with Sheedy over a year ago. 
I am pleased to report that the President of Sheedy Crane said that he will honor his word and 
will not charge for this work. 

The work will likely cost approximately $50,000. Even with Diller and Scofidio forfeiting their 
final payment of approximately $ 1 0,000 and with no charge for the Sheedy work, we still have a 
funding deficit of $40,000 that I am working to resolve. 

I hope to have an update for you at the meeting. 



Date: Jan. 1,2008 

To: The Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Susan Pontious 

Re: Proposed Gift from Russian American Veterans Legion 

Description : The Russian American Veterans Legion is proposing a memorial commemorating 
the Russian and American alliance in fighting WWII, specifically the meeting at Elba River in 
German territory on April 25, 1945. The group proposes to place the monument facing Ocean 
Beach in Golden Gate Park. The group has submitted a packet of signed petitions supporting the 
monument, as well as letters of support from the American Legion (Eighth District) and the State 
Department of Veterans Affairs. 

The proposed monument is 15-18' tall, with a 4' x 8' foundation. It would depict two bronze 
soldiers (one Russian and the other American) shaking hands with each other on top of the 
monument. They will be standing on a granite letter "V" for victory. There will be text on the 
pedestal describing the event being memorialized. The committee has submitted a three- 
dimensional maquette of the monument. 

They have obtained a cost estimate from Red Pod, Inc. of $75,000 for design, materials, and 
shipping. Costs not included in Red Pod's estimate are the costs of structural engineering, 
sculpture footings, installation, fees and permits, and Arts Commission staff administration costs 
and a maintenance endowment. 



Staff Recommendation : The worthiness of the subject notwithstanding, it is the staff 
recommendation that this proposed monument be declined for the following reasons. 

1. The monument does not meet the Commission's mission and criteria for artworks it 
accepts into the collection because the primary identity of this monument is historical, 
and not as a work of art. The proposal, as reflected in the maquette, does not reflect the 
singular artistic vision of a professional artist and as such, does not possess inherent 
aesthetic quality. As per the Civic Art Collection guidelines, inherent aesthetic quality is 
the primary requirement for the acceptance of artworks into the Civic Art Collection. 

2. The proposed monument is not within the Commission's collection priorities in that it is 
not the work of a Bay Area or California artist, or of a national or international artist of 
note. Secondly, the historical event it honors is not specific to San Francisco history, 
other than that San Francisco is the home to many WWII veterans and a Russian 
immigrant population. 

3. The Commission has a moratorium on accepting gifts of art, particularly major 
monuments, due to the lack of staff resources to manage such projects. Despite the recent 
hiring of a Senior Registrar, the conditions that prompted the Commission to pass this 



resolution still exist. Although ostensibly a gift, a major monument like the one proposed 
nonetheless incurs significant costs in Art Commission staff time. The recent example of 
the Abraham Lincoln Brigade monument is an excellent case in point. Some of the work 
required involves reviewing and critiquing proposed designs, identification of appropriate 
sites, negotiation with the City department having jurisdiction over the site, guiding the 
donors through the City approval and permit process with both the Arts Commission and 
other City agencies, negotiation for the maintenance endowment, execution of complex 
three-party memorandums of understanding, and contractual agreements, to name a few. 
The resources of our collections management staff are already stretched meeting current 
demands of managing the critical maintenance and conservation needs of the existing 
collection, and trying to achieve the current priority goal of completing and documenting 
an inventory of the City's collection. Likewise, the public art staff is equally 
overextended. 

The proposed site for the memorial is unlikely to be viable. The Recreation and Park 
Commission currently has a moratorium on sculptures and memorials in Golden Gate 
Park. While this is not the Arts Commission's purview, it nonetheless impacts the 
feasibility of this project as proposed. 



Date: February 11, 2008 

To: The Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Jill Manton, Program Director, Public Art 

Re: Relocation of bust of Mayor Angelo Rossi 

Harvey Milk Bust Location/Mayor Rossi Bust Relocation 

The City Hall Preservation Advisory Commission voted to approve the location proposed for the 
Harvey Milk bust in the Van Ness lobby of City Hall on a south-facing wall adjacent to the 
elevators. 

There was a significant amount of discussion about the need for a Master Plan and guidelines 
that deal with the architecture of the building, historical context and lighting. Arts Commission 
staff was asked to take the lead in developing these guidelines. 

Mayor Rossi's family representative stated her concern that an appropriate location needs to be 
identified for the Rossi bust which will be moved to accommodate the Harvey Milk bust. At a 
subsequent meeting with staff from the Mayor's Office about this matter, I was advised of the 
Mayor's Office preference to place both the Rossi bust and the proposed bust of Adolph Sutro in 
the Mayor's Rotunda. Arts Commission staff supports this proposed location and recommends 
that the Sutro bust be designed to be compatible with the scale of the Rossi to maintain 
symmetry and balance in the placement. 









Date: February 1 1 , 2008 

To: The Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Jill Manton, Program Director, Public Art 

Re: Report on Sava Pool 

Sava Pool 

Recreation and Park staff organized a small meeting of community members regarding the 
proposal to place Brian Goggin's sculpture entitled Guidepost in the lawn area to the north of the 
pool. I am pleased to report that the four individuals at this meeting were extremely enthusiastic 
about the proposal. It was a relief to have this kind of response after dealing with the former 
objections regarding this work at the Moscone Recreation Center. One of the individuals I met 
was a retired curator from the DeMenil Museum in Houston who might be a candidate for a 
future selection panel. 

We also arranged for a conservator to meet with Mr. Goggin and Senior Registrar Allison 
Cummings to discuss whether any changes needed to be made to the materials that would be 
used in the sculpture given its proximity to the ocean and the salt air and fog that characterizes 
the environment. 

The next step in the process will involve a letter to the residents of the housing immediately 
adjacent to the park site. Assuming there are not major objections or obstacles that arise, we will 
proceed with the contracting process. 



This plaque will be etched on bronze plate and formed to fit on a traffic light pole or wall and 
will be approximately 18" long x 9" wide. 



LANGUAGE OF THE BIRDS 

2008 

BY BRIAN GOGGIN WITH DORKA KEEHN 

COMMISSIONED BY THE SAN FRANCISCO ARTS COMMISSION 

WITH ADDITIONAL FUNDING PROVIDED BY: 

ILLUMINATION 

Black Rock Arts Foundation 

Linda & Jon Gruber 

BOOKS 

Lori Bonn 

Peter & Mimi Buckley 

Glenn & April Bucksbaum 

Carla & David Crane 

Stanley Fields 

Elise & Tule Friedman 

Susann Kellison & Donald Putnam Jr. 

Gary Lippman 

Nion McEvoy 

Anna & Rob McKay 

Simon Snellgrove 

PHRASES 

Calzone's 

Chris Desser & Kirk MacWald 

Patti & Bert Parlee & Sharon Dittmer 

Jerome & Hillary Simon 

Tin Man Fund 

David & Charlotte Winton 

WORDS 

Beach Blanket Babylon 

Rick Gray 

John & Augusta Stewart 

Chiara Vietor 



AUTHORS 



ATTACHMENT I 



A. D. Winans 
Allen Ginsberg 

Anthony W. Lee 

Armistead Maupin 

Arnold Gen the 

Beach Blanket Babylon 

Bill Margolis 

Bob Kaufman 

C.Y Lee 

Charles Bukowski 

Charles Caldwell Dobie 

Charles McCabe, Esq. 

Corinne K. Hoexter 

David Amram 

Deanna Paoli Gumina 

Diane Di Prima 

Dick Boyd 

Eric Barker 

Father AR Bandini 

Francis Coppola 

Gary Snyder 

Genny Lim 

George Tsongas 

Gregory Corso 

Harold Norse 

Herb Gold 

Him Mark Lai 

Howard Hart 

J. Feishing Wong 

Jack Hirshman 

Jack Micheline 

Jade Snow Wong 

James Brook, Chris Carlsson & 

Nancy J. Peters 

James Broughton 

Jerry Kamstra 

Joanne Kyger 

John Weiners 

Judy Yung 

Kathleen Norris 

Kaye McDonough 

Kenneth Patchen 

Kirby Doyle 

Lai, Lim & Yung 

Laurence Ferlinghetti 

Laurence Yep 



Leandre Kandel 

Lew Welch 

Lewis Ellingham & Kevin Killian 

Marlon K. Horn 

Marsha Campbell 

mary fabilli 

Maya Angelou 

Michael McClure 

Nanying Stella Wong 

Neeli Cherkovski 

Paolo Pallavicini 

Paul Vangelisti 

Pete Winslow 

Philip Lamantia 

Robert Carson 

Ron Fimrite 

Ruth Weiss 

Ruthanne Lum McCunn 

Sara Bard Field 

Thomas Sanchez 

Thomas W. Chinn 

Tseng Ta-yu 

Valenti Angelo 

Vita Italiana 

William Everson 

William Poy Lee 






>The Language of Birds" /DPW paving design 




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•• i'x3"povei with word details 



s 



(59) 3'x }' pavers with word details 



time 






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parla 



Rose Marie Cleese to Visual Arts Committee, Wednesday, 2/20/08, 
regarding the City Hall relocation of the Angelo J. Rossi bust 

Committee members, thank you for giving me the opportunity to 
address you on the issue of the relocation of the Angelo J. Rossi 
bust. First, I want to acknowledge James Haas of the City Hall 
Preservation Advisory Commission 

for proposing that someone get in touch with the Rossi family 
back when the discussion first arose about moving his bust. And I 
want very much to thank Jill Manton, Director of Public Art for 
the Art Commission, for her dogged efforts in finding me and then 
meeting with me at City Hall on two occasions with Ellen Schumer 
to discuss options for the location of the Rossi bust. 

The unfortunate thing is that Jill didn't find me until some time 
last fall and we didn't meet until late in December and then 
earlier this month. We were never able to agree on a suitable 
location for his bust that was commensurate with his legacy to 
the City— that either it stay where it is or in niche nearby or 
be moved back to the location where it resided for half a century 
after its dedication in 1949 until it was inexplicably moved 
sometime after the year 2000 to its present location. On February 
7th the Advisory Commission moved to approve the location of the 
Milk bust in the niche currently occupied by the Rossi bust, 
without a resolution on the disposition of the Rossi bust. 

The main reason for the current difficult situation, I believe, 
is the fact that all the parties that should have been informed 
weren't aware that the relocation was being considered until just 
recently. I fully recognize and concur with the importance of 
Supervisor Milk's place in the City's history and the urgency of 
a resolution to this issue due to the May 22nd dedication. Milk 
is a significant figure in the history of San Francisco. But so 
is Angelo Rossi. I am hoping that one of the options that I and 
others consider viable can be agreed upon before the bust 
placements are set in stone so that this doesn't burgeon into a 
conflict that none of us wants. 

With the committee's permission, I'd like to share with you an e- 
mail I sent to Mayor Newsom yesterday that pretty much sums up 
what I wanted to say to you today. 

To the Honorable Gavin Newsom, Mayor of San Francisco 

Dear Mayor Newsom, 

I am writing you because of a situation that has developed over the last several months 
regarding the placement of busts in City Hall. As you are probably aware, a bust of 
Harvey Milk is to be dedicated in City Hall on his birthday, May 22nd. 

The reason I'm writing you is that the proposed location of the Milk bust is where the 
bust of former Mayor Angelo Rossi currently sits. Rossi, who is my grandfather, was 
mayor of San Francisco for 13 years (from 1931 to 1944), one of the most challenging 
and turbulent, yet exuberant, eras of the City's history (years marked by the end of 
Prohibition, the Depression, labor strife, building of the bridges, Pearl Harbor, WWII, 



etc.)- Many of today's most cherished corners of the City were the result of the WPA 
and CCC funds he fought relentlessly to obtain for the City nearly three quarters of a 
century ago. He also kept the City in the black all through the Depression while 
maintaining the lowest tax rate of any U.S. city of comparable size. Many other mayors, 
including New York's Fiorello LaGuardia, sought his counsel. He was compassionate, 
progressive, fair, honest, and the first mayor of Italian descent among the 10 largest 
U.S. cities. Talk to a broad cross-section of native San Franciscans in their 80s and 90s 
and you'll learn how highly regarded he was. 

I was not informed of the bust shuffling until late last fall after many discussions had 
already taken place. I am very concerned about the rush to place the Milk bust in a spot 
where there has been no resolution on where the bust that is already there should 
deservedly go. I feel that this did not go through the public due diligence that it 
deserved. There are many people and organizations throughout the community who 
care about the legacy of Angelo Rossi and are concerned about the outcome of this. 
Can you advise me on how this can best be resolved to the satisfaction of all parties 
involved? 

I don't want to see this become some big controversy. Both of these men's legacies 
deserve better than some tempest in a teapot. I am in total agreement that Harvey Milk 
deserves this honor. The issue is that Angelo Rossi deserves to retain his prominent 
place in the halls of San Francisco's City Hall. I'd be happy to talk with you about this 
further. My number is 650-341-2773. I look forward to your reply. 

Regards, Rose Marie Cleese 

This morning I received an e-mail from a Silicon Valley- 
leadership consultant who had this to say: Quote 
Thanks for updating me on the Rossi bust progress . May I suggest that 
you drive a stake in the ground on the issue of an appropriate process 
to protect San Francisco history for its people and keep it from 
getting lost? This is not just about visual arts, it's about the 
heritage of the people of the city. The now-you-see-it-now-you-don' t 
story of the city, especially for the currently less-known but 
extremely important pieces that explain how the City became what it is 
and the people who created it — well, that's just unacceptable. End- 
quote 

I hope that this issue can have a win-win resolution for all 
concerned and that the historical component can be given the 
weight it deserves. There would be many more people here today to 
weigh in on this issue if I had known about this meeting sooner 
than last weekend. Several historians and representatives from 
various civic organizations wanted to attend but they were unable 
to rearrange their schedules on such short notice. In the 
meantime, I have copies of a couple of documents that I was able 
to locate, somewhat hurriedly, that I would like to give all the 
members of this committee so that you can know something of 
Rossi's legacy, how his bust came to be, and why it's so 
important to me and so many others as to its location in the City 
Hall of the city that he devoted his life to. Thank you so much 
for your time. 



The 



Argonaut 

Journal of the San Francisco Museum and Historical Society 




Volume 14 No. 1 



Summer 2003 



W.P.A. CONSTRUCTION IN 

SAN FRANCISCO (1935-1942) 



By Timothy Keegan 



n his annual message to Congress on January 4, 
1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt made 
the following declaration: 

The lessons of history, confirmed by 
the evidence immediately before me, 
show conclusively that continued 
dependence upon relief induces a spiri- 
tual and moral disintegration 
fundamentally destructive to the 
national fiber. To dole out relief in this 
way is to administer a narcotic, a subtle 
destroyer of the human spirit... Work 
must be found for able-bodied but des- 
titute workers... We must preserve not 
only the bodies of the unemployed 
from destruction but also their self- 
respect, their self-reliance and courage 
and determination. ..The Federal 
Government must and shall quit this 
business of relief. 

On May 6, 1935, with the placement of his sig- 
nature on Executive Order No. 7034, President 
Roosevelt honored his promise by creating one 
of the most beneficial relief programs in the 
history of our country, the Works Progress 
Administration. 

Sweeping in its scope (everything from road 
construction to mural and other public art com- 
missions, building outhouses in rural areas, and 
instructing housewives in the domestic sciences 
was covered under the program), the Works 
Progress Administration (W.P.A.) was also 



remarkable in its simplicity. Cities and towns all 
over the country had two desperate desires: to get 
their citizens back to work, and to shore up the 
infrastructural needs of their communities that 
had languished since the onset of the Great 
Depression in 1929. 

The guidelines for the program were also rela- 
tively simple. In order to be employed by the 
W.P.A. one had to be at least eighteen years old, 
unemployed and not on relief, physically fit, and 
in possession of the work skills required for the 
job undertaken. Only one person per family 
could work for the W.P.A. and, when candidates 
seemed equally matched, preference was to be 
given to veterans, their widows (unless remar- 
ried), and the wives of unemployed veterans. 

The community seeking assistance supplied the 
labor and materials, and the federal government 
paid the majority of a project's expenses (the dif- 
ference was paid by the requesting community, or 
"sponsor"; in California's case, the average split 
was approximately 67.2% / 32.8%). Once a pro- 
ject was complete, it was the sole possession and 
responsibility of the sponsor community. 
Honoring the separation of church and state, the 
W.P.A. was prohibited from constructing houses 
of worship. Funding was also to be used strictly 
for non-military purposes, but as the United 
States edged closer to World War II those lines 
were inevitably blurred. 

San Francisco, as battered by the Great 
Depression as any other American city, was anx- 
ious to participate in the President's new relief 



the W.P.A. If it is possible to get a permit 
to lanJ the employees on the government 

Jock, which is seldom used, it would he 
much. ..safer and also situated near to 
work... We hcreat submit our figures on a 
daily basis of carrying W.P.A. employees 
from foot of Buchanan Street, San 
Francisco, to Material Deck on Mann side. 

The rate for carrying 100 passengers was 18 
cent-* per round trip, per passenger. 

MAYOR ANGELO ROSSI 

No account of the W.P.A. 's history in San 
Francisco would be complete without acknowl- 
edging Mayor Angelo Rossi's contributions to 
these programs. A native of California 
(Volcano), his family moved to San Francisco 
when he was twelve, and his entire adult life was 
spent in public service to the city (Director of the 
Downtown Association; Board member of the 
Playground Commission; member of the Board of 
Supervisors; Mayor). 

As Mayor of San Francisco from 1931 to 1944, 
Rossi shepherded the city through the economic 
anJ psychological difficulties of the entirety oi 
the Great Depression. The San Francisco News 
reported on December 19, 1932 that San 
Francisco was the only major city in the United 
States to end the year with a treasury surplus, and, 
the year before, had even managed ro reduce 
taxes. 

Mayor Rossi, though a Republican, was a dedi- 
cated proponent of the W.P.A. An Ociobei 26, 
1935 headline in the San Francisco Examiner 
declared "Rossi Given Credit For WPA Wages In 
S.F." and went on to explain: 

On the eve of today's meeting of 200 labor 
leaders to discuss WPA wage scales in 
. California, Mayor Rossi yesterday was 
given full credit tor establishment of pre- 
vailing wages on Federal projects 
here... The tribute came from Frank Y. 
McLaughlin, State WPA administrator, 
who said: "Neither the administration as a 
whole, nor I as an individual, deserves the 



credit for the higher wage scale in San 
Francisco. That credit belongs entirely to 
Mayor Rossi." 

The acquisition of W.P.A. funds is somewhat 
analogous to organizations' modern c\.\\ quest for 
grant money - there is only SO much money to go 
around, and only those who ask the right ques- 
tions and open the right doors are the recipients 
of the much sought— after funds. Mayor Rossi was 
indefatigable in his quest for federal funds for city 
projects. San Francisco newspapers throughout 
his years as mayor carry innumerable references of 
his trips to Washington. D.C. in pursuit of W.P.A. 
funding. 

In his Annual Message of January 8, 19^6, 
Mayor Rossi writes: 

1 am happy to announce that nearly all 
citizens of San Francisco eligible under 
the Works Progress Administration, are 
now engaged in gainful occupation of a 
character commensurate with their abili- 
ties and previous business and professional 
training. San Francisco, at this tune, is 
the only one of the Pacific Coast munici- 
palities which has been able to comply 
fully with the Federal program. The 
morale of those affected lias been 
admirably maintained and the added pay- 
rolls are giving great stimulus to all local 
business interests and enterprises. 

San Francisco was fortunate xo have such a 
passionately dedicated advocate of the W.P.A. 
in City Hall during the agency's brief years of 
service. 

Zoological Gardens/ 
Aquatic Park 

San Francisco's two most ambitious original 
W.P.A. undertakings book-end the city with 
almost perfect symmetry - Aquatic Park in the 
northeast corner, and the San Francisco Zoo in 
the southwest. They also supplied the city with 
the W.P.A. era's most controversial moments in 
San Francisco. 



11 






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sfac: March 19, 2008 Page 1 of 3 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

March 1.9, 2008 



VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, March 19, 2008 

3:00 p.m. 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 
MAR 1 7 2C08 



Agenda SAN FRANCISCO 

1. Consent PUBLIC LIBRARY 

1. Motion to approve an amendment to increase the budget for Scott Donahue's contract 
#POAR04000098 for the design, fabrication and installation of artworks for the Richmond Branch 
Library by an amount not to exceed $1,000, for a new contract total amount not to exceed 
$36,000, for additionally required engineering services regarding the safety of the artwork. 

2. Motion to acknowledge, accept with gratitude, and expend a gift of $2,000 from Friends of 
Duboce Park and $1,500 from Hal Fischer and an anonymous donor for the fabrication and 
installation of an artwork designed by Susan Schwartzenberg and Michael Davis of a quotation 
from Harvey Milk on the east-facing wall of the Harvey Milk Center for Recreational Arts. 

2. Laguna Honda Hospital 

Susan Pontious 

Report on the work of artist Cliff Garten at Laguna Honda Hospital. 

Motion: Motion to approve revised design in bronze for Cliff Garten's sculptural handrails. 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into an agreement with Cliff 
Garten for $238,108 to fabricate, transport and install 604 linear feet of bronze sculptural 
handrails. 

3. Harvey Milk Memorial Bust 

Jill Man ton 
Staff Report 

Discussion and staff report on the proposed location of the Harvey Milk Memorial Bust in City Hall. 

Motion: Motion to rescind resolution 1001-07-278 approving location proposal for the Harvey Milk 
Memorial sculpture on a south-facing wall in the Van Ness lobby of City Hall pending approval of 
the site by the Harvey Milk City Hall Memorial Committee and the City Hall Preservation Advisory 
Committee. 

Motion: Motion to approve the placement of the Harvey Milk memorial bust in the Board of 
Supervisors Ceremonial Rotunda in City Hall. 

4. Academy of Sciences 

Jill Manton 

Report on the progress of artist Maya Lin's public art project. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final design proposal and budget submitted by Maya Lin for the 
suspended wire landscape sculpture to be fabricated from marine grade stainless steel tubing 



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approximately 5/8 inches in diameter to be installed in the exterior West Terrace of the Academy 
of Sciences for an amount not to exceed $275,000 including fabrication, transportation and 
installation. 

5. Lake Merced Temporary Art in Natural Settings 

Regina Almaguer 

Presentation by artist John Melvin on the Lake Merced Temporary Art in Natural Settings project. 

Motion: Motion to approve final project proposal and authorization for the Director of Cultural 
Affairs to enter into an agreement with the artist for an amount not to exceed $27,000 for an 
installation targeted for August, 2008. 

6. Randall Museum 

Regina Almaguer 

Update on the Randall Museum panel. 

Motion: Motion to authorize payment of an additional honorarium in the amount of $250 each to 
the following artists Wang Po Shu, Walter Kitundu, and Charles Sower to submit a revised 
proposal for the Randall Museum public art project. 

7. Community Arts and Education Program poster 

Dia Penning 

Presentation of a project of the Community Arts and Education program of poster designs 

submitted by the San Francisco Unified School District for display in kiosks on Market Street. 

Motion: Motion to approve a project of the Community Arts and Education Program for an 
exhibition in kiosks on Market Street of posters submitted by the San Francisco Unified School 
District to be installed in April, 2008. 

8. Broadway Streetscape 

■ Tonia Macneil 
Presentation of a 3 foot-by-3 foot photographic image of the proposed text layout for the sidewalk 
portion of Brian Goggin's work. Report on plans for related event at the San Francisco Museum of 

Modern Art. 

9. General Hospital 

Susan Pontious 

Introduction of the project at General Hospital and an overview of art opportunities. 

10. Art on Market Street Program 

Judy Moran 

Discussion of several artists under consideration to develop proposals for the Art on Market Street 

2008-09 Programs. 

11. Collections Report: Project Updates 

Allison Cummings/Carol Marie Daniels 

Report on the Francis Scott Key and Portals of the Past monuments. Report on the Crumpler Mura 

Conservation, Cider Press Monument and the Chamberlain/Hamilton Card Wall at the Main 

Library. 

12. New Business 

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13. Old Business 

14. Adjournment 

MC 3/13/2008 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts Commission office, 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during regular business hours. INFO: Mary 
Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic devices are 
prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the removal from the meeting of 
any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell phone, pager, or other similar sound- 
producing electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or administrative action 
may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San Francisco Campaign and Governmental 
Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register and report lobbying activity. For more information 
about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 
Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 
http://www.sfgov.org/ethics. 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. Commissions, 
boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct the people's business. This 
ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the people and that City operations are open 
to the people's review. For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report 
a violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine 
Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by 
phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at sotf@sfgov.org. 

Citizens interested in obtaining a free copy of the Sunshine Ordinance can request a copy from Mr. 
Darby or by printing Chapter 67 of the San Francisco Administrative Code on the Internet, 
http://www.sfgov.org/sunshine/. 



http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=77253 3/1 3/2008 



Date: March 13, 2008 

To: The Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 
Cc: President PJ Johnston 

Luis Cancel, Director of Cultural Affairs 

From: Jill Manton, Director, Public Art Program 

Re: Harvey Milk Bust Location 

Commissioners: 

As you know, there has been much time and effort devoted to the challenge of finding an 
appropriate location for the Harvey Milk bust in City Hall. Issues of aesthetics and access 
have had to be balanced with political concerns and sensitivity. In addition, there have 
been multiple perspectives and opinions voiced by the many people involved in the 
process. 

Following the March 3rd Arts Commission meeting, Commissioners Johnston and 
Przyblyski joined me and Senior Registrar Allison Cummings to inspect and evaluate 
possible solutions for the Milk/Rossi bust placement situation. We identified three 
options which were prioritized by Commissioners Johnston and Przyblyski. At their 
direction, this list of options and a concise description of the pros and cons of each was 
sent to Mike Farrah of the Mayor's office for his response. The options included: 

Option 1: Place the Harvey Milk bust in the Board of Supervisor's Ceremonial 
Rotunda. This was the original site requested by the Harvey Milk City Hall Memorial 
Committee. City Hall staff involved with the scheduling of weddings, tours and facility 
management had raised concerns about the possible conflict with the weddings that are 
scheduled daily for that same space. If this option is accepted, the Rossi bust stays where 
it is in the Van Ness lobby. The artists did not like the lighting in the site, nor the fact that 
the wall sconce would be several inches above the top of the bust. 

Option 2: Move Mayor Rossi temporarily to the Mayor's Rotunda on the 2nd floor 
and place Harvey Milk in the site formerly occupied by Mayor Rossi. This site for the 
Rossi had been previously recommended by the Mayor's office, but was not necessarily 
acceptable to Mayor Rossi's grand daughter Rose Marie Cleese. 

Option 3: Move the O'Shaunnessey bust to the wall at the top of the stairway leading 
from the Ground level Grove Street entrance with the likelihood that the bust will be 
relocated to the new PUC headquarters at 525 Golden Gate. Move the Milk to the site 
occupied by the O'Shaunnessey. Although staff and Commissioners agreed that this 
bust is significantly under-scaled for the site it occupies, it had been placed in the recent 
past and involved a Sister City relationship. 



The Mayor's office has recommended that the Harvey Milk bust be placed in the Board 
of Supervisor's Ceremonial Rotunda. This decision is reflected in the new motion to be 
voted upon at the March 19th Visual Arts Committee meeting. All involved parties have 
been contacted about this decision. The Harvey Milk City Hall Memorial Committee also 
supports this location. The artists remain concerned about lighting and the proximity of 
the wall sconce, however, the City Hall Facility Manager has agreed to investigate the 
possibility of additional lighting. Commissioner Johnston has offered to join me at the 
City Hall Preservation Advisory Commission meeting when this information is conveyed 
to the Commissioners. 



Public Art and Collections staff have started to work on a preliminary set of guidelines 
for the placement of future busts or commemorative works of art in City Hall. It is still a 
work in progress and not yet ready for distribution. 



sfac: March 19, 2008 meeting cancelled 



Page 1 of 1 



San Francisco Arts Commission 

March 19, 2008 Meeting Cancelled 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, March 19, 2008 

3:00 p.m. 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 



Meeting Cancelled 






DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

MAR 2 h 2008 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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3/21/2008 



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San Francisco Arts Commission 

March 31, 2008 Special Meeting DOCUMENTS DEPT 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 



Monday, March 31, 2008 

3:00 p.m. 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 



MAR 2 k 2008 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Agenda 
1. Consent 



1. Motion to approve an amendment to increase the budget for Scott Donahue's contract 
#POAR04000098 for the design, fabrication and installation of artworks for the Richmond Branch 
Library by an amount not to exceed $1,000, for a new contract total amount not to exceed 
$36,000, for additionally required engineering services regarding the safety of the artwork. 

2. Motion to acknowledge, accept with gratitude, and expend a gift of $2,000 from Friends of 
Duboce Park and $1,500 from Hal Fischer and an anonymous donor for the fabrication and 
installation of an artwork designed by Susan Schwartzenberg and Michael Davis of a quotation 
from Harvey Milk on the east-facing wall of the Harvey Milk Center for Recreational Arts. 

2. Laguna Honda Hospital 

Susan Pontious 

Report on the work of artist Cliff Garten at Laguna Honda Hospital. 

Motion: Motion to approve revised design in bronze for Cliff Garten's sculptural handrails. 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into an agreement with Cliff 
Garten for $238,108 to fabricate, transport and install 604 linear feet of bronze sculptural 
handrails. 

3. Harvey Milk Memorial Bust 

Jill Manton 
Staff Report 

Discussion and staff report on the proposed location of the Harvey Milk Memorial Bust in City Hall. 

Motion: Motion to rescind resolution 1001-07-278 approving location proposal for the Harvey Milk 
Memorial sculpture on a south-facing wall in the Van Ness lobby of City Hall pending approval of 
the site by the Harvey Milk City Hall Memorial Committee and the City Hall Preservation Advisory 
Committee. 

Motion: Motion to approve the placement of the Harvey Milk memorial bust in the Board of 
Supervisors Ceremonial Rotunda in City Hall. 

4. Academy of Sciences 

Jill Manton 

Report on the progress of artist Maya Lin's public art project. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final design proposal and budget submitted by Maya Lin for the 
suspended wire landscape sculpture to be fabricated from marine grade stainless steel tubing 



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approximately 5/8 inches in diameter to be installed in the exterior West Terrace of the Academy 
of Sciences for an amount not to exceed $275,000 including fabrication, transportation and 
installation. 

5. Lake Merced Temporary Art in Natural Settings 

Regina Almaguer 

Presentation by artist John Melvin on the Lake Merced Temporary Art in Natural Settings project. 

Motion: Motion to approve final project proposal and authorization for the Director of Cultural 
Affairs to enter into an agreement with the artist for an amount not to exceed $27,000 for an 
installation targeted for August, 2008. 

6. Randall Museum 

Regina Almaguer 

Update on the Randall Museum panel. 

Motion; Motion to authorize payment of an additional honorarium in the amount of $250 each to 
the following artists Wang Po Shu, Waiter Kitundu, and Charles Sower to submit a revised 
proposal for the Randall Museum public art project. 

7. Community Arts and Education Program poster 

Dia Penning 

Presentation of a project of the Community Arts and Education program of poster designs 

submitted by the San Francisco Unified School District for display in kiosks on Market Street. 

Motion: Motion to approve a project of the Community Arts and Education Program for an 
exhibition in kiosks on Market Street of posters submitted by the San Francisco Unified School 
District to be installed in April, 2008. 

8. Broadway Streetscape 

Tonia Macneii 

Presentation of a 3 foot-by-3 foot photographic image of the proposed text layout for the sidewalk 
portion of Brian Goggin's work. Report on plans for related event at the San Francisco Museum of 
Modern Art. 

9. General Hospital 

Susan Pontious 

Introduction of the project at General Hospital and an overview of art opportunities. 

10. Art on Market Street Program 

Judy Mo ran 

Discussion of several artists under consideration to develop proposals for the Art on Market Street 

2008-09 Programs. 

11. Collections Report: Project Updates 

Allison Cummings/Carol Marie Daniels 

Report on the Francis Scott Key and Portals of the Past monuments. Report on the Crumpler Mura 

Conservation, Cider Press Monument and the Chamberlain/Hamilton Card Wall at the Main 

Library. 

12. New Business 



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13. Old Business 

14. Adjournment 

MC 3/21/2008 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts Commission office, 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during regular business hours. INFO: Mary 
Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic devices are 
prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the removal from the meeting of 
any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell phone, pager, or other similar sound- 
producing electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or administrative action 
may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San Francisco Campaign and Governmental 
Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register and report lobbying activity. For more information 
about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 
Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 
http://www.sfgov.org/ethics. 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. Commissions, 
boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct the people's business. This 
ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the people and that City operations are open 
to the people's review. For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report 
a violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine 
Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by 
phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at sotf@sfgov.org. 



http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=77704 



3/21/2008 



Date: March 13, 2008 

To: The Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 
Cc: President PJ Johnston 

Luis Cancel, Director of Cultural Affairs 

From: Jill Manton, Director, Public Art Program 

Re: Harvey Milk Bust Location 

Commissioners: 

As you know, there has been much time and effort devoted to the challenge of finding an 
appropriate location for the Harvey Milk bust in City Hall. Issues of aesthetics and access 
have had to be balanced with political concerns and sensitivity. In addition, there have 
been multiple perspectives and opinions voiced by the many people involved in the 
process. 

Following the March 3rd Arts Commission meeting, Commissioners Johnston and 
Przyblyski joined me and Senior Registrar Allison Cummings to inspect and evaluate 
possible solutions for the Milk/Rossi bust placement situation. We identified three 
options which were prioritized by Commissioners Johnston and Przyblyski. At their 
direction, this list of options and a concise description of the pros and cons of each was 
sent to Mike Farrah of the Mayor's office for his response. The options included: 

Option 1: Place the Harvey Milk bust in the Board of Supervisor's Ceremonial 
Rotunda. This was the original site requested by the Harvey Milk City Hall Memorial 
Committee. City Hall staff involved with the scheduling of weddings, tours and facility 
management had raised concerns about the possible conflict with the weddings that are 
scheduled daily for that same space. If this option is accepted, the Rossi bust stays where 
it is in the Van Ness lobby. The artists did not like the lighting in the site, nor the fact that 
the wall sconce would be several inches above the top of the bust. 

Option 2: Move Mayor Rossi temporarily to the Mayor's Rotunda on the 2nd floor 
and place Harvey Milk in the site formerly occupied by Mayor Rossi. This site for the 
Rossi had been previously recommended by the Mayor's office, but was not necessarily 
acceptable to Mayor Rossi's grand daughter Rose Marie Cleese. 

Option 3: Move the O'Shaunnessey bust to the wall at the top of the stairway leading 
from the Ground level Grove Street entrance with the likelihood that the bust will be 
relocated to the new PUC headquarters at 525 Golden Gate. Move the Milk to the site 
occupied by the O'Shaunnessey. Although staff and Commissioners agreed that this 
bust is significantly under-scaled for the site it occupies, it had been placed in the recent 
past and involved a Sister City relationship. 



The Mayor's office has recommended that the Harvey Milk bust be placed in the Board 
of Supervisor's Ceremonial Rotunda. This decision is reflected in the new motion to be 
voted upon at the March 1 9th Visual Arts Committee meeting. All involved parties have 
been contacted about this decision. The Harvey Milk City Hall Memorial Committee also 
supports this location. The artists remain concerned about lighting and the proximity of 
the wall sconce, however, the City Hall Facility Manager has agreed to investigate the 
possibility of additional lighting. Commissioner Johnston has offered to join me at the 
City Hall Preservation Advisory Commission meeting when this information is conveyed 
to the Commissioners. 



Public Art and Collections staff have started to work on a preliminary set of guidelines 
for the placement of future busts or commemorative works of art in City Hall. It is still a 
work in progress and not yet ready for distribution. 



sfac: March 31, 2008 special meeting Page 1 of 10 



San Francisco Arts Commission 

TEXT ONLY: 

□ 

PRINT: 

1 

TEXT SIZE: 



March 31, 2008 Special Meeting 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

j. 1S - Monday, March 31, 2008 



[/*'/•* 



3:00 p.m. 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 

DOCUMENTS DEFT 

Minutes 

Commissioners Present: ^pp 2 9 2008 

Jeannene Przyblyski, Leonard Hunter, Pop Zhao 

Absent: Lawrence Rinder, Dede Wilsey SAN FRANCISCO 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Staff Present: 

Mary Chou, Luis Cancel, Allison Cummings, Carol Marie Daniels, Marcus Davies, Jill Manton, Judy Moran, 
Judy Nemzoff, Dia Penning, Susan Pontious, Ellen Shershow 

Note: All votes are unanimous unless recorded otherwise. 

The meeting commenced at 3:01 p.m. 

1. Consent 

1. Motion to approve an amendment to increase the budget for Scott Donahue's contract 
#POAR04000098 for the design, fabrication and installation of artworks for the Richmond Branch 
Library by an amount not to exceed $1,000, for a new contract total amount not to exceed 
$36,000, for additionally required engineering services regarding the safety of the artwork. 

2. Motion to acknowledge, accept with gratitude, and expend a gift of $2,000 from Friends of 
Duboce Park and $1,500 from Hal Fischer and an anonymous donor for the fabrication and 
installation of an artwork designed by Susan Schwartzenberg and Michael Davis of a quotation 
from Harvey Milk on the east-facing wall of the Harvey Milk Center for Recreational Arts. 

Motion: Motion to adopt the consent calendar items. 
Moved: Hunter/Zhao 

2. Laguna Honda Hospital 

Artist Cliff Garten presented images of the handrail design in bronze for Laguna Honda Hospital. 
The artists initially proposed using polyurethane, but the high production cost associated with this 
material led to a consideration of other media. Mr. Garten reported that the various sections of 
the handrail have been designed to fit the dimensions of the hallway. Stainless steel brackets will 
attach the bronze handrails to the wall and the handrail will have a patina that ranges from 
reddish brown to copper. 



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In response to Commissioner Leonard Hunter's question about the quantity of unique pieces, Mr. 
Garten estimated that about 95 percent of the handrails will consist of the repeating 4-foot 
sections, with slightly different designs, and the remaining five percent will consist of shorter 
connector pieces. Mr. Garten explained that this project was somewhat like an industrial design 
project because of the variety of codes and the complexity of the installation. 

In response to Commissioner Hunter's question about what was covered in the budget, Mr. Garten 
confirmed that the amount of $238,108 included the installation as well as the production of the 
handrail. Mr. Garten also clarified that the model of the 409 linear feet of handrail section he 
brought to the meeting is different from the final iteration shown in the images of his 
presentation. The final design maintains the circular shape at the top of the rail while providing for 
more of a grip. Commissioner Jeannene Przyblyski recalled that in an earlier presentation of the 
handrail, the Committee recommended that Mr. Garten improve the functionality of the handrail 
by providing for more of a grip. 

Motion: Motion to approve revised design in bronze for Cliff Garten's sculptural handrails in 
Laguna Honda Hospital. 
Moved: Hunter/Zhao 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into an agreement with Cliff 
Garten for $238,108 to fabricate, transport and install 604 linear feet of bronze sculptural 
handrails in Laguna Honda Hospital. 
Moved: Hunter/Zhao 

3. Harvey Milk Memorial Bust 

Public Art Program Director Jill Manton reviewed the options for the placement of the Harvey Milk 
Memorial bust in City Hall and reported that the Mayor's Office has recommended'that the bust be 
placed in the Board of Supervisors' Ceremonial Rotunda. This placement corresponds with the 
original request of the Harvey Milk City Hall Memorial Committee. Ms. Manton reported that the 
Arts Commission staff supports this placement and confirmed that the bust of Mayor Rossi will, for 
the present time, remain in its current location in the Van Ness lobby. 

Commissioner Przyblyski requested public comment. Joey Cain, on behalf of the Harvey Milk City 
Hall Committee, responded that he agrees with the placement of the Harvey Milk Memorial Bust in 
the Ceremonial Rotunda. 

Commissioner Hunter commented that a set of guidelines for the placement of busts in City Hall 
seemed quite necessary. Ms. Manton responded that the Public Art and Collections staff have 
started to draft a preliminary set of guidelines. 

There was some discussion regarding the imagery on the memorial plaques to be installed on the 
sides of the pedestal. Regarding the depiction of the marchers on Gay Freedom Day of 1978, 
artists have been directed to depict the marchers in the dress of the 1970s. Commissioner Pop 
Zhao also suggested that attention be paid to the accurate rendering of balloons on the plaque. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that it has been a pleasure working with the Harvey Milk City Hall 
Memorial Committee and noted not only the importance of remembering that busts are a part of 
living history, but also the diplomacy that needs to be exercised in regards to bust placement in 
City Hall. 

Motion: Motion to rescind resolution 1001-07-278 approving location proposal for the Harvey Milk 
Memorial sculpture on a south-facing wall in the Van Ness lobby of City Hall pending approval of 



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the site by the Harvey Milk City Hall Memorial Committee and the City Hall Preservation Advisory 

Committee. 

Moved: Hunter/Zhao 

Motion: Motion to approve the placement of the Harvey Milk memorial bust in the Board of 
Supervisors Ceremonial Rotunda in City Hall. 
Moved: Hunter/Zhao 

4. Academy of Sciences 

Ms. Manton provided an update on artist Maya Lin's two public art projects at the Academy of 
Sciences. Ms. Manton reported that at a recent site visit, Ms. Lin presented a model of the wire 
landscape, which was very effective in conveying her concept and how it would be viewed at its 
site on the West Terrace. Ms. Manton stated that the artist is speaking with the Renzo Piano 
Building Workshop regarding design options for the attachment of the sculpture to the terrace 
columns. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that the work was more beautiful in a formal aesthetic manner 
than she had first imagined based on earlier models of the work. Ms. Lin will be working in 
marine-grade stainless steel and is evaluating possible coatings from an aesthetic as well as a 
maintenance and conservation perspective. Ms. Manton reported that the Arts Commission has 
engaged a conservator to evaluate the longevity of the materials proposed in the Golden Gate 
Park environment. She also stated that the Arts Commission will be responsible for the production 
and installation of interpretive signage. The Academy believes that interpretive signage is an 
important component of the work. The Arts Commission will look into an appropriate location for 
the plaque. 

Ms. Manton provided an update on the video table sculpture, and stated that, of the three 
different technologies under consideration, it was clear from the site visit and video system mock- 
ups that two of the three would not be appropriate. The third option under investigation is a 
projection system within a table with architectural glass on top and metal cladding on the sides. 
Commissioner Przyblyski commented that the projection system is less expensive than the LED 
system but may still be quite costly for a delivery system that will be outdated in ten years. Ms. 
Manton reported that there are still issues to be resolved regarding the ownership and use of the 
video and the proper credit for the work if shown in another venue. Commissioner Przyblyski 
commented that this project has been challenging for a variety of reasons. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final design proposal and budget submitted by Maya Lin for the 

suspended wire landscape sculpture to be fabricated from marine grade stainless steel tubing 

approximately 5/8 inches in diameter to be installed in the exterior West Terrace of the Academy 

of Sciences for an amount not to exceed $275,000 including fabrication, transportation and 

installation. 

Moved: Hunter/Zhao 

5. Lake Merced Temporary Art in Natural Settings 

Artist John Melvin presented his Temporary Art in Natural Settings project proposed for Lake 
Merced. Mr. Melvin described the process of choosing a site in collaboration with the Audobon 
Society and the decision to focus on the northwest corner of North Lake, which has a smaller bird 
population and the climatological advantage of having a natural wind buffer. Mr. Melvin informed 
the Committee that he has worked closely with the Recreation and Park Natural Areas Program 
and has attended many meetings of the Lake Merced Task Force. He was pleased to report that 
he has the support of both of these groups. 



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He also explained his collaboration with the Engineering Department at San Francisco State 
University to determine how to suspend the balloons. The project consists of over 3,000 white 
balloons made of natural latex, 36 inches in diameter, and translucent when filled, suspended 
above the lake with anywhere from 6 to 100 lines of A 1 /2-inch white nylon that will be attached to 
trees and visible to birds. The work speaks to issues of molecular density, multiplicity, 
mathematical theories and flexible architectures. The installation will commence on August 11, 
2008, and will take three days to build. Mr. Melvin stated that the California Dragon Boat 
Association may rent boats at the north end of the lake and he will try to arrange for viewers to 
take a boat to view the work from below. He also stated that he is investigating the possibility of 
using artificial light to illuminate the project. Mr. Melvin explained to the Committee that 
uniformed volunteers will be monitoring the work on a 24-hour basis to retrieve any broken 
balloons. He also mentioned his interest in the possibility of a symposium. Commissioner 
Przyblyski commented that it would be great to have something near the location of the work. 

Mr. Melvin explained that rather than having pamphlets printed, which did not seem ecologically 
responsible, he would ask volunteers to engage visitors with five ideas that would function as 
talking points. Ms. Manton responded that the Arts Commission will create temporary signage. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that Lake Merced is a very beloved place and visitors will want to 
learn about the project and be assured it is not going to negatively impact the natural setting. She 
stated that a good title for the project, as well as the use of uniformed volunteers, would go a 
long way to make people feel more comfortable. Ms. Manton also stressed the importance of a 
publicity and promotional plan because the project is ephemeral. 

Motion: Motion to approve final project proposal and authorization for the Director of Cultural 
Affairs to enter into an agreement with the artist John Melvin for an amount not to exceed 
$27,000 for a temporary art project at Lake Merced targeted for August, 2008. 
Moved: Zhao, Hunter 

Randall Museum 

Project Manager Regina Almaguer presented an update on the Randall Museum selection panel 
meeting. Of the four artist proposals submitted, one was rejected outright by the selection panel 
and the other three artists/artist teams were asked to make revisions. Two of the three asked to 
make revisions will meet with the Museum Director to discuss modifications. Artist Walter Kitundu 
stated that he did not want to make any changes to his proposal. Ms. Almaguer reported that the 
Museum Director felt that the particular Brazilian hardwood, ipe, proposed by Mr. Kitundu for his 
work would deteriorate if placed outside. Ms. Manton suggested the Arts Commission staff speak 
with a conservator about the wood. Commissioner Hunter stated that ipe has a 40-year 
deterioration and that data about this wood should be readily accessible. 

Commissioner Przyblyski believed the selection panel was not fond of Mr. Kitundu's proposal nor 
the Wowhaus proposal with its course of amusements. She stated that the Museum could not 
proactively define what they want in an artwork, but only what they don't want. Commissioner 
Przyblyski stated that the Randall Museum wants something that engages visitors of all ages, that 
creates a strong enough visual statement to brand the Museum without overwhelming it, and that 
relates to the mission of the Museum. The Museum liked the iconic aspect of the work proposed 
byWang Po Shu and Louise Bertlesen, but thought it might be too large in size and that visitors 
might not understand the sound component of the work. 

Ms. Almaguer stated that artists will receive an extra stipend to revise their proposals and that 
there is a desire to address the concerns of the Museum and not go into a second round of 
selections. The proposal boards are currently installed in the Museum and the second selection 



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panel will meet mid- to late April. 

Motion: Motion to authorize payment of an additional honorarium in the amount of $250 each to 
artists Wang Po Shu, Walter Kitundu, and Charles Sower to submit a revised proposal for the 
Randall Museum public art project. 
Moved: Zhao, Hunter 

7. Community Arts and Education Program poster 

Community Arts and Education Program Director Judy Nemzoff presented two poster designs 
submitted by the San Francisco Unified School District for display in kiosks on Market Street. The 
posters feature imaginative shoes designed by youth. The smaller poster will be installed in kiosks 
during the Young at Art festival at the de Young Museum over a ten-day period in May, 2008. The 
larger posters will be installed throughout downtown in the Decaux kiosks to promote the Young 
at Art Festival. Ms. Nemzoff stated that the design for next year's posters will be more in the spirit 
of the Art on Market Street program, with original art created by youth. 

Commissioner Przyblyski praised the posters for giving visibility to the program. She expressed 
concern that the font used for "San Francisco is the campus" is not as fun and vibrant as the font 
used for "Young at Art" on the other poster. Ms. Nemzoff acknowledged her point and explained 
that the intent was for the Market Street posters to read more as a recognition of youth art and 
not an advertisement for the Young at Art Festival. 

Motion: Motion to approve a project of the Community Arts and Education Program for an 
exhibition in kiosks on Market Street of posters submitted by the San Francisco Unified School 
District to be installed in April, 2008. 
Moved: Hunter, Zhao 

8. Broadway Streetscape 

Artist Brian Goggin presented an image of a prototype three-foot-by-three-foot paver with 
imbedded text for the sidewalk portion of his work. He explained that the intent of the scattering 
of words within the concrete paver is not the legibility of the words but the pattern it creates on 
the floor and the interactive experience it creates with the book forms above. 

Commissioner Hunter stated that the proposed pattern with text looks beautiful. In response to 
questions about the actual size of the text, Mr. Goggin explained that the letters will vary in size 
from one to two inches, but he may use a larger font for Chinese characters. 

Commissioner Zhao stated that since there is only one Chinese character, dragon, in the design of 
the sample paver presented, people might misinterpret the meaning of the work. Commissioner 
Zhao cautioned about the use of particular Chinese characters. In response to Commissioner 
Przyblyski's inquiry about other languages that would be included in the scattering, Mr. Goggin 
responded that the text would include English, Chinese, and Italian. 

Mr. Goggin stated that the process of scattering the text is intended to be a random act. 
Commissioner Przyblyski responded that the idea of creating this chance experiment is rich in 
meaning, but there will have to be an editing process to insure the text will be received in the way 
intended by the artist before it is memorialized in cement. Commissioner Przyblyski explained that 
with the scattering of words in English, it would be obvious to the artist if there was something 
that could be misinterpreted or inappropriate, but that he might not be aware of how non-English 
text might be construed. 

Mr. Goggin reported that the scattering of the words, which is not a performance but part of the 



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process of creating the work, will occur at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art on April 9, 
from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Ms. Manton stated that she would forward the email with an 
invitation and details to the Commissioners. Mr. Goggin explained that the words will be cast out 
from the second story of the main stairway onto paper on the floor of the museum lobby. The 
words that drift down onto the template will be adhered to the template, taken back to the studio, 
then photographed and scanned. 

Director of Cultural Affairs Luis Cancel suggested that Mr. Goggin review the scattered text at the 
stage of photography and do enough scatterings to fill more than 59 pavers in case alternate 
patterns are needed. Ms. Manton summarized that Mr. Goggin will submit the Chinese characters 
to be scattered to Arts Commission staff to be reviewed by Commissioner Zhao; Arts Commission 
staff will review photographs of the paver design and determine if anything needs the further 
attention of the Commissioners; and Mr. Goggin will exercise intervention and editing to prevent 
the misinterpretation of the Chinese characters. 

Mr. Goggin asked whether Chinese characters may overlap other words and whether he may 
scatter one character or a combination of characters. Commissioner Zhao stated that either of 
these scenarios would be fine. Mr. Goggin also confirmed that words which cross the division 
between pavers will not be interrupted, with the exception of the expansion joint between the 
pavers. 

General Hospital 

Public Art Program Deputy Director Susan Pontious reviewed the floor plans of General Hospital 
with the Commissioners, pointing out possible locations for the installation of artwork including 
the waiting rooms in the basement, the lobby with a two-story wall behind the reception desk, 
intake rooms, reception rooms, and nurses' stations. 

In response to Commissioners' inquiries, Ms. Pontious stated that an entrance to the hospital on 
Potrero Avenue is still under design consideration. There is a walkway from Potrero Avenue to the 
other side of the hospital where the main entrance is located. Commissioner Hunter suggested it 
might be interesting to get an artist involved with designing the walkway. In response to 
Commissioner Hunter's inquiry about projects for the rooftop healing garden, Ms. Pontious stated 
that a landscape architect has been hired to design the garden, but that she didn't know the 
status of the design. 

Ms. Pontious reviewed the staff report on General Hospital with the Commissioners and stated 
that there would be about $5.5 million for art enrichment, from which $4.18 million would be for 
the design, fabrication, and installation of multiple artworks, $220,000 would be set aside for 
maintenance, if allowed by the funding source, and the balance was for administrative and other 
costs. In comparison, art enrichment for Laguna Honda Hospital was a total of $3.9 million. Ms. 
Pontious stated that General Hospital is expected to open in 2013 and the bond measure will go tc 
the voters in November, 2008. She noted the strict requirements of the Office of Statewide Health 
Planning and Development ("OSHPD") whereby structural reinforcement is needed for any two- 
dimensional artworks over 20 pounds. She then reviewed the preliminary project goals, as listed 
in the staff report, and presented the concept of evidence-based design, in which images of 
nature with depth of field have been found to lower the stress of patients more than abstract 
works or no works at all. As described in the staff report, there have been several studies using 
evidence-based design to measure the impact of art on the clinical and behavioral outcomes of 
patients in hospital settings. The most significant of these studies was conducted in Sweden by 
Roger Ulrich, who found that heart surgery patients in an ICU who were shown scenes of nature 
with water, trees, and high depth of field showed less anxiety, suffered less intense pain, and 
required lower strength medication than those who were shown abstract scenes or no image at 



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all. 

Commissioner Hunter questioned the idea of applying evidence-based design principles to the 
development of an art program. He stated that Ann Chamberlain's piece at the University of 
California San Francisco Mount Zion Cancer Center is beautiful and meaningful but requires some 
thought. 

Ms. Pontious explained that it is important to take the findings from the study on evidence-based 
design into consideration. She stated that there are many innovative programs that utilize 
evidence-based design principles, including the one at Harborview Medical Center in King County. 
She reported that in her discussions with General Hospital staff, they said they enjoyed the art 
program developed for the Mental Health Rehabilitation Center, which consisted primarily of two- 
dimensional works. Ms. Pontious explained that the hospital had specific guidelines for the Center 
and it took her several years to select artworks that humanized the environment and reflected the 
demographics of the hospital population, but fit within their guidelines. Ms. Pontious stated that if 
it is true that certain works relieve people's stress and pain, then we should consider this when we 
select or commission new work. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that she has had several discussions about humanizing the design 
of General Hospital and believes the resulting design will resemble that of an airport terminal. She 
then explained there are a broad range of solutions in creating an art program that includes the 
exterior as well as the interior of the building. Since the building will be value-engineered, she 
said, the art program should be quality-engineered. 

Commissioner Hunter asked how the art program at Laguna Honda fits within the criteria of 
evidence-based design. Ms. Pontious stated that the works at Laguna Honda were selected for the 
particular goal of stimulating the patients' thought processes and activating their senses. For the 
Mental Health Rehabilitation Facility ("MHRF"), with confined patients, the goals were slightly 
different and works were selected to be harmonious with the goals of their therapy. Ms. Pontious's 
sense about General Hospital is that the work should be chosen to relieve stress and anxiety. 
Commissioner Hunter agreed there are imaginative ways to engage images of nature such as with 
Andy Goldsworthy's garden sculptures and Diane Andrews Hall's work at Laguna Honda Hospital. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that the Commissioners should read the staff report distributed b\ 
Ms. Pontious. Commissioner Przyblyski also requested that Ms. Pontious present Commissioners 
with images of works based on evidence-based design principles during the next Visual Arts 
Committee meeting. 

10. Art on Market Street Program 

Project Manager Judy Moran presented images of the works of four artists under consideration to 
develop proposals for the Art on Market Street 2008-2009 Program, which focuses on the theme 
of narrative and stories. She reminded Commissioners that Owen Smith will create poster designs 
for installation from June to September of 2008 and she is looking for artists to create works for 
the other two three-month poster slots subsequent to Mr. Smith's series. Ms. Moran announced 
that the catalogue for Packard Jennings and Steve Lambert's current Art on Market Street project 
is now available and the work was also reviewed in SPUR's monthly publication, The Urbanist, 
with assistance from Commissioner Przyblyski. 

Ms. Moran presented the works of four artists to the Visual Arts Committee. Artist Jenifer Wofford 
works individually as well as collaboratively with a Filipina-American group called Mail Order 
Brides. Ms. Moran showed images of Ms. Wofford's paintings from a series about nurses and 
another about an imaginary hotel. She then introduced images of some artwork by Jaime Cortez, 



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who has worked for various art organizations in San Francisco including Galeria de la Raza, and 
has published a graphic novel called Sex/7e which tells the story of a transgendered woman's 
journey to the United States from Cuba. Ms. Moran then presented the collaborative works of 
Thien Pham and Briana Miller, including a series of announcements for Kearny Street Workshop. 
Ms. Moran presented the final artist, Kota Ezawa, who is well-known for creating computer- 
generated animations based on media images, including the CO Simpson trial, as well as 
photographs of John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Susan Sontag, and Joseph Beuys. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that she would like to see proposals from everyone in this group 
and noted that Ms. Wofford's work would be interesting in this context. She inquired about the 
arrangement of the pieces on Market Street. Ms. Moran stated that the artist would create six or 
eight originals, which would then repeat down Market Street. The goal of the current narrative 
theme would be to encourage pedestrians to walk down Market Street to see how a story 
develops from one poster to the next. Commissioner Przyblyski expressed her appreciation for the 
larger community embraced in this group of artists selected for Market Street. 

11. Collections Report: Project Updates 

Senior Registrar Allison Cummings reported on Phase II of the restoration of the Portals of the 
Past monument in Golden Gate Park along the shores of Lloyd Lake. Phase I consisted of installing 
a new concrete base and steel structure for seismic stabilization. Phase II is focused on the 
aesthetics of the work and will include the installation of a newly fabricated column to replace a 
missing one, the installation of a copper flashing roof system to prevent water intrusion, and a 
general cleaning. The work will be completed by ARG Conservation Services. 

Commissioner Przyblyski asked if there were any plans to do some landscaping around the 
monument as part of Phase II. Ms. Manton stated that the work was funded in part by a grant 
from the State of California and by a Recreation and Park bond and she thought that the 
Recreation and Park Department would be receptive to the proposal to improve the landscaping 
surrounding the work upon completion of the restoration. 

Ms. Cummings reported on the restoration of the Francis Scott Key monument in Golden Gate 
Park. The majority of the restoration work will focus on stabilizing the cornice, which is currently 
stabilized with temporary straps. There will be repairs made to the vertical cracks beneath the 
birds perched at the top of the monument and a general cleaning of the stone and bronze. Ms. 
Cummings stated that since there are signs of shiftinga€"the monument has been moved 
beforea€"there will also be an overall assessment of its structural stability to address concerns 
about how well the monument is expected to withstand earthquake damage. The work will be 
completed by ARG Conservation Services. 

Project Manager Carol Marie Daniels reported on the Chamberlain/Hamilton Card Wall at the Main 
Library. The library's engineering staff made a 33 inch x 25 inch cut through the card wall to gain 
access to leaking pipes behind the wall. After the plumbing repairs were completed the wall 
section was tilted into place and attached to a stud through three layers of drywall using 3 
inch steel screws. Cosmetic repairs were made along the border of the wall section, on areas 
where original screws were removed and atop newly placed screws. Seven new catalogue cards 
were used to replace those affected by the treatment. After the plaster cured, a thick layer of wax 
was applied to visually integrate the new patches with the surrounding areas. ARG Conservation 
Services supervised the de-installation and re-installation of the wall and performed the cosmetic 
repairs. The affected section of the wall is barely noticeable. 

Ms. Daniels then reported on the Cider Press Monument, which was temporarily relocated during 
the construction for the new de Young Museum and Concourse parking structure. While the 



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sculpture was in storage, the bucket went missing. Swinerton Builders, the General Contractors, 
accepted the responsibility to have the bucket refabricated and reinstalled. Artworks Foundry in 
Berkeley has cast a new bucket and will patinate it. The bucket was previously stolen in 1989. To 
mitigate the risk of theft, epoxy and bolts will be used to secure the bucket. Reinstallation by 
Atthowe Fine Art Services is scheduled for May, 2008. Following reinstallation of the bucket, the 
sculpture will be cleaned and recoated. 

Ms. Daniels reported on the restoration of the Dewey Crumpler mural at the Joseph Lee 
Recreation Center. ARG Conservation Services is under contract to conserve and stabilize the 
mural. Ms. Daniels will hold an orientation meeting in May with the conservator, Recreation and 
Park Department staff, officers from the Bayview Police Station, the Bayview Opera House staff, 
and other community members to discuss the parameters and the schedule of this restoration 
project. At the completion of the project, there will be a community celebration at the Joseph Lee 
Recreation Center. Work on the project will run from May through July, 2008. 

The Arts Commission has received the final report and the purchased supplies from Architectural 
Conservation, Inc., the firm that was unable to complete the project due to scheduling conflicts 
during the summer of 2007. 

12. New Business 

Mr. Cancel updated the Committee on an interagency effort to focus on revitalizing the downtown 
and theatre district, north of Market and Sixth Street, which is currently in distress with 15 to 25 
shuttered storefronts. The City is looking to collaborate with property owners to provide affordable 
and free space for various cultural nonprofit organizations in a meaningful and sustainable 
partnership. For example, the Golden Gate Theatre has a large space that includes office space 
and storefronts that are currently underutilized. There will be an emphasis on creating a long- 
term partnership with artists and art organizations. 

In response to Commissioner Hunter's inquiry about the different uses of the space at Golden 
Gate Theatre, Mr. Cancel stated that it would be appropriate as rehearsal space for musicians and 
performers, as well as studio and exhibition spaces for visual artists. 

Commissioner Przyblyski suggested looking at organizations like Root Division in San Francisco, 
which is a co-op with affordable spaces that can be used for exhibitions and community 
programming, as these organizations may be looking to expand. Mr. Cancel responded that he is 
considering existing organizations in this area, which will include Red Link Studios and Luggage 
Store. 

13. Old Business 

Ms. Manton explained that there are ongoing difficulties with the relocation of Brian Goggin's 
Guidepost, originally sitedat Moscone Recreation Center, then proposed for the area north of Sava 
Pool. The current plan is to identify a community that is receptive to the artwork and then to 
identify a Recreation and Park site within that community for the artwork. Commissioner 
Przyblyski suggested that the Arts Commission contact Supervisors about the availability of 
artwork for placement in their neighborhoods and communities. 

Ms. Manton presented a review of Louise Bourgeois's Crouching Spider in the April 2008 issue of 
Sculpture magazine. The article, which features public art in the Bay Area, also includes the work 
of two artists who have pieces in the San Francisco International Airport as well as the City's Keith 
Haring sculpture. 



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Ms. Manton stated that she will report on the installation of the Manolo Valdes sculptures next 
month. 

14. Adjournment 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:05 p.m. 

MC 4/21/2008 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts Commission office, 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during regular business hours. INFO: Mary 
Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic devices are 
prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the removal from the meeting of 
any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell phone, pager, or other similar sound- 
producing electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or administrative action 
may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San Francisco Campaign and Governmental 
Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register and report lobbying activity. For more information 
about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 
Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 
http://www.sfgov.org/ethics. 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. Commissions, 
boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct the people's business. This 
ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the people and that City operations are open 
to the people's review. For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report 
a violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine 
Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by 
phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at sotf@sfgov.org. 

Citizens interested in obtaining a free copy of the Sunshine Ordinance can request a copy from Mr. 
Darby or by printing Chapter 67 of the San Francisco Administrative Code on the Internet, 
http://www.sfgov.org/sunshine/. 



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General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 

Draft 3/31/08 

Project Description: 

The project involves building a new building on the west lawn of the existing SFGH campus. 
The new facility will house 284 patient beds, as well as surgical and other acute care functions. 
The building is nine stories, with two basement stories and seven stories above ground. 

The building design by Fong and Chan Architects features a circular formed building that sets on 
a three story rectangular base (two stories are sub-grade). Patient rooms are located around the 
perimeter of floors 2-7, with nursing and other functions located in the interior of the building. 
Due to the dual impact of the constraints of both the site and the budget, the building is tightly 
packed with its programmatic requirements, and provides limited opportunities in the form of un- 
programmed space. 

Project Budget: 

According to Ron Alameida, project manager, the construction cost of the building is estimated to 
be @275,000,000 in 2007 dollars. He has estimated art enrichment based on 2% to be 
$5,500,000. Using this figure, we would apply our budget percentages as follows 

Design, Fabrication and Installation of Artwork: $4,180,000 

Maintenance: $ 220,000 

Administration: $1,100,000 

However, the art enrichment allocation could change as the construction cost is still being 
estimated. As a point of comparison, the art enrichment budget for Laguna Honda Rehabilitation 
Hospital is $3.9 million. 

Schedule: 

To meet the State mandate, the building must open by 2013, but the city is trying to negotiate a 
two year extension to that date. The bond measure is scheduled to go to the voters November, 
2008, by which time Design Development of the project is scheduled to be complete. This 
aggressive timeline forces the Arts Commission to make some decisions very quickly regarding 
the art program, particularly where we want artists to have any direct involvement with the design 
process, or where the inclusion of artwork will require structural reinforcement. It should be 
noted that even hanging 2-dimensional art like paintings or prints requires forethought as 
OSHPD, the state regulatory agency, requires structural reinforcement for hanging anything 
heavier than 20 lbs. on the wall. 

According to the current building design schedule, the following dates dictate the schedule that 
our planning and commissioning process must parallel: 

Arts Commission Civic Design Approval, Phase 2 (Design Development): 5/29/08 

Arts Commission Civic Design Approval Phase 3 (Construction Documents) 12/1 1/08 

Design Development, Interior Finishes Elements: 5/22/08-7/10/08 

Finalize Design Development: 10/23/08 

Structural Package Development: 1 0/3 1 /07- 1 2/30/09 

Building Package Development: 1 1/20/08-10/22/09) 

Construction bid period: 2/23/1 1-4/6/1 1 

Construction: 4/6/11-7/9/14 

Building opening: 12/31/14 



Project Goals: 

1 Develop an art program for the acquisition of new work that serves patients, 
visitors and staff by enhancing the therapeutic environment and results in an art 
collection that meets the highest aesthetic standards. 

2 Become a model by using research, experience, and examples from the field to 
inform innovative and creative responses for developing an art program in a 
hospital setting. 

3 Evaluate condition and appropriateness existing GH collection, and repair, re- 
frame works for reinstallation. Refresh the collection throughout the campus 
with new works as budget allows. 

Approach: 

Consideration of Evidence Based Criteria: 

The current practice in commissioning and purchasing art for hospitals is strongly influenced by 
what is referred to in the hospital field as evidence-based design, which is defined as the 
purposeful and methodical attempt to make decisions using the best available research. 

There have been several studies using evidence-based design to measure the impact of art on the 
clinical and behavioral outcomes of patients in hospital settings. The most significant of these 
studies was conducted in Sweden by Roger Ulrich, who is currently a fellow at the Center for 
Health Systems and Design at Texas A&M University. In this study, he found that heart surgery 
patients in an ICU who were shown scenes of nature with water, trees, and high depth of field 
showed less anxiety, suffered less intense pain, and required lower strength medication than those 
who were shown abstract scenes or no image at all. The findings and subsequent 
recommendations Roger Ulrich constitute the basis of what is called "evidence based artwork,," a 
concept that has been largely adopted throughout the healthcare industry. 

The consulting firm American Art Resources implemented an evidence-based art program in 
2002 at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and conducted an evaluation of the 
program in 2007. The evaluation found that the artwork not only created a less stressful 
environment for the patients and staff but also helped create a more favorable and nurturing 
image of the hospital for visitors. Evidence-based design factors in the happiness and well-being 
of the staff and visitors as well as the patients. There have been other subsequent surveys done of 
patient and visitor preferences and experience of hospital art conducted by AAR and the firm's 
practice, along wit the writings and national speaking engagements of its principals seem to have 
largely defined the practice of evidence based art. 

While empirical studies are limited (and I have been unable to find any peer evaluation of the 
validity of their methodology), they are nonetheless convincing enough to be seen as an indicator 
of best practice in the field. In the June/July 2006 issue of Healthcare Building Ideas, a trade 
journal that serves the design, construction and maintenance professionals. Jack Reichenthal, 
President of Hospital CEO Forum, writes: ". ..research reveals that the investment made in art to 
create a therapeutic environment yields substantial benefits. The research definitively proves 
that patients in recovery from surgery, viewing specific kinds of images, experience reduced 
stress, lower blood pressure, less discomfort, fewer complications, required less pain medication 
and experience speedier recoveries. . .Research reveals that art doesn 7 just hang on the walls. 
But who would have thought that it could have such an impact?" 






What is Evidence Based Art? 

Based on the results of their research, Ulrich and Gilpin summarize their recommendations in 

their book. Putting Patients First. Their top suggestions include the following: 

• Representational landscapes depicted in warmer seasons, with visual depth and open 
foreground. Views with low hills and distant mountains are also recommended. 

• Waterscapes (calm, non-turbulent) 

• Calm weather 

• Flowers (familiar, healthy, fresh and in natural settings with open foreground) 

• Visual Depth with openness in the immediate foreground 

• Figurative art (depicting emotionally positive faces, diverse and leisurely in nature.) 

Research cited in the book, Healing Gardens (Barnes/Marcus), makes the argument for the 
positive therapeutic effect of viewing nature. According to this research, artworks that refer to 
the natural world can be as effective as real landscape in helping hospitalized patients. 

It is noted that there is little known (by way of empirical research) on art for special populations, 
or different ethnicities.) 

Other ideas: 

In a white paper produced for Harborview Medical Center by the King County Public Art 
Program, additional ideas were recommended for consideration in designing a hospital 
environment. These included: 

• Use of light as inspiration 

• Wayfinding, both as landmark and creation of more intimate and private experiences. 

• Use of "life stories;" noting that the construction of narratives is what allows us to find 
our way through life and to give its most difficult moments a sense of meaning. In this 
category the King County Public Art Program also sites Harborview's collection of art 
that focuses on ethnic heritage, acknowledging that in times of trouble a sense of one's 
culture is often an anchor that provides a powerful spiritual balm. 

• The beauty of Science; these are artworks that celebrate the scientific passion for 
humanitarian discovery. An example is Cliff Garten's light fixtures that use the beauty of 
molecular biology as a source of imagery. 

General Hospital Staff Recommendations : 

According to the hospital's project manager, Kathy Jung, the hospital staff sees the art program 
developed for the hospital's Mental Health Rehabilitation Facility (MHRF) as a possible model 
for the new program for GH. This program, developed by SFAC in 1990, features the following: 

• Collection of two-dimensional artwork depicting reality based images of landscapes, still 
lifes, and positive images of different ethnic groups, interpersonal interaction, and 
positive activities. This collection, in both the artists and images selected directly reflects 
the population of the MHRF clients. 

• Landscape and waterscape murals on the support columns of the dayrooms that bring 
nature indoors and de-materialize the heavy columns (David Gordon and Hilda Shum) 

• An artist-designed gazebo with seating in the horticulture therapy area (George Gonzales. 

• Large lobby mural depicting games of the world (Hilda Shum). 

• Outdoor sculpture depicting a diving fish by Hilda Shum; (this artwork is somewhat 
controversial because some Asian patients find the imagery as one of bad luck) 

• Tile mural designed an executed by Johanna Poethig in conjunction with MHRF patients. 



Hospital staff also expressed a desire for more architecturally integrated artworks. 

Summary of Approach: 

The experience of an acute care hospital is one that finds both patients and their families at their 
most vulnerable. And while the research is limited, it nevertheless seems clear that an art 
program that follows certain principles can be enormously effective in supporting patients, 
families and hospital staff. Knowing that art can have such direct impact on the health and well 
being of the hospital users has shaped what I believe is the Commission's mission for the art 
program at the hospital. I would emphasize that there is no formula to be followed here, and the 
adoption of some very literal art prescription would result in a collection that was dead on arrival. 
Rather we must use the research, examples and experience from the field to focus and prioritize 
efforts, and to inform and inspire our choices. 

Summary of Art Opportunities in New Building: 

While all of the areas listed below offer opportunity, the priority for locating artwork should be in 
those areas where it has the most beneficial impact on the hospital users: patients, visitors and 
staff. While this is certainly an issue that needs further discussion and input by all the parties, as 
a point of departure, I have indicated what I believe are priority areas with an asterisk. 

Interior: 

• Main entry, both emergency and main hospital lobby. Sites of special opportunity 
include the 2 story atrium and wall behind the reception desk.* 

• All admitting and registration areas * 

• Light courts/wells 

• Patient rooms (284) * 

• Nurse's stations and flooring design * 

• Waiting rooms, consultation, rooms, conference rooms and staff lounges * 

• Bridge to existing hospital 

• Stair light well (7 stories) visible from Potrero 



Exterior: 



Center of vehicular turn around at main entry 
Roof garden 

Plaza between new and existing building 
Walkway on south side of building 
Pocket garden (s) 



General Hospital Catalogue of Art Opportunities: 

*Priority 

INTERIOR 

Basement 2 (Radiology; Morgue) 

Waiting Rm. (1)* 

Staff Lounge/conference rooms (3).* 

Radiology, i.e. X-ray, CT -Scan, Ultrasound, x-ray (9) 

Basement 1 (Surgery) 

Surgery Waiting/Reception (I ) * 
Consultation Rooms (2)* 
Staff lounge ( 1 ) 

First Floor (Emergency) 

Admitting and Registration areas (2) * 
Pediatric waiting (1) * 
Main Lobby (atrium/vertical wall) * 
Staff Lounge (2) 

Conference/Consultation Rooms (2)* 
Consult./quiet Rm. (I)* 

2 nd Floor (Women's & Children) 

Nurse's stations (4) * 

Floor * 

Patient rooms (35; 8 pediatric)* 

Bridge to existing Hospital 

Waiting Room ( I ) * 

Family Room (I) * 

Parent's lounge (1) * 

Conference Rooms (2) 

Social Worker ( 1 ) 

Play Rm. (I) 

3 rd Floor (ICU) 

Nurse's stations (8) * 
Floor * 

Patient rooms (38)* 
Exterior Courts (2) 
Waiting Rooms (2) * 
Consultation Rooms (2)* 
Staff Lounge (I) 



4 th Floor (Step-down) 

Nurse's Stations (6) * 

Floor * 

Patient Rooms(45)* 

Exterior Light Court (2) * 

Waiting/multi-purpose Rms. (3) * 

Consultation Rooms/Social Worker (3) 

Staff lounge/conference (2) 

5 th Floor (Medical/Surgery /jail unit) 

Nurse's Stations (4) * 

Floor * 

Patient Rooms (45)* 

Exterior Light Courts (4) * 

Waiting/multi-purpose Rm (2) * 

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Visiting/Interview Rooms (4) * 

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Glass bridge * 

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sfac: April 16, 2008 Page 1 of 3 



San Francisco Arts Commission 

April 16, 2008 






VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, April 16, 2008 

3:00 p.m. DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 
Agenda 



1. Consent 



APR i 4 2008 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



1. Motion to accept into the Civic Art Collection the Abraham Lincoln Brigade National Monument, 
a gift to the city from the Abraham Lincoln Brigade Association, designed by artists Ann 
Chamberlain and Walter Hood and located in Justin Herman Plaza. 

2. Motion to accept into the Civic Art Collection, Namoo House (2008), by Joyce Hsu, an anodized 
aluminum and stainless steel sculptural relief, installed at Gate A-3 of the San Francisco 
International Airport. 

3. Motion to accept into the Civic Art Collection, Take Off 2006 (2006-2008), by Hung Liu, a work 
of oil paint and pigmented ink on wood, installed at Gate A-5 of the San Francisco International 
Airport. 

4. Motion to approve the six original poster designs, to be reproduced and installed in 24 kiosks 
on Market Street from June 12 to September 18, 2008, by artist Owen Smith, for the Art on 
Market Street 2008 Program. 

2. Laguna Honda Hospital 

Susan Pontic us 

Report on the revised proposals of artists Bernie Lubell, Ann Chamberlain, and Diana Pumpelly 
Bates for artworks at Laguna Honda Hospital. 

Motion: Motion to approve Bernie Lubell's revised proposal for the "H" wall at Laguna Honda 
Hospital, which will use the "Air" and "Earth" imagery; Ann Chamberlain's revised proposal for the 
"A" and "D" walls at Laguna Honda Hospital, which replace the black and white images with color 
images; and Diana Pumpelly Bates's revised proposal for the Laguna Honda Hospital gates. 

3. Guideposts by Brian Goggin 

Jill Manton 

Report on alternative sites for the installation of the work Guideposts by artist Brian Goggin. 

4. Relocation of Rabbinoid sculpture 

Jill Manton 

Report on the possibility of relocating the Rabbinoid sculpture by artist Gerald Heffernon to Brooks 

Park. 

5. Exhibition of sculptures by Manolo Valdes in Civic Center Plaza 

Jill Manton 

Provide update on exhibition of Manolo Valdes sculptures in Civic Center Plaza. 



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sfac: April 16, 2008 Page 2 of 3 



6. San Francisco International Airport 

Susan Pontious 

Provide update on the development of the San Francisco International Airport 2008 Memorandum 

of Understanding. 

7. General Hospital 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation of examples of artwork in hospital settings and works from the art program created 

for the Mental Health Rehabilitation Facility at General Hospital. 

8. Central Subway 

Judy Moran 

Explanatory document: Staff report. 

Provide update on the status of the Central Subway Public Art Program. 

9. Coffman Pool 

Susan Pontious 

Explanatory document: Staff report. 

Provide update on the completed installation at Coffman Pool. 

10. New Business 

11. Old Business 

12. Adjournment 

MC 4/11/2008 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts Commission office, 25 
Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during regular business hours. INFO: Mary 
Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic devices are 
prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the removal from the meeting of 
any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell phone, pager, or other similar sound-producing 
electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or administrative action 
may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San Francisco Campaign and Governmental 
Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register and report lobbying activity. For more information 
about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 
Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and http://www.sfgov.org/ethics. 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. Commissions, 
boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct the people's business. This 
ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the people and that City operations are open 



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sfac: April 16, 2008 Page 3 of 3 



to the people's review. For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report 
a violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine 
Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by 
phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at sotf@sfgov.org. 

Citizens interested in obtaining a free copy of the Sunshine Ordinance can request a copy from Mr. 
Darby or by printing Chapter 67 of the San Francisco Administrative Code on the Internet, 
http://www.sfgov.org/sunshine/. 



http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=78916 4/1 1/2008 



Date: Wednesday, April 16, 2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Judy Moran, Project Manager, Public Art 

Re: Current Status of the Central Subway Public Art Program 



Staff is currently moving the Central Subway Public Art Program forward in the 
following areas: 

1. Outreach 

Staff is currently conducting an extensive outreach campaign to artists, primarily in the 
Bay Area, as well as nationally, to supplement the existing Central Subway Artist Pool 
established in 2005. The goal is to create a new, larger artist pool comprising a wide 
variety of artists — emerging and established, local and regional, from a diversity of 
cultures and working in a variety of media — from which the Central Subway Artist 
Selection Panels can commission a dynamic collection of permanent artworks for the 
Central Subway stations and adjacent areas. In addition to several mailings, staff is 
utilizing other more direct outreach methods in order to encourage targeted artists to 
apply, providing in some cases more personal encouragement and support. Staff outreach 
has included, but has not been limited to, the following: 

a. Staff sent the Call for Artists email to the following: over 45 arts organizations 
and galleries, asking them to forward the email to their own artist email lists; 480 
artists and others on the Public Art email list; and over 3,100 artists and arts 
professionals recommended by Arts Commissioners and Arts Commission staff. 

b. Flyers were mailed or delivered to over 15 local arts organizations for public 
distribution and mailed to over 1,300 artists and others on the Public Art mailing 
list. 

c. The Call for Artists information is on the Arts Commission and SFMTA websites, 
with translations in both Chinese and Spanish, and listed in the Public Art 
Competitions section of the April 2008 issue of Artweek. 

d. Public artist application workshops were conducted at the Bayanihan Community 
Center in the South of Market neighborhood and at the Chinese Culture Center in 
Chinatown. Over 150 artists attended both workshops for a demonstration of the 
application process, including procedures for applying to CaFE, an internet 
application service, which the Arts Commission is using for the first time for the 
Central Subway application process. 

e. The Public Art Program co-sponsored two CaFE demonstrations with both the 
Alameda and Oakland Public Art Programs, drawing 250 Bay Area artists. CaFE 



staff flew out from Colorado to lead the workshop, and a local photographer 
demonstrated how to photograph artwork and adapt the images for CaFE. 

f. Additional special outreach efforts continue in the San Francisco Chinese 
community, in order to insure that a representative segment of the Chinese art 
community will apply for the Central Subway Artist Pool. Specific efforts include 
the following: 

i. The Chinatown Community Development Center (CCDC) organized a 

press conference for the Chinese media at the Chinese Culture Center 
(CCC) about the Call for Artists. Over 7 articles have appeared in 
Chinese newspapers regarding the Call for Artists. 

ii. Both the CCC and CCDC are continuing to do personal outreach to 

artists in the Chinese community, providing translation and application 
support services to artists. CCC is hosting a workshop April 7th at 
their facility in Chinatown at which Chinese and Chinese-American 
artists are able to schedule an appointment with CCC staff to assist 
them with their applications. 

g. Public Art staff is assisting some artist applicants with their online CaFE 
application. 

2. Arts Master Plan 

Staff is in the process of developing an outline of the Central Subway Arts Master Plan, 
intended to provide relevant project and neighborhood information and artwork goals and 
guidelines to Arts Commissioners, Arts Commission and other City staff, community 
members, artist selection panelists, artists, and others. The document will be developed 
over the next three or four months with input from Arts Commissioners, representatives 
from the SFMTA and the SFCTA, project architects, a Central Subway Public Art 
Advisory Committee, and community members and organizations, among others. A 
preliminary workbook outlining Central Subway art opportunities is being developed for 
use during the master planning process. 

3. Advisory Committee and Selection Panels 

Three levels of Central Subway Public Art committees/panels will be developed over the 
next two to three months to participate in the Central Subway Artist selection process, 
which is expected to continue through the Spring of 2009. 

a. The Central Subway Public Art Advisory Committee will include a wide range of 
project stakeholders, including representatives from arts, civic, business and other 
organizations along the Central Subway corridor, as well as several artists, 
representatives from the SFMTA and the SFCTA, and an Arts Commissioner, 
among others. This Committee will convene three or four times over the next few 
months at facilitated meetings to provide input for the Central Subway Arts 
Master Plan. 

b. The Central Subway Artist Pool Selection Panel will convene one time to review 
pre-screened artist applications from the current Call for Artists and select artists 



appropriate to supplement the existing Central Subway Artist Pool. This panel 
will include staff representatives from the SFMTA and Central Subway corridor 
communities, project architects, arts professionals, and an Arts Commissioner, 
c. A different Artist Selection Panel will be created for each of the three Central 
Subway stations: Chinatown, Union Square/Market Street, and Moscone. These 
panels will select a short list of artist semifinalists for each previously identified 
station art opportunity at their station in two or three phases over a time period of 
several months. The first selection phase will focus on larger, more architecturally 
integrated artworks in order to provide adequate time for the proposals to be 
incorporated into the construction documents. All short listed artists will be 
interviewed by the station panel that shortlisted them. Some or all of the 
semifinalist artists will be paid to prepare a preliminary proposal prior to their 
station panel interview. The panel will then select a finalist for each art 
opportunity subject to approval by the Arts Commission. 

4. Additional Central Subway Public Art Program consultants 

To date, staff has identified project tasks over the next year for which we expect to need 
expert assistance from the following organizations and consultants: 

a. The Chinese Culture Center and the Chinatown Community Development Center 
will continue to provide project outreach support in the Chinese community. 
CCC's facility will be the site for ongoing community meetings and proposal 
exhibitions, in addition to the current support CCC is providing during the Call 
for Artists. CCC and CCDC will provide both Cantonese and Mandarin 
translation services as needed. CCDC will also continue to translate written 
project documents, as needed, and contact the Chinese media. 

b. An individual consultant is needed to provide additional community outreach and 
project promotion in neighborhoods along the entire Central Subway corridor, 
including planning and facilitation of community meetings and the Central 
Subway Public Art Advisory Committee. 

c. KwanHenmi Architects (the Central Subway station architects) and Ann 
Cervantes Design Associates, both under contract to the SFMTA for the Central 
Subway Project, will each provide architectural and other support to the Arts 
Commission and selected artists. 

5. Site visits to other transit art programs 

Central Subway Project Manager Judy Moran just met with the LA Metro Arts Director, 
Jorge Pardo, in Los Angeles to discuss their program and transit artwork experiences, and 
visited several Los Angeles subway stations. She will be meeting with Sandra 
Bloodworm, Director of the New York MTA Public Art Program and tour numerous 
stations in New York the fourth week in April, 2008. 



Date: Wednesday, April 16, 2008 
To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 
From: Susan Pontious, Deputy Director, Public Art 
Re: Coffman Pool 



The Coffman Pool artwork, The Swimmers, by Steve Gillman and Katherine Keefer has 
been installed. The artwork consists of two 12' x 16' banks of windows that have 
digitally printed photographs of children using the pool laminated into the glass. 

Overall, the installation is very effective: dramatic without being overbearing. 

One problem is that a couple of the panels do not match the color balance of the rest of 
the panels. One of these is a very obvious mismatch, and two others are more marginal. 
The one panel is definitely being reprinted, and the other two are being evaluated for the 
need for replacement. 



sfac: April 16, 2008 



Page 1 of 7 



San Francisco Arts Commission 



TEXT ONLY: 
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PRINT: 

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April 16, 2008 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, April 16, 2008 

3:00 p.m. 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 

Minutes 

Commissioners Present: 

Jeannene Przyblyski, Leonard Hunter, Lawrence Rinder, Dede Wilsey 
Absent: Pop Zhao 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

APR 2 9 2008 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Staff Present: 

Mary Chou, Allison Cummings, Carol Marie Daniels, Jill Manton, Judy Moran, Susan Pontious, Ellen 
Shershow 

Note: All votes are unanimous unless recorded otherwise. 

The meeting commenced at 3:11 p.m. 



1. Consent 

1. Motion to accept into the Civic Art Collection the Abraham Lincoln Brigade National Monument, 
a gift to the City from the Abraham Lincoln Brigade Association, designed by artists Ann 
Chamberlain and Walter Hood and located in Justin Herman Plaza. 

2. Motion to accept into the Civic Art Collection Namoo House (2008), by Joyce Hsu, an anodized 
aluminum and stainless steel sculptural relief, installed at Gate A-3 of the San Francisco 
International Airport. 

3. Motion to accept into the Civic Art Collection, Take Off 2006 (2006-2008), by Hung Liu, a work 
of oil paint and pigmented ink on wood, installed at Gate A-5 of the San Francisco International 
Airport. 

4. Motion to approve the six original poster designs, to be reproduced and installed in 24 kiosks 
on Market Street from June 12 to September 18, 2008, by artist Owen Smith, for the Art on 
Market Street 2008 Program. 

Motion: Motion to adopt the consent calendar items. 
Moved: Wilsey/Rinder 



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sfac: April 16, 2008 Page 2 of 7 



2. Laguna Honda Hospital 

Public Art Program Deputy Director Susan Pontious presented minor changes to the work of artists 
Bernie Lubell and Ann Chamberlain for Laguna Honda Hospital. The work for the "A" and "D" walls 
has been changed from black-and-white to color images. Due to the lighting of the piece proposed 
for the "H" wall, the artists have decided to use imagery of the earth and sky, instead of fire and 
water, so that the subtleties of color on the surface of the work can be viewed in the available 
lighting. 

Ms. Pontious then presented the revised design of Diana Pumpelly Bates's gates, which have more 
distinct cuts through the stainless steel. Commissioners agreed to the minor design changes for 
each of the works presented. 

THIS MOTION HAS BEEN AMENDED 

Motion: Motion to approve Bernie Lubell and Ann Chamberlain's revised proposals for the "H" 

wall, which will use imagery of the air and earth, and the "A" and "D" walls, which replace the 

black and white images with color images, at Laguna Honda Hospital. 

Moved: Rinder/Hunter 

THIS MOTION HAS BEEN AMENDED 

Motion: Motion to approve Diana Pumpelly Bates's revised proposal for the Laguna Honda 

Hospital gates. 

Moved: Rinder/Wilsey 

3. Guideposts by Brian Goggin 

Public Art Program Director Jill Manton reported on the relocation of artist Brian Goggin's work 
titled Guideposts. The sculpture was originally commissioned for Moscone Recreation Center, and 
then proposed for a lawn area north of Sava Pool. Upon conducting outreach to surrounding 
neighbors, staff learned of opposition to the sculpture. Rather than waging a campaign for this 
site, staff will seek an alternative site for the sculpture. Ms. Manton reported that the Recreation 
and Park Department suggested Brooks Park as a potential alternative. 

Commissioner Leonard Hunter stated that he is familiar with Brooks Park and feels the community 
would be receptive to Brian Goggin's work for that location. Ms. Manton said she will further 
investigate the site. 

4. Relocation of Rabbinoid sculpture 

Ms. Manton reported on the possibility of relocating the Rabbinoid sculpture by artist Gerald 
Heffernon to Brooks Park. The sculpture will be removed from its current location in Stern Grove 
due to repeated acts of vandalism, and the proposed alternative of Esprit Park did not have the 
support of its neighborhood association. 

Commissioners believed Brooks Park would be a nice alternative. Commissioner Jeannene 
Przyblyski stated that perhaps a more effective process for relocating works is to contact 
Supervisors, who in turn would contact their constituents to let them know about the possibility of 
having a particular artwork for their neighborhood. 

5. Exhibition of sculptures by Manolo Valdes in Civic Center Plaza 

Ms. Manton reported on the installation of the eight Manolo Valdes sculptures which will begin on 
Sunday, April 27, 2008. A dedication is scheduled for Tuesday, April 29, but the time has not yet 
been determined, pending the Mayor's availability. The artist will attend the dedication, as well as 
representatives from Marlborough Gallery, who funded a large portion of the project costs. The 
installation cost escalated due to engineering requirements resulting from the Arts Commission 



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sfac: April 16, 2008 Page 3 of 7 



not being allowed to anchor the sculpture to the plaza paving. Ms. Manton reported that she is 
optimistic about receiving $10,000 from Grants for the Arts for this project. Ms. Manton also 
stated that wooden curbs will be constructed around three of the sculptures for ADA compliance. 
She will inform the Commissioners of the exact time of the dedication when it has been 
confirmed. 

San Francisco International Airport 

Ms. Pontious reported on negotiations with the San Francisco International Airport on the 2008 
Memorandum of Understanding ("MOU"), which focuses on how to manage the maintenance of 
the Airport Collection. The last time the ordinance was changed, it allowed five percent of the two 
percent for art to be allocated to maintenance if the funding source permitted. Unfortunately, 
bonds do not allow for the funding to be used for maintenance. Ms. Pontious described meetings 
that she and Ms. Manton had with Peter Nardoza, former Deputy Director of the Airport, and Blake 
Summers, Director and Chief Curator of the San Francisco Airport Museums, about how to best 
address the challenge of maintaining the Airport Collection. At a meeting held in October 2006, 
staff of both departments agreed that Airport staff would handle the routine care of the works, 
which includes dusting and changing light bulbs, while Arts Commission staff would be responsible 
for larger maintenance projects that require conservators, the artist, and other outside 
contractors. At that meeting, there was no mention of art enrichment being charged for this work. 
Rather, an annual budget request would be made to the Airport Commission by the Arts 
Commission for any special maintenance projects and for a contribution towards Arts Commission 
staff time. 

However, over a year later, when the Arts Commission finally received a draft of the new 
Memorandum of Understanding, the Airport proposed reducing the money for art enrichment 
taken from bond funds and paying for maintenance from operating costs. The benefit of this 
arrangement is that it gives the Arts Commission a legal source of funds to pay for maintenance. 
The Airport has proposed a sliding scale for determining art enrichment on capital projects, which 
would reduce the funding for art, but increase the funding for maintenance. Presumably the total 
amount for art and maintenance would be equal to two percent. The most recent draft of the MOU 
prepared by Airport staff proposes reducing the art enrichment allocation to correspond to annual 
allocations for maintenance to be paid out of Airport operating funds. When the art enrichment 
funds are exhausted, the Arts Commission would run a deficit against future art enrichment 
funding for maintenance of the Airport Collection. Ms. Pontious prepared a spreadsheet for Ms. 
Manton and Director of Cultural Affairs Luis Cancel with a projection of the long-term financial 
impact of such a proposal. Included in the Airport's proposal is the annualization of the cost of an 
Airport Museum staff person to manage maintenance of the Airport Collection and a $50,000 
facilities fund that the Airport would charge against for such costs as the changing of light bulbs. 

Ms. Pontious stated that she is not comfortable with the possibility of going into debt until the 
next series of renovations are made. History has shown that renovations usually occur every 10 
years, but this is not guaranteed. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that part of the problem with the current funding structure is that 
Art Enrichment money is a one-time sum and operating money is a flow of money over time, as is 
maintenance. A maintenance endowment should be created to stabilize this money source. 
However, the amount of money set aside from Art Enrichment for the endowment needs to be 
significant enough to make a difference. 

Ms. Manton stated that the Airport now wants to charge for maintenance tasks, such as changing 
light bulbs, that they used to provide at no cost to the Arts Commission and that they want to hire 
a full-time staff person at the Airport for Arts Commission-related work. Ms. Manton stated that 



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sfac: April 16, 2008 Page 4 of 7 



she would prefer to hire a full-time staff person at the Arts Commission to work with Ms. Pontious, 
rather than have this position reside at the Airport. 

Ms. Pontious stated that there is an advantage to having a staff person located at the Airport as it 
is time-consuming and costly for Arts Commission staff to arrange for maintenance to be 
completed on works in the Airport. Ms. Pontious said that she is not opposed to being flexible in 
allocating more maintenance funds from art enrichment, but the program can't sustain the entire 
cost of maintenance, particularly when it is expected to carry fixed overhead costs. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that if the Airport is mandated by charter to spend a certain 
amount of money on acquisitions for permanent artworks, then the Airport should not have much 
discretion between temporary and permanent works because it is a revenue-generating agency. 
She believes the final decision will have to be made between Mr. Cancel, Airport Director John 
Martin, and the City Administrator who oversees the Airport, as it is a matter of the City's 
resources. 

Commissioner Hunter stated that the most Arts Commission staff can do is to demonstrate the 
inability of the program to continue with its current funding structure. Commissioner Przyblyski 
stated that the permanent collection at the Airport could be as much, if not more, of a draw than 
the temporary exhibits if more attention were given to these permanent works. 

General Hospital 

Ms. Pontious presented examples of artwork selected for the Mental Health Rehabilitation Facility 
("MHRF") at General Hospital. MHRF functions as a transition facility between acute emergency 
care and the community. Ms. Pontious was given strict guidelines by General Hospital staff for the 
selection of works at MHRF: reality-based works showing positive interaction between people, 
positive ethnic images, family interaction, and works showing landscapes and still-'lifes. During her 
slide presentation, she noted that the paintings by Hilda Shum were quite successful in masking 
the columns with scenes of nature, and the tile work by Johanna Poethig was successful in its 
collaboration with patients and its focus on life stories, aspirations, and goals. The group of artists 
selected to create works in the hospital matched the ethnic population of its patients. Ms. Pontious 
summarized that the collection at MHRF, while following the guidelines set by the hospital, was 
quite eclectic and did not feel institutional. 

Ms. Pontious discussed with Commissioners the different sites for artwork in the new San 
Francisco General Hospital. The design of floors could be an opportunity for work that breaks up 
the space for patients who walk up and down the hallways for exercise. The lobby is another main 
area for artwork, as well as the outdoor walkway by the side of the hospital, where the heart 
sculptures may be placed. Other possible locations are the landscaped areas on the roof and the 
area within the parking circle. It will be important to select works that are appropriate for the site, 
such as an uplifting and sensational work for the entry circle, and something more calming and 
contemplative for the waiting rooms. 

Commissioner Przyblyski was satisfied with the placement of the heart sculptures along the 
outdoor passageway on the side of the hospital. She inquired about the reference in the staff 
report to the existing collection of work at General Hospital. Ms. Pontious responded that much of 
the existing collection is not in good condition, and some of the works are not appropriate for a 
hospital setting. The works should be reframed and reinstalled, possibly in the old building, which 
will be used for administrative offices. Ms. Pontious noted that there is a sculpture by Gerald 
Warburg that will need to be relocated, as well as a painting which was badly damaged and shoulc 
be restored before it is returned to the artist. 



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sfac: April 16, 2008 Page 5 of 7 



Commissioner Lawrence Rinder stated that he is on the board of an organization called RxArt in 
New York that gives art to hospitals and has a good network of artists. Diane Brown is the 
president; Commissioner Rinder will provide Ms. Pontious with her contact information. 

In response to the presentation of work at MHRF, Commissioner Przyblyski commented that even 
within this notion of "evidence-based design" there seems to be a lot of possibility in the type of 
artworks that fit within the guidelines. She agrees that when commissioning work for places 
where people do not feel well or where they have a high-level of anxiety, it would make sense to 
have art that helps relieve stress and uplift spirits. Ms. Pontious stated that she would like to 
create works that undercut the institutional, sterile, and stern environment of the hospital. 

Commissioner Dede Wilsey stated that the psychology of color is an important element in the 
design of hospitals. She explained that she is involved with fundraising efforts for the new UCSF 
hospital at Mission Bay and has had the opportunity to tour many hospitals. Commissioner Wilsey 
emphasized the importance of having calming spaces and works that distract patients and visitors 
from the passage of time. Commissioner Hunter mentioned Paul Kos's work, Chartres Bleu, which 
captures the changing light through the stained glass windows of the Chartres Cathedral. 

Commissioner Rinder inquired about who was responsible for the wall color at General Hospital 
since it appears to be an important element of the design. Ms. Pontious stated that it is likely that 
interior designers will be responsible for the wall color. 

Central Subway 

Project Manager Judy Moran provided an update on the Central Subway Public Art Program 
including the ongoing extensive outreach efforts by staff, which includes conducting three artist 
workshops, and an intensive collaboration effort with the Chinese Culture Center and Chinese 
Community Development Center. Next steps will include the development of a Central Subway 
Public Art Advisory Committee, as well as an Artist Pool Selection Panel and, eventually, 
determination of Artist Selection Panels for each station. Staff has also developed a rough outline 
for the content of the Central Subway Arts Master Plan. Ms. Moran met with Jorge Pardo, Director 
of the Los Angeles Metro Public Art Program, and will meet with Sandra Bloodworth, Director of 
the New York MTA Arts for Transit Program, to discuss their experiences with developing and 
maintaining artworks in an urban subway system. For the Visual Arts Committee meeting in May, 
Ms. Moran intends to provide Commissioners with a preliminary workbook for their review and 
feedback that begins to focus the overall vision for the Central Subway Art Program as well as to 
further articulate art opportunities at each station. Ms. Moran reported that work continues on 
finalizing the Art Enrichment budget amount for the Central Subway Public Art Program. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that it is important for the Central Subway Public Art Advisory 
Committee to have a written scope of work so that their roles in the process are clearly defined. 
Ms. Moran stated that the role of the Advisory Committee will be limited to the development of 
the Arts Master Plan. In order to clarify their role, Ms. Manton suggested that the panel be called 
the Arts Master Plan Advisory Committee. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that she believes stakeholder interest in the Central Subway will 
concentrate and disperse based on the station in question, and that it would be good to engage 
the transportation advocacy community in the planning process because they represent city-wide 
interests. Ms. Moran emphasized that in regard to the Central Subway public art planning process, 
it is important to have input from Commissioners early in the planning stage both in terms of 
process and aesthetics. 

Commissioner Hunter inquired about the period of time between the selection of the art proposals 



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sfac: April 16, 2008 Page 6 of 7 



and the installation of the artists' works. Ms. Moran responded that the system will begin 
operating in 2016 at the earliest, so there will be a lead time of approximately six or more years 
between the final designs of the artworks and their implementation, as with the Third Street Light 
Rail Art Program. Ms. Moran stated that within that time, the Arts Commission will commission a 
series of occasional transit-related temporary art programs in neighborhoods along the Central 
Subway corridor in collaboration with existing organizations and communities to keep people 
involved and aware of the project. Commissioner Hunter thought this was a great idea and noted 
the effectiveness of the program of temporary works in Sacramento that engage the community. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that although she has previously advocated for Commissioner 
participation on every project artist selection panel, she has realized that a Commissioner's role 
on a panels in some cases has expanded to include project mediation. However, she also 
appreciated the value of the Commissioners' broad overview of a project as a panelist because of 
their broader involvement in and oversight of the public art collection at large and of the complete 
process for each project. 

9. Coffman Pool 

Ms. Pontious announced that the installation of work by artist team Steve Gillman and Katherine 
Keefer at Coffman Pool has been completed and is quite successful. She stated that one glass 
panel is being re-fabricated and replaced because the color doesn't match with the rest of the 
panels. There were also two other panels that may have been slightly off in color, but the 
variation is so slight, both in the morning and afternoon light, that it is almost unnoticeable. The 
pool will not open for at least another month. 

10. New Business 

Ms. Manton was proud to report that the Jay DeFeo painting, Masquerade in Black, loaned by the 
Arts Commission to the de Young Museum, is currently on display at the Museum. Ms. Manton 
reminded Commissioners that the work had previously been in storage for the past 12 years after 
it was removed from the Airport. Ms. Manton inquired about the possibility of doing a press 
release or having a reception at the de Young Museum to bring attention to the painting and let 
the public know that such an important work is available for viewing. Commissioner Wilsey agreed 
that a reception is a great idea, along with publicizing the work in the Museum's magazine. 

Ms. Manton reported that with a new Director of Cultural Affairs, it is a good time to reevaluate 
the public art ordinance and the way in which the Public Art Program proceeds with projects. Ms. 
Manton would like the Public Art Program to manage fewer projects and allow artists to engage in 
a longer-term and more constructive relationship with the communities and neighborhoods where 
they create artwork. 

Commissioner Hunter inquired about which departments allow for the pooling of funds. Ms. 
Manton responded that the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission is the only department that 
allows this pooling and the money is used for temporary projects. Commissioner Przyblyski 
inquired about the pooling of funds for the branch library improvement projects. Ms. Manton 
responded that the total amount of art enrichment funding generated from improvements at 
several branch libraries was divided equally among all eligible projects at the branch libraries. 

Commissioner Rinder asked if such a proposed policy change would have to be considered by the 
Board of Supervisors. Ms. Manton responded that it could be done at the executive level because 
the ordinance already allows for funds to be pooled. 

11. Old Business 



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sfac: April 16, 2008 Page 7 of 7 

There was no other old business. 

12. Adjournment 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:51 p.m. 
MC 4/21/08 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts Commission office, 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during regular business hours. INFO: Mary 
Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic devices are 
prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the removal from the meeting of 
any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell phone, pager, or other similar sound- 
producing electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or administrative action 
may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San Francisco Campaign and Governmental 
Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register and report lobbying activity. For more information 
about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 
Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 
http ://www. sfgov.org/ethics. 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. Commissions, 
boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct the people's business. This 
ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the people and that City operations are open 
to the people's review. For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report 
a violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine 
Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by 
phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at sotf@sfgov.org. 

Citizens interested in obtaining a free copy of the Sunshine Ordinance can request a copy from Mr. 
Darby or by printing Chapter 67 of the San Francisco Administrative Code on the Internet, 
http://www.sfgov.org/sunshine/. 



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sfac:May21,2008 



Page 1 of 5 



San Francisco Arts Commission 



TEXT ONLY: 

□ 

PRINT: 



TEXT SIZE: 

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May 21, 2008 



VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, May 21, 2008 

3:00 p.m. 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 



19- 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 



Agenda 



1. Consent 



MAY 1 9 20C8 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



1. Motion to approve an exhibition organized by San Francisco General Hospital's Cancer 
Awareness, Resources and Education (CARE) Program of portraits by photographer Nicole Franco 
in the cafeteria of San Francisco General Hospital. 

2. Motion to accept into the Civic Art Collection the Harvey Milk commemorative bronze sculpture 
and base (2008), a gift to the city from the Harvey Milk City Hall Memorial Committee. The 
sculpture, designed by Daub, Firmin, Hendrickson Sculpture Group, is located in the Supervisors 
Ceremonial Rotunda at City Hall. 

3. Motion to approve a mural by artist Norm Stien with assistance from artists Victor Reyes and 
Amanda Lynn, to be installed for a period not to exceed six months, on the outer perimeter wall ol 
the skate park as part of the improvements at Potrero del Sol and Rolph Playgrounds, pending 
approval from the Recreation and Park Commission on June 5, 2008. 

4. Motion to approve a series of high resolution chalk stencils of historical photographs on the 
sidewalks outside of 15 major theatres and art museums throughout the civic center and 
downtown San Francisco by artists Jessica Tully and Kim Munson, as part of Yerba Buena Center 
for the Arts' visual arts exhibition, Bay Area Now 5. This will involve a two step process; four 
temporary spray chalk designs installed in four locations during the week of June 9, followed by a 
second series commencing July 11 and continuing through October 19, 2008 in all 15 locations. 

5. Motion to approve an increase in the current total contract budget amount of $35,000 by $750 
for additional required engineering costs for artist Scott Donahue's Contract Number 
POAR004000098 to design, fabricate and install an artwork for the renovated Richmond Branch 
Library for a new total contract budget amount of $35,750. 

2. Gallery - 155 Grove Street installations 

Meg Shi t Tier 

Presentation on the next 155 Grove Street exhibition by artist Paul Hayes, to be installed on May 



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5/16/2008 



sfac: May 2 1 , 2008 Page 2 of 



30, 2008. 

Motion: Motion to approve an honorarium in the amount of $500 for artist Paul Hayes for his 
installation at 155 Grove Street, to be installed May 30, 2008. 

3. Gallery - Bill Fontana at City Hall 

Meg Shiffler 

Report on the status of the upcoming Bill Fontana exhibition at City Hall. Materials provided 
include a proposed schedule of events leading up to the exhibition, a written description of the 
installation, and a budget. 

Motion: Motion for the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into a contract with Bill Fontana for the 
creation, installation and de-installation of a temporary sound art installation at City Hall 
scheduled to open in late January 2009. The contract amount shall not exceed $68,000. 

4. Patricia's Green - Temporary Sculpture Proposal 

Jill Man ton 

Report on the possibility of a temporary exhibition of Tony Labat's Peace Sign sculpture in 
Patricia's Green. 

Motion: Motion to approve the temporary display of the Peace Sign sculpture by Tony Labat from 
October 15, 2008 to June 15, 2009 in Patricia's Green pending the availability of funds from the 
PUC art enrichment reserve, support for the project from the Hayes Valley Neighborhood 
Association, and permit approval from the Recreation and Park Department. 

5. Civic Center Plaza-Temporary Sculpture Proposal 

Jill Man ton 

Report on the possibility of installing an artwork utilizing recycled tree branches by artist Patrick 
Dougherty in Civic Center Plaza during the winter of 2009. 

Motion: Motion to award the artist Patrick Dougherty an honorarium of $750 to develop a site 
specific proposal for the Civic Center Plaza to be implemented in winter of 2009. 

6. Sunnyside Conservatory 

Judy Moran 

Presentation of the preliminary proposal by the artist team Wowhaus, recommended by the 
Sunnyside Conservatory Artist Selection Committee for implementation of an artwork for the 
Sunnyside Conservatory. 

Motion: Motion to approve the artist team Wowhaus for their proposal for the Sunnyside 
Conservatory, as recommended by the Sunnyside Conservatory Artist Selection Committee. 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with the artist 
team Wowhaus for the final design, fabrication, and transportation of an artwork for the 
Sunnyside Conservatory. 

7. Sava Pool 

Judy Moran 



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J 



sfac: May 2 1 , 2008 Page 3 of 5 



Presentation of the final design of artist Catherine Wagner's artwork for permanent installation at 
the Larsen Park Sava Pool Natatorium. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final design by artist Catherine Wagner of porcelain enamel panels 
for permanent installation at the Larsen Park Sava Pool Natatorium and authorization for the artist 
to proceed to fabrication of the artwork. 

8. Franklin Square 

Susan Pontious 
Staff report 

Report on the use of art enrichment funds generated by the renovation of Franklin Square Park 
for the engineering fees associated with the design of a support wall for Anthony Stellon's mosaic 
mural, Brotherhood of Man. 

Motion: Motion to approve use of $28,000 art enrichment funds generated by the renovation of 
Franklin Square Park for architectural and engineering fees to design a support wall for Anthony 
Stellon's mosaic mural, Brotherhood of Man. 

9. San Francisco International Airport 

Susan Pontious 

Report on the Memorandum of Understanding between the Airport and the Arts Commission. 

Motion: Motion to approve a Memorandum of Understanding between the Airport and Arts 
Commission, which shall apply to art enrichment and art maintenance expenses between July 1, 
2007 and June 30, 2017, and which outlines the procedures and policies for the selection of art 
for the airport and collection management responsibilities, art enrichment funding formulas, and 
other issues related to the coordination and cooperation between the Airport and the Arts 
Commission relative to the Public Art Program at the Airport. 

10. Junipero Serra Playground 

Tonia Macneil 

Report on the completion of artwork at Junipero Serra Playground by artist Bean Finneran and 
presentation of the images of installed artwork. 

Motion: Motion to approve the untitled ceramic tile artwork for Junipero Serra Playground by the 
artist Bean Finneran as installed. 

Motion: Motion to accept into the Civic Art Collection of the City and County of San Francisco the 
untitled ceramic tile artwork by Bean Finneran for Junipero Serra Playground. 

11. Gallery - SFAC Gallery exhibition at 410 Van Ness 

Meg Shiffler 

Presentation on the next SFAC Gallery exhibition at 401 Van Ness titled Resisting Dominion, on 
view from June 12 to August 16, 2008. The exhibition will feature Tiffany Bozic (Oakland), James 
Drake (Sante Fe), Leiv Fagereng (Portland), Walton Ford (Great Barrington, MA), and Tara Tucker 
(San Francisco). 



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sfac: May 2 1 , 2008 Page 4 of 5 



12. Gallery - Fundraising programs 

Meg Shiftier 

Presentation on a new series of fundraising programs spearheaded by the SFAC Gallery Advisory 
Board. The first of these programs, ON YOUR MARK, will take place on Saturday, June 14, 2008 
from 6 to 8 pm at Electric Works Gallery, and will feature a print demonstration and talk by 
emerging artist Ala Ebtekar. Tickets are $100 each and the ticket price can be applied to the 
purchase of a print. 

13. Gallery - Exhibition schedule 

Meg Shiffler 

Report on a proposed change in the Gallery's exhibition schedule for the calendar year of 2009. 

14. Standards and Guidelines for Busts in City Hall 

Jill Man ton 

Discussion of the consistency of materials used for busts and pedestals in City Hall. 

15. Art on Market Street Program 

Judy Moran 

Presentation of artist proposals for consideration for the 2008/2009 Art on Market Street Program. 

16. Central Subway 

Judy Moran 

Update on status of the Central Subway Public Art Program. 

17. New Business 

18. Old Business 

19. Adjournment 

MC 5/16/2008 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts Commission office, 25 
Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during regular business hours. INFO: Mary 
Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic devices are 
prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the removal from the meeting of 
any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell phone, pager, or other similar sound-producing 
electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or administrative action 
may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San Francisco Campaign and Governmental 
Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register and report lobbying activity. For more information 



http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=8 1039 5/ 1 6/2008 



sfac: May 2 1 , 2008 Page 5 of 5 



about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 
Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 
http://www.sfgov.org/ethics. 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Governmenta€™s duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. 
Commissions, boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct the 
peop!ea€™s business. This ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the people and 
that City operations are open to the peoplea€™s review. For more information on your rights under the 
Sunshine Ordinance or to report a violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to 
Interim Administrator, Sunshine Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San 
Francisco CA 94102-4689; by phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at 
sotf@sfgov.org. 

Citizens interested in obtaining a free copy of the Sunshine Ordinance can request a copy from Mr. 
Darby or by printing Chapter 67 of the San Francisco Administrative Code on the Internet, 
http://www.sfgov.org/sunshine/. 



http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp7iaV81039 5/16/2008 



Potrero del Sol Skate Park Wall Mural Proposal 
Evidence of Community Support 

The skaters building and looking forward to skating Potrero del Sol 
Skate Park were very concerned about graffiti on the skate surfaces and its 
detrimental impact on the skate surface. In order to try and deter tagging 
inside the park Friends of Potrero del Sol organized and held a fundraiser to 
pay for the installation of a mural on the outside of the skate park wall. The 
idea is that if the outside wall is painted by local artists in the skating 
community then the space appears complete and street taggers will not come 
and paint in the park. 

In October of 2007 Friends of Potrero del Sol held an art auction and 
raffle at Amber on Church Street. Over 40 pieces of art were auctioned off. 
They included art done by local skateboard graphic designers, well known 
tattoo artists, photographs and a couple of pieces by Buena Vista Elem. 
students. The raffle was for five large lots of skate merchandise, haircuts, 
tattoo time, music, etc. Over 1 50 people attended the event, including the 
skate park builders, musicians, professional skaters, local skateboard 
manufacturers and shop owners. Enough money was raised to pay for the 
artists'materials for the mural and the time will be donated. 

The skate park has been very much anticipated in the San Francisco 
skating community and beyond since the idea was first raised in 2003. 
There is a strong sense of ownership by the local artists/skater community 
and this will be further reinforced by allowing a local artist to paint a mural 
on the outside of the park walls. 

This project is supported by the following individuals and 
organizations: 

Alfredo Pedroza, Mayors Office of Neighborhood Services, D9 
Jim Lazarus, Recreation and Parks Commission 
Neighborhood Parks Council, Isabel Wade 
Buena Vista Elementary School PTA 

Lower 24 Street Merchants and Neighbors Association, Eric Arguello 
Rolph Playground Neighbors Assoc, Leora Vestel 
Jeanne Darrah, Park and Rec. Open Space Advisory Comte., D9 
Friends of Potrero del Sol Park 
Artwork Rebels 



Funding 

The paint will be paid for by Friends of Potrero del Sol Park and the 
artists' time will be donated. RPD will pay for and install the temporary 
surface to be painted on. 

Timeline 

The preparation will be done on Friday, June 13 th 2008 and Norm will 
work with a small group of artists during Saturday and Sunday, June 14 th to 
complete the mural installation. 

Maintenance Plan 

Timothy Moore 415 680-5653 will work with Joseph Padilla, the 
Recreation and Parks Department Painter Supervisor 415 753-7016 to 
maintain the mural. RPD will paint anti-graffiti paint over the mural once it 
is completed. 

In addition to maintaining the temporary mural, Timothy Moore has 
organized Jason Clemoff and a group of skaters who live in the 
neighborhood to voluntarily clean graffiti off of the skate park's skate 
surfaces. No anti-graffiti paint will be put on the skate surfaces. This will 
be overseen by Joeseph Padilla also. 









NORM STIEN 

As a long-time resident of San Francisco, Norm grew up with the 
artistic community of the inner city impacting his stylistic 
expression. Today you can see his murals around the world. Norm 
has traveled to many different countries Korea, Japan, Europe, and 
Australia for installations. He works in several media. Norm does 
murals, fine painting, tattooing, machining, and silk screening to 
name a few. His world intersects the current aesthetics of skater, 
tattoo and street art. 

Norm has been published in magazines like our local Juxtapose, 
Thrasher. His work has also been featured in Piece by Piece and 
Infamy documentaries. 

Corporations like Coke a Cola and Scion, seeking to appeal to 
today's youth, have commissioned his work. 7th letter, a local 
manufacturer of limited run clothing and jewelry, uses his designs. 

In order to continue to excel in his art and refine his techniques, 
Norm has taken many different accredited classes at various local 
institutions. 

Norm's images can be found on sights such as flicker.com and 
my space. He has thousands of people who photograph and post his 
art for other to enjoy. He works with a group of local artists and 
invites younger art students to participate in his installations. His 
work and methods are at the forefront of contemporary "street" art, 
and is a great influence to many communities. 




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Staff Report 
Date: 5/15/08 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 
From: Susan Pontious 
RE: Airport Memorandum of Understanding 

Attached is the draft of a Memorandum of Understanding between the Arts Commission and 
Airport that will replace the 1995 MOU that was enacted for the Master Plan Projects (i.e. the 
new International Terminal and other support buildings.) The new MOU is for a ten year period 
(2007-2017) and covers capital projects for the Secure Connector ($12 million), Terminal 2 ($220 
million) and possibly T-l (construction budget not established). 

In summary, the most significant change in this MOU is the Airport's proposal to fund the 
ongoing maintenance and conservation of the art collection out of its annual operating budget in 
exchange for a reduction of its art enrichment requirement out of capital funds. 

Background: 

Under the 1995 MOU and prior to the revision of the 1969 Art Enrichment Ordinance, the Arts 
Commission received 1.5% art enrichment from Airport Capital Projects. This was the formula 
used for the $750 million master plan projects (MMP), which generated $11.1 million art 
enrichment; including our $450 million maintenance endowment. This was possible only because 
one project, the rental car facility, was funded from a funding source legal to use for maintenance. 
This is not possible with most projects, which are funded by non-taxable bonds. 

Maintenance of the artwork has been a matter of contention between the Airport and the Arts 
Commission since the early days of the program. Since 2000, the maintenance and conservation 
of artworks in the Airport collection have been funded from the annual interest on the $465 
million endowment (which varies with interest rates between $1 1,000-$20,000 annually.) The 
cost of repairs and replacement of bases, cases and frames has been charged to art enrichment as 
per the 1995 MOU. The Airport has performed minimal maintenance of changing light bulbs and 
dusting the tops of cases. 

Establishing the endowment was a helpful step in supporting the maintenance of the collection, 
but the interest generated from this fund falls far short of what is needed to fully maintain this 
very valuable collection of some 100 artworks. This fund will fall even shorter of the need as the 
collection grows as a result of new capital projects scheduled over the next 10 years. These 
projects will not be funded by a source that would allow a maintenance allocation. This proposed 
MOU provides a solution to this problem. 

Proposed Changes : 

1. The M.O.U. establishes a pre-determined, incremental sliding scale for calculating art 

enrichment from capital bond funds as follows:. Please see attached spread sheet for 
comparison of art enrichment generated from a flat 2% formula and funds generated 
using the sliding scale. 

a. First $100 million: 2% 

b. Next $100 million: 1.75% 

c. Next $800 million: 1.50% 

d. Costs over $1 billion: 1% 



2. The Airport assumes the annual costs of maintaining the collection out of its 
operating budget . Routine maintenance and repairs would be performed by the 
Airport staff, including a new Assoc. Registrar hired by the Museum and Exhibitions 
program for this purpose. 

3. The Arts Commission would be responsible for the maintenance and conservation 
work that involved either the original artist, or professional conservators. This work 
would be funded from two sources: the annual interest from the maintenance 
endowment and an annual allocation from the Airport operating budget . 

4. The Arts Commission and Airport staff would prepare an annual maintenance plan 
and budget by Oct. 1 st of each fiscal year to submit to the Airport Commission for 
funding projected annual maintenance costs. The Arts Commission and Airport will 
enter into an annual MOU for the use of these annually allocated funds. 

Pros and Cons of the MOU: 



I believe that this is an equitable arrangement. Capital funds are one-time funding. Maintenance 
is forever. Please look at the comparison of the Art Commission's reduction in Art Enrichment 
funds vs. what the Airport might be projected to spend on maintenance over 10 years (assuming 
an ongoing expenditure of $150,000 annually) on the attached spread sheet.. Please note that the 
$150,000 figure is the budget figure for FY 07/08 and FY 08/09. For the sake of this 
demonstration, I projected this figure out over 10 years to show what the Airport's obligation 
might total over time. In fact, this figure can be expected to fluctuate annually depending on 
what the Arts Commission anticipates as its conservation needs in any given year. 

The main negative in the MOU is the decrease from the full 2% in Art Enrichment funding we 
could demand under the ordinance. Concern has been expressed that other departments might use 
this precedent as an argument for decreasing their AE obligation. I would argue that while other 
departments might want to reduce their art enrichment, few, if any, can provide the same benefits 
as a "trade". The Airport is unique from other departments for the following reasons: 

• The Airport predictably engages in major capital projects every 10 years or so. As a 
result, it has an ever increasing collection of artwork in need of maintenance. 

• The Airport has the most valuable collection in the city outside of the fine arts museums, 
thereby requiring an even higher responsibility for stewardship of these assets. 

• As a revenue department, the Airport can afford to commit to allocating operating funds 
to the maintenance of its collection that other departments cannot. 

• The Airport Museum and Exhibition program is an accredited museum. As such, the 
Airport has qualified personnel to attend to the maintenance of the collection, and to 
assist the Arts Commission in developing the annual maintenance plan. 

The main advantage of the MOU is that it commits the Airport to taking financial responsibility 
for maintaining its collection, and makes the Airport and Arts Commission partners in developing 
and executing an annual plan based on the needs of the collection. It provides reliable, ongoing 
funding that never has been available for maintenance, and for which there is no other source. At 
the same time Art Enrichment, while less than the full 2% mandated by the ordinance, 
nonetheless exceeds the 1.5% percentage we have historically received from the Airport. The 
proposed agreement would seem to ensure that the Arts Commission will be able to continue to 
acquire outstanding works of art for the Airport, and have the means of protecting and 
maintaining this important asset. 



Legal Requirements of the Ordinance 

In order for the Airport to reduce the flat 2% AE requirement, they must, in accordance with the 

ordinance, submit a letter to the Arts Commission stating 2% is an inappropriate allocation. As 

per the ordinance, if the two parties cannot agree on the allocation, the matter must be submitted 

to the mayor for resolution. It is my understanding that the Airport's attorney is preparing this 

letter.. 

The steps to approving the MOU as drafted include first approving the Airport's request to reduce 
the 2% art enrichment allocation from the bond funds as per the MOU. Then the Commission 
can approve the MOU. 

Recommendation: 



I recommend approval of this MOU. 



Summary of Proposed Formulas 



Admin. Code 
Requirement 
for Art 
Enrichment: 


Total Gross Estimated 
Construction Costs 


2% 








MOU 
Proposal 


First $100 million 


2% 




Next $100 million (up to 
$200 million total) 


1.75% 




Next $800 million (up to 
$1 billion) 


1.50% 




Costs in excess of $1 
billion 


1% 



Example of Impact of Proposed Formulas on Construction Projects 



T-2 Comparison of Art 
Enrichment Funding 
Formulas 




Flat 2% of Construction 
Cost Funding 










Construction Cost: 


AE @ flat 2 % 


Maintenance 
@ 5%, if 
funding source 
eligible 


Annual 
Maintenance 
allocation if 
principle paid 
out over 1 yrs. 


2% 


$220,000,000 


$4,400,000 


$176,000 


$17,600 















MOU Proposal 
w/sliding scale 












Total AE 


Airport 
proposed 
maintenance 
budget for FY 
08/09 from 
operating costs 


Projected cost 
of maintenance 
over 10 yrs. at 
rate of 

$150,000 per 
annum 


2% 


$100,000,000 


$2,000,000 






1.75% 


$100,000,000 


$1,750,000 






1.50% 


$20,000,000 


$300,000 






1% 










Total 
Construction 


$220,000,000 


$4,050,000 


$150,000 


$1,500,000 


Difference 
between flat 
2% and MOU 
proposal in 
calculating AE 


$0 


$350,000 







Example Calculation for 
$500 Million 
Construction Project 




Flat 2% of Construction 
Cost Funding 










Construction Cost: 


AE @ flat 2 % 


Maintienance 
@ 5%, if 
funding source 
eligible 


Annual 
Maintenance 
allocation if 
paid out over 
10 yrs. 




$500,000,000 


$10,000,000 


$400,000 


$40,000 
annually 














MOU Proposal 
Porposal w/sliding 
scale 












Total AE 


Airport 
proposed 
maintenance 
budget for FY 
08/09 from 
operating costs 


Projected cost 
of maintenance 
over 10 yrs. at 
rate of 

$150,000 per 
annum 


2% 


$100,000,000 


$2,000,000 






1.75% 


$100,000,000 


$1,750,000 






1.50% 


$300,000,000 


$4,500,000 






1% 










Total 
Construction 


$500,000,000 


$8,250,000 


$150,000 


$1,500,000 


Difference 
between flat 
2% and MOU 
proposal in 
calculating AE 


$0 


$1,750,000 







Breakdown of 








$150,000 






Estimated 


annual 




Facilities fund 


funding to Arts 


maintenance 


Routine maintenance; 


for changing 


Commission 


allocation for 


performed by Airport 


light bulbs, 


from operating 


FY 07/08 & 


staff; charged at rate of 


minor repairs, 


budget for 


08/09 


one FTE: 


etc. 


conservation 




$70,000 


$50,000 


$30,000 



MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN 

THE AIRPORT COMMISSION AND 

THE ARTS COMMISSION OF 

THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

This MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (this "MOU") dated May 1, 2008, 
constitutes a mutual agreement between the AIRPORT COMMISSION and the ARTS 
COMMISSION of the City and County of San Francisco (the "City"), for the purposes of 
defining the working relationship and responsibilities of each department. 

Background 

In accordance with Section 4.1 15 of the City Charter, the Airport Commission has 
charge of the construction, management, supervision, maintenance, extension, operation, use and 
control of all property and assets located at the San Francisco International Airport (the 
"Airport"), including the exclusive authority to plan and issue revenue bonds for airport-related 
purposes, subject to Board of Supervisors approval. 

In accordance with Section 5.103 of the City Charter, the Arts Commission is required, 
among other things, to approve the designs for all public structures; to approve the design and 
location of all works of art before they are acquired, transferred or sold by the City, or are placed 
upon or removed from City property; to maintain and keep an inventory of works of art owned by 
the City; and to maintain the works of art owned by the City. 

In connection with the Airport Commission's Near Term Master Plan (the "NTMP"), the 
Airport and Arts Commissions previously entered into a Memorandum of Understanding dated 
1995 (the "Prior MOU") to define their respective responsibilities in connection with the NTMP. 
After completion of the NTMP and several years without significant new construction projects at 
the Airport, the Airport Commission is now preparing to undertake several new large capital 
projects as part of its Domestic Terminal Redevelopment Plan and updated five-year capital plan, 
all of which will require coordination and cooperation between the Airport and Arts 
Commissions. Accordingly, this MOU is intended to supersede the Prior MOU. 

This MOU is made in recognition of the requirements of the Federal Aviation 
Administration's ("FAA") Final Policy and Procedures Concerning the Use of Airport Revenue 
(the "Revenue Diversion Policy") and the 1981 Settlement Agreement between the City, the 
Airport Commission and the major airlines serving the Airport. 

In recognition of the foregoing, the Airport and Arts Commissions have agreed to the 
following provisions relative to the acquisition and maintenance of works of art for the Airport. 

I. General Administrative Procedures 

Both the Arts Commission and the Airport Commission agree to follow the procedures 
below: 

A. Application of the Agreement 

The application of the Agreement shall be for Art Enrichment and Maintenance 
Expenses from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2017. 

B. Commitment to Maintain the Airport Art Collection 



The Airport Commission will maintain the art collection at the Airport as 
provided in Section V.A., including entering into a separate memorandum of 
understanding with the Arts Commission for direct charges for the annual 
maintenance costs described in Section V.A.4. The Airport Commission will 
also fund the salary and fringe benefits of an Assistant Museum Registrar located 
at the Airport to assist, among other things, in supervising and performing the 
maintenance of the art collection. The maintenance and compensation costs 
described in this Section are hereinafter referred to as "Maintenance Expenses". 

C. Maintenance Endowment 

In accordance with the Section 3.19 of the Administrative Code, 5% of the art 
enrichment allocation of Capital Improvement Projects may be used for 
maintenance where the funding source allows, and may furthermore be placed in 
an interest bearing account. To that end, during the NTMP, the Airport 
established a fund referred to herein as the "Airport Art Endowment Fund" from 
eligible art enrichment funds generated by taxable NTMP Airport revenue bonds, 
and annually makes available the interest earned from that Fund to the Arts 
Commission for the purposes of maintaining the Airport Art Collection. 

D. Art Enrichment Funds 

1. Calculation of Contributions : In accordance with Section 3. 19 of the 

Administrative Code, funds for art enrichment will be calculated on a 
project by project basis, at a declining percentage of the total gross 
estimated (not final) construction costs (as estimated at the completion of 
construction documents and application for Phase III approval from the 
Arts Commission Civic Design Review Committee) of each eligible 
capital improvement project (a "Project") based on the following tiers: 



Total Gross Estimated Construction Costs of 
Each Eligible Capital Improvement Proiect 


Art Enrichment 
Percentage 


First $100 million of costs 


2.00% 


Next $100 million of costs (up to $200 million 
total) 


1.75% 


Next $800 million of costs (up to $1 billion total) 


1.50% 


Costs in excess of $1 billion 


1.00% 



Example of Calculation: as an illustration, the art enrichment 
contribution for a hypothetical eligible capital improvement project with 
estimated gross construction costs of $500 million would be equal to 
$8,250,000, calculated as follows: 

Total Gross Estimated Construction Costs of Art 

Hypothetical $500 Million Proiect Enrichment Funds 

2.00% of first $ 1 00 million of costs $2,000,000 

1.75% of next $100 million of costs 1,750,000 

1.50% of next $300 million of costs 4,500,000 

Project Total $8,250,000 



2. Art Enrichment Survey Form : Prior to being scheduled for Civic Design 

Review at the Arts Commission, the Airport shall submit a completed 
Art Enrichment Survey form and make contact with the Public Art Staff 
regarding each Project. 

II. Accounting Procedures 

A. Direct Charge Account 

Upon appropriation and availability of bond proceeds for each eligible Project, 
the Airport Commission will set up a direct charge account for the art enrichment 
funds relating to such Project. The Arts Commission will approve and pay all art 
enrichment related costs (other than maintenance) out of this account. 

B. Annual Memorandum of Understanding 

The Airport Commission will enter into a separate memorandum of 
understanding with the Art Commission for direct charges for the annual 
maintenance costs (per Section V.A. hereof). 

C. Separate Accounting for Bond and Operating Funds 

The Arts Commission will maintain separate accounting of the use of the 
following Airport funds: 

1. Art Enrichment (Bond Funds) : Funds comprising the Art Enrichment 
contribution provided from bond proceeds or other Airport sources in 
accordance with Administrative Code provisions and the agreed-upon 
percentages of the estimated construction costs of eligible Projects set 
forth above. Bond proceeds may be used in accordance with Section 
3.19 of the Administrative Code only for art acquisition costs that are 
properly chargeable to the capital account of the facilities for accounting 
purposes and not for maintenance or operating costs. 

2. Maintenance (Operating Funds) : Funds provided by the Airport from 
operating funds allocated through an annual budget request submitted by 
the Arts Commission to the Airport through the Airport Staff Liaison by 
October 1 of each fiscal year shall be used for maintenance, 
conservation, relocation and removal of artwork, including Airport and 
Arts Commission staff time associated with coordinating, overseeing 
and/or performing the work. 

3. Maintenance (Endowment Interest Earnings) : Interest earned from the 
Airport Art Endowment Fund each fiscal year shall be deposited into a 
direct charge account for maintenance of the Airport art collection and 
made available to the Arts Commission at the beginning of the following 
fiscal year (i.e. interest earned in FY 06/07 shall be deposited at the 
beginning of FY 07/08). 

D. Annual Summary of Expenditures 

The Arts Commission will maintain accurate records of all expenditures of 
Airport funds and maintain files with copies of all contract agreements, contract 
payments, purchase orders and other invoices and expenditures which shall be 



provided to the Airport upon request. The Arts Commission shall keep an 
accurate record of which Airport bond proceeds are used for the purchase of each 
work of art. On or before June 30 of each fiscal year, the Arts Commission will 
provide the Airport with an annual summary statement of all such expenditures. 

E. Jurisdiction; Use of Funds from the Sale of Artwork 

In accordance with Sections 4.1 15 and 5.103 of the City Charter and the FAA's 
Revenue Diversion Policy, all art acquisitions using Airport funds are properties 
of the City under joint jurisdiction of the Airport and Arts Commissions. All 
proceeds from any sale or auction of artwork at the Airport shall be distributed as 
follows: 

1 . If the artwork was acquired with the proceeds of tax-exempt Airport 
revenue bonds and (a) such bonds are still outstanding on the sale date, (b) such 
bonds have been refunded and the refunding bonds are still outstanding, or (b) 
the Airport and Arts Commissions cannot determine whether such bonds are still 
outstanding, then an amount equal to the original purchase price of the artwork 
shall be deposited into a direct charge account and used to purchase artwork at 
the Airport per Sections II. A. and II.C.l. above. If the bonds are no longer 
outstanding or were taxable bonds, no deposit is necessary under this paragraph. 

2. Any payment due the artist under the California Resale Royalties Act 
shall be paid to the artist. 

3. Any remaining amount shall be credited to the Airport Art Endowment 
Fund and expended per Section II.C.3. above. 

F. Annual Inventory 

On or before June 30 of each fiscal year, the Arts Commission will provide the 
Airport with an inventory of all art objects acquired by the Art Commission for 
the Airport. This inventory shall represent a part of the Airport's fixed assets 
inventory list. Likewise, the Arts Commission will provide the Airport with 
documentation related to any artwork that the Arts Commission has de- 
accessioned. 

III. Coordination, Cooperation, and Communication 

The Airport and Arts Commissions will continue to work together in the spirit of mutual 
cooperation to acquire outstanding artworks for the Airport and to ensure the 
coordination of efforts to maintain and conserve the collection. The Staff Liaisons and 
the Airport Art Steering Committee facilitate continued good communication and 
coordination for the art enrichment program. 

A. Staff Liaisons 

1 . Airport Staff Liaison : The Airport Director shall appoint an Airport 
Staff Liaison to facilitate communication between staff of the Airport 
and Arts Commissions and to help facilitate the Arts Commission's work 
at the Airport. 

2. Arts Commission Staff Liaison : The Public Art Director shall appoint 
the Arts Commission staff liaison and project manager for the Airport. 



B. Airport Art Steering Committee (AASC) 

1. Composition: 

The Airport Art Steering Committee will be composed of six to eight members: 
half of the representatives appointed by the Airport Commission and half 
appointed by the Arts Commission. 

2. Purpose, Goals and Objectives 

a. Purpose: The purpose of the Airport Art Steering Committee is 
to develop policy and make recommendations for the Art Enrichment 
Program at the Airport. The scope of the committee's purview includes 
both the existing collection and new art enrichment projects. Steering 
Committee recommendations for the purchase or commissioning of new 
artwork shall be approved by the Arts and Airport Commissions as 
outlined in this agreement. 

b. Goals : To promote an art enrichment program for the airport 
that meets the following criteria: 

• Results in an art program/collection of the highest aesthetic standards 

• Provides enjoyment for the Airport visitor. 

• Functions within the Airport's operational requirements 

• Enhances the national and international prestige of the Airport and 
the City. 

c. Objectives: 

i. To develop, review and revise as necessary policy and 

program procedure guidelines relative to the permanent 
art collection at the Airport. 

ii. To oversee the execution of the art acquisition 

component of the Airport Commission's Domestic 
Terminal Redevelopment Plan and applicable five-year 
capital plans, and to assist in updating such plans or 
undertake the creation of a new art master plan as 
necessary: 

• To review and approve planning objectives. 

• To review drafts of art master planning documents 
and comment as necessary. 

• To present and support adoption of all of the above 
to the Airport and Art Commissions. 

iii. To oversee the commissioning of new artworks: 

• To review and approve recommended locations for 
artwork installations. 

• To review and approve project guidelines and 
budget. 



j 






• Review selection panel recommendations and 
recommend approval to respective commissions. 

• Review and approve artist proposals. 

• To promote and support Committee 
recommendations to Arts and Airport Commissions. 

iv. To provide ongoing stewardship of the Airport 

collection, including but not limited to: 

• Ongoing evaluation of the collection. 

• Review and approval of recommendations regarding works to be 
de-accessioned and/or re-sited. 

d. AASC Meeting Agenda and Minutes : The Arts Commission will 
provide the Airport Commission Secretary with copies of all AASC 
meeting agendas and minutes. 

IV. Selection/Commissioning and De-accessioning of Artwork 

A. Artist/Artwork Selection 

The selection of artists and/or artwork will be carried out in accordance with the 
Art Commission's Policies and Guidelines for the Civic Art Collection. 

B. Artist Selection Panel Representation 

In accordance with the Arts Commission's guidelines, the Arts Commission shall 
appoint all guest members of artist selection panels. Selection panels for Airport 
projects shall be comprised of the following voting members: 

• 1 member representing -the Airport from the Airport Art Steering 
Committee. 

• 1 member representing the Arts Commission. 

• Up to 3 guest arts professionals. 

• At the discretion of the Arts Commission, 1 member of the project 
architectural team may be appointed. 

C. Review and Approval of Selected Artists, Art Proposals, Direct Art 
Purchases, and Locations for Artwork 

1. Artist Selection 

Artists recommended by Selection Panels for design contracts will be 
submitted to the Arts Commission for approval. 

2. Artists' Project Proposals 

Artists' project proposals will be reviewed and approved by the AASC 
prior to being submitted to the Arts Commissions for similar approval. 
At the completion of design development, proposals will be submitted to 
the Airport Commission for final approval prior to the Arts Commission 
commissioning fabrication of the artwork. 

3. Approval of Direct Purchase of Artwork 



All artwork proposed for acquisition through direct purchase for the 
Airport will be reviewed and approved by the AASC prior to being 
submitted to the Airport and Arts Commissions for approval. 

4. Proposed Gifts 

a. Proposed gifts of artwork to the Airport will be considered in 
accordance with the Arts Commissions' Gift Policy, incorporated in 
its Policies and Guidelines for the Civic Art Collection. In 
accordance with those policies, these special conditions shall apply 
for gifts of art proposed for the Airport: 

• The proposed artwork should be within the focus of the Airport's 
collection, which is defined as a collection of contemporary fine 
art (1960 to present) by artists of recognized reputation. The 
collection emphasis is on the representation of Bay Area artists. 

• Priorities for acquisition, as defined in the Assessment and 
Recommendations Report (1995) prepared by Katherine Holland 
and Karen Tsujimoto (or any updated or subsequent assessment 
evaluation approved by the AASC and the Arts Commission) 
shall apply when considering the acceptance of gifts for the 
collection at the Airport. 

• Special care shall be given to determining whether or not there is 
an appropriate site for installation of the artwork and whether or 
not the artwork can be maintained within the Airport 
environment and within available resources. 

b. The AASC will review all proposals for gifts of art to be sited at the 
Airport and make a recommendation to either accept or decline the 
gift to the Visual Arts Committee of the Arts Commission. If the 
Visual Arts Committee recommends acceptance of the gift, the 
proposal will be submitted to the Airport Commission for approval 
prior to the item being submitted to the full Arts Commission for 
acceptance by Resolution. 

5. Site Approval 

Proposed sites for new acquisitions shall be submitted to the AASC, the 
Arts Commission, and the Airport's Design Review Committee for 
approval. 

6. Final Acceptance 

The Arts Commission will review and approve completed and/or 
installed art prior to final acceptance of the artwork into the City's Civic 
Art Collection. 

D. Removal, Relocation and/or De-accessioning of Artwork 

1. Airport Remodeling or Operational Changes Requiring Relocation 

or Storage of Artwork. 









Airport employees involved in planning or design shall initiate early 
contact with the Airport Staff Liaison to ensure proper coordination with 
the Arts Commission for the removal and relocation of artwork. 
Proposed remodeling that will require the removal of major artworks, 
impair the visibility of the artwork, or otherwise affect the relationship of 
the artwork to the site, will first be submitted to the AASC for review 
and recommendation prior to being submitted to the Arts Commission 
for approval. The Arts Commission will make a good faith effort to 
respond to a request by the Airport to relocate artwork in a timely 
manner. 

Most relocation and/or storage of artwork necessitated by Airport 
remodeling will be handled on an Airport/ Arts Commission staff level, 
and executed by the Airport Museums staff as part of routine 
maintenance. 

2. Permanent Removal, Alteration, Destruction and/or De-accessioning 
of Artwork 

Permanent removal, alteration, destruction or de-accessioning of artwork 
will be reviewed and approved by the AASC, prior to submission to the 
Arts Commission in accordance with Section 7, Removal, Alteration, 
Destruction and De-accessioning Policies and Procedures of the Arts 
Commission's Policies and Guidelines for the Civic Art Collection, and 
in accordance with the relevant sections of the City Charter, 
Administrative Code, and state and federal law. 

3. Approval of Sites for Relocated Artwork 

The Arts Commission shall submit proposed relocation sites for 
displaced artwork to the Airport's Design Review Committee prior to 
proceeding with relocation. Relocation of major artwork, where the 
removal or relocation will have a significant impact on either the artwork 
or the new proposed site will also be submitted to the AASC for its 
review and recommendation. 

4. Cost of Art Removal, Relocation and Storage 

The expense of removal, transporting, relocating and/or storing artwork, 
or any other related expenses, including Arts Commission administrative 
costs incurred as a result of Airport remodeling that necessitates the 
removal of artwork, will be borne by the Airport and will be incorporated 
in the Airport's Capital Plan. The Arts Commission shall submit to the 
Airport a written request with copies of documentation detailing the costs 
to be reimbursed. 

V. Maintenance 

A. Types of Maintenance 

There are three major types of maintenance needs for the art collection at the 
Airport: 

1. Repair, Replacement, or Improvement of Artwork's Installation: 

This includes repair or replacement of cases, framing, installation barriers, etc. 



These improvements will be made by Airport staff and funded through the 
Airport's facilities maintenance budget. The Airport staff will get the approval of 
the Arts Commission prior to making any repairs or replacements of cases, 
framing or installation that changes or differs from the original. 

2. Routine Maintenance: This includes dusting of artwork and Plexiglas 
cases, (including overhead artwork requiring the use of a mechanical lift to 
reach), cleaning glass barriers and the floor behind the barriers, changing light 
bulbs, and other tasks that require appropriate education, experience and/or 
technical skill, but do not require the services of a fine art conservator, the 
original artist, or the specialized service of another outside contractor. This work 
will be managed and preformed by Airport staff and funded through the Airport's 
facilities maintenance and operating budget. The Airport Commission will 
ensure that all personnel performing maintenance on the Artwork are qualified 
for the level of work being performed. 

3. Storage: This includes long- and short-term storage for artworks 
removed from display due to Airport remodeling or other reasons. The Airport 
will provide storage for artworks in its collection without charge to the Arts 
Commission. 

4. Major Cleaning, Repair or Conservation: This is work requiring 
specialized equipment and/or expertise; professional inspection of artwork to 
determine when maintenance or conservation is necessary or work requiring 
contact with the artist. This work will be managed by the Arts Commission and 
will be included in an annual budget request to be submitted by the Arts ' 
Commission to the Airport through the Airport Staff Liaison by October 1 of 
each fiscal year. A separate memorandum of understanding for the work order 
will executed for each fiscal year. 

B. Maintenance Responsibilities and Procedures 

1. Maintenance Plan, Inspection and Reporting: The Arts Commission 
will conduct a formal inspection of the collection on an annual basis. The report 
from this inspection will identify ongoing maintenance needs as well as 
maintenance and conservation projects. The Arts Commission and Airport staff 
will develop an annual maintenance plan that will be the basis for the annual 
budget request submitted to the Airport Commission through the Airport Staff 
Liaison by October 1 of each fiscal year. 

2. Daily Maintenance: Airport staff will oversee the daily maintenance of 
the Collection and will follow through with the maintenance as provided in 
Sections V.A.I and 2 above. Any larger problem with the Artwork will be 
brought to the Art Commission's attention as soon as it is identified, in order to 
be addressed as provided in Section V.A.4 above. 

3. Records: All pertinent records, artist files, condition reports, 
maintenance records and conservation reports will be kept by the Arts 
Commission. Copies of these documents will be provided to the Airport 
Commission upon request. 



4. Vendor Contracts: The Airport and Arts Commission will contract 
directly with vendors for repair, replacement, cleaning, maintenance or 
improvement of artwork as-needed. 

5. Notification: 

a. The Arts Commission will notify the Airport Staff Liaison, 
Airport Duty Manager and, in the case where work is scheduled 
as part of Airport construction, the Project Manager, in advance 
of scheduling any site work such as installation, removal, 
relocation and/or maintenance of art. 

b. The Airport Staff Liaison will assist the Arts Commission as 
needed in notifying the necessary department(s) or personnel at 
the Airport of any work scheduled by the Arts Commission. 

c. The Airport Staff Liaison is responsible for notifying the Arts 
Commission of any damage, problems, missing plaques, etc. 
associated with the Airport collection. 



10 



IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Airport Commission and the Arts Commission have each 
caused this Memorandum of Understanding to be executed by their duly authorized 
representatives as of the dates set forth below. 



Date 



John L. Martin 
Airport Director 



Date 



Luis Cancel 

Director of Cultural Affairs 



11 



sfac: May 2 1 , 2008 Page 1 of 1 1 



San Francisco Arts Commission 

TEXT ONLY: 

m 

PRINT: 
TEXT SIZE: 

n 

[3 

May 21, 2008 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, May 21, 2008 

3:00 p.m. 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 

Minutes DOCUMENTS DEPT 

Commissioners Present: JUN ~ 2 2008 

Jeannene Przyblyski, Leonard Hunter, Dede Wilsey 

Absent: Larry Rinder, Pop Zhao SAN f-RANCISCO 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Staff Present: 

Luis Cancel, Mary Chou, Allison Cummings, Carol Marie Daniels, Marcus Davies, Jill Manton, Judy Moran, 
Susan Pontious, Ellen Shershow 

Note: All votes are unanimous unless recorded otherwise. 

The meeting commenced at 3:05 p.m. 



Consent 

1. Motion to approve an exhibition organized by San Francisco General Hospital's Cancer 
Awareness, Resources and Education (CARE) Program of portraits by photographer Nicole Franco 
in the cafeteria of San Francisco General Hospital. 

2. Motion to accept into the Civic Art Collection the Harvey Milk commemorative bronze sculpture 
and base (2008), a gift to the city from the Harvey Milk City Hall Memorial Committee. The 
sculpture, designed by Daub, Firmin, Hendrickson Sculpture Group, is located in the Supervisors' 
Ceremonial Rotunda at City Hall. 

3. Motion to approve a mural by artist Norm Stien with assistance from artists Victor Reyes and 
Amanda Lynn, to be installed for a period not to exceed six months, on the outer perimeter wall ol 
the skate park as part of the improvements at Potrero del Sol and Rolph Playgrounds, pending 
approval from the Recreation and Park Commission on June 5, 2008. 

4. Motion to approve a series of high-resolution chalk stencils of historical photographs on the 
sidewalks outside of 15 major theatres and art museums throughout the civic center and 
downtown San Francisco by artists Jessica Tully and Kim Munson, as part of Yerba Buena Center 



http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=81816 5/30/2008 



sfac: May 2 1 , 2008 Page 2 of 1 1 



for the Arts' visual arts exhibition Bay Area Now 5. This will involve a two-step process: four 
temporary spray chalk designs installed in four locations during the week of June 9, followed by a 
second series commencing July 11 and continuing through October 19, 2008 in all 15 locations. 

5. Motion to approve an increase in the current total contract budget amount of $35,000 by $750 
for additional required engineering costs for artist Scott Donahue's Contract Number 
POAR004000098 to design, fabricate and install an artwork for the renovated Richmond Branch 
Library for a new total contract budget amount of $35,750. 

Motion: Motion to adopt the consent calendar items. 
Moved: Wilsey/Hunter 

2. Gallery - 155 Grove Street installations 

Gallery Director Meg Shiffler presented the next 155 Grove Street exhibition, which was curated 
by Gallery Manager Dana Hemenway. Artist Paul Hayes uses pieces of paper to create large 
suspended works that are fluid and natural. His work is appropriate for a temporary installation 
and this particular work at Grove Street is unique because people can only view the work from a 
fixed perspective outside the gallery space, whereas his work is usually suspended up high and 
seen by viewers from below. For the Grove Street installation, the artist will play with the whole 
height of the building from the floor to the ceiling. Ms. Shiffler reported that the installation is 
currently in progress and should be completed by May 30, 2008. 

Motion: Motion to approve an honorarium in the amount of $500 for artist Paul Hayes for his 
installation at 155 Grove Street, to be installed May 30, 2008. 
Moved: Wilsey/Hunter 

3. Gallery - Bill Fontana at City Hall 

Ms. Shiffler reported that the upcoming Bill Fontana exhibition at City Hall is progressing nicely. 
She submitted to Commissioners a preliminary press release of the installation, entitled Spiraling 
Echoes, and a budget. Ms. Shiffler stated that the Arts Commission is ready to enter into contract 
with Mr. Fontana and she reviewed the budget for the project. The amount of secured funds totals 
$55,000, with $30,000 from the SFAC Gallery and $25,000 from the National Endowment of the 
Arts. Expenditures for the project total $98,400 and the Arts Commission needs to raise the 
remaining $43,400. Ms. Shiffler will work with Development Director Rachelle Axel to apply for 
additional support from Adobe, Fleishhacker and the San Francisco Foundation. In addition, Ms. 
Shiffler reported that Director of Cultural Affairs Luis Cancel plans to approach high-tech movie 
and sound companies for funding. Ms. Shiffler explained that if the total remaining amount cannot 
be raised, there is a scaled-back plan, which she would rather not use. The contract amount is for 
$68,000 with a contingency of $9,000. The sound equipment will be owned by the Arts 
Commission, but purchased by Mr. Fontana because it is highly specialized equipment that he can 
purchase at a good rate from companies he has worked with in the past. 

Ms. Shiffler reported that Mr. Fontana conducted a sound test two days before this meeting in City 
Hall with attendees from the Arts Commission, the City Hall Preservation Advisory Commission 
and the Mayor's Office of Disability. Susan Mizner, Director of the Mayor's Office of Disability, 
stated that while the sound installation will be disorienting for some, it will be delightful for most 
who experience the work. Ms. Shiffler reported that Ms. Mizner was thrilled about the project. Ms. 
Shiffler will also be presenting the works to the City Hall Preservation Advisory Commission for 
their support in June. The next sound test in City Hall will be scheduled for the fall of 2008 and 
Commissioners and the Mayor's staff will be invited. 

Commissioner Wilsey recommended that Ms. Shiffler bring this project to Supervisor Michela 



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Alioto-Pier for her support. Ms. Shiffler thanked Commissioner Wilsey for her suggestion and 
reported that she will also present the project to Belinda Lyons, Executive Director of the Mental 
Health Association of San Francisco. 

Commissioner Hunter inquired about how the Arts Commission would use the equipment after the 
installation at City Hall. Ms. Shiffler stated that as the equipment is part of the artwork, it is 
important to keep it in case the Arts Commission wants to display the work at a different location. 
She explained there might be the possibility of using parts of the equipment for uses other than 
the display of the artwork, such as in the gallery for other installations that have an aural 
component. The equipment consists of a basic sound board and transmitters that emit ultrasonic 
bands of sound. 

Commissioner Hunter stated that the Arts Commission would probably have to ask Mr. Fontana 
permission for using the equipment for purposes other than exhibiting his work. Ms. Shiffler 
concurred. 

Motion: Motion for the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into a contract with Bill Fontana for the 
creation, installation and de-installation of a temporary sound art installation at City Hall 
scheduled to open in late January 2009. The contract amount shall not exceed $68,000. 
Moved: Wilsey/Hunter 

Patricia's Green - Temporary Sculpture Proposal 

Public Art Program Director Jill Manton reported on the possibility of a temporary exhibition of 
Tony Labat's Peace Sign sculpture in the Hayes Valley Patricia's Green. Ms. Manton stated that the 
sculpture was first proposed several years ago as a gift to the City from former Arts Commission 
President Stanlee Gatti to be permanently installed in the Panhandle. This project was ultimately 
not approved. Ms. Manton proposed a temporary six-month exhibition of the sculpture on 
Patricia's Green and stated that the installation of the work prior to the presidential election would 
be particularly poignant. Ms. Manton has received support for this project from the Hayes Valley 
Art Coalition. She plans to present the project to the Hayes Valley Neighborhood Association and 
anticipates their support for the project. She will then present the work at a Recreation and Park 
Commission hearing in June, which is part of the permit approval process. Ms. Manton then 
introduced artist Tony Labat. 

Mr. Labat stated that the timing of this installation is particularly significant not only because 2006 
is the fiftieth anniversary of the peace sign, but also because of the election in November. Mr. 
Labat explained that this sculpture reflects his longtime interest in the power of signs and symbols 
and their relationship to history. He reported that when the sculpture was originally proposed for 
permanent installation in 1997, there was too much emphasis on hippies and the Summer of Love 
and not enough talk about the nuclear disarmament movement and the origins of the peace sign. 
Now, with the fiftieth anniversary of the peace sign, and current U.S. government talks with North 
Korea and Iran, the peace sign will function more as a global symbol. Mr. Labat said that the site 
of Patricia's Green is beautiful and perfect for this work. 

Ms. Manton reported that while funding for this project has been approved, the budget is still in 
the process of being finalized. The final figure will be determined by the placement of the artwork 
on either the lawn or the concrete. Ms. Manton is in discussion with the City Attorney's office 
about completing a loan agreement with an artist's honorarium instead of the standard contract 
used for commissioning permanent artworks. 

Commissioner Przyblyski expressed her hopes to have a community-based event surrounding the 
installation of the Peace Sign sculpture. 



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Motion: Motion to approve the temporary display of the Peace Sign sculpture by Tony Labat from 
October 15, 2008 to June 15, 2009 in Patricia's Green pending the availability of funds from the 
PUC art enrichment reserve, support for the project from the Hayes Valley Neighborhood 
Association, and permit approval from the Recreation and Park Department. 
Moved: Hunter/Wilsey 

5. Civic Center Plaza - Temporary Sculpture Proposal 

Ms. Manton reported on the possibility of installing an artwork utilizing recycled tree branches by 
artist Patrick Dougherty in Civic Center Plaza during the winter of 2009. The work would be 
installed on top of the existing trees on the plaza during the winter when the branches are bare. 
Ms. Manton reported that Mr. Dougherty usually works with a support staff who set up equipment 
such as scaffolding and lifts, and who assist with the installation. Ms. Manton is currently looking 
for local partners and inquired about the possibility of recruiting art students from local 
universities to provide assistance. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that she has a recommendation for a student who just graduated 
from the San Francisco Art Institute who is not only well-suited to assist Mr. Dougherty, but also 
excited about the project. 

Ms. Manton suggested a symposium or panel about the topic of art and landscape to accompany 
this temporary installation. Commissioner Przyblyski said there was a possibility for collaboration 
on this project between the California College of the Arts, the San Francisco Art Institute, and San 
Francisco State University. 

Ms. Manton stated that one of the next steps after Mr. Dougherty provides the Arts Commission 
with his site specific proposal is to obtain the approval of the Recreation and Park Department for 
the installation. 

Motion: Motion to award the artist Patrick Dougherty an honorarium of $750 to develop a site 
specific proposal for the Civic Center Plaza to be implemented in winter of 2009. 
Moved: Wilsey/Hunter 

6. Sunnyside Conservatory 

Project Manager Judy Moran reported that of the three proposals submitted for the Sunnyside 
Conservatory, the selection panel chose the artist team Wowhaus for the implementation of an 
artwork at the Conservatory. Ms. Moran stated that several of the Friends of the Sunnyside 
Conservatory also attended the selection panel meeting and spoke most favorably about the 
Wowhaus proposal. The Wowhaus proposal includes a menagerie of small bronze imaginary 
creatures, installed in the concrete along the garden pathways. The Friends spoke in favor of the 
proposal because it was the least obtrusive and most compatible within the landscape; they also 
enjoyed its subtlety and playfulness. Ms. Moran reported that the selection panel thought the 
Wowhaus proposal was the most appropriate for the site but requested that the artists reduce the 
number of works and create larger pieces that are unique, not duplicates. They suggested that 
the larger creatures be less static in pose and more dynamic, and the smaller creatures be 
clustered to create more of a presence. Ms. Moran stated that the selected artist will work with 
the project's landscape architects to place the sculptures throughout the park. She also explained 
that she had a conservator review the materials proposed by each of the artists. 

Commissioner Wilsey expressed concern that the public may trip over the sculptures. Ms. Moran 
stated that the sculptures will be placed with attention to the way people walk through the space. 



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Commissioner Przyblyski requested clarification of whether the selection panel wanted fewer 
figures, or if they wanted larger, more unique figures, in which case the number would decrease 
because of the cost of casting. Ms. Moran explained that the panel seemed most interested in 
having each figure be unique. The limitation is the cost of creating the molds for each unique 
figure. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that the possibility of having two of the same figures may not be 
so bad. She believes that there needs to be enough of these figures to have a presence in the 
garden; to create the effect of a fairy tale that continues throughout the landscape. If there were 
only one or two of the larger sculptures, then the works might feel arbitrary. She would prefer not 
to sacrifice numbers for individuality. Commissioner Wilsey agreed that there needed to be 
enough figures to create a sense of narrative in the park. 

Motion: Motion to approve the artist team Wowhaus for their proposal for the Sunnyside 
Conservatory, as recommended by the Sunnyside Conservatory Artist Selection Committee. 
Moved: Hunter/Wilsey 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with the artist 
team Wowhaus for the final design, fabrication, and transportation of an artwork for the 
Sunnyside Conservatory for an amount not to exceed $50,000. 
Moved: Wilsey/Hunter 

Sava Pool 

Ms. Moran presented the final design of artist Catherine Wagner's artwork consisting of 27 
porcelain enamel panels for permanent installation at the Larsen Park Sava Pool Natatorium. The 
images are unique photographs taken by the artist of the waves created by swimmers in a pool. 
Two of the photographs also include an image of the beloved lifeguard Charlie Sava in the design. 
Commissioners stated that the design looked beautiful and the work was very successful. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final design by artist Catherine Wagner of porcelain enamel panels 
for permanent installation at the Larsen Park Sava Pool Natatorium and authorization for the artist 
to proceed to fabrication of the artwork. 
Moved: Hunter/Wilsey 

Franklin Square 

Public Art Program Deputy Director Susan Pontious reported on the use of art enrichment funds 
generated by the renovation of Franklin Square Park for the engineering fees associated with the 
design of a support wall for Anthony Stellon's mosaic mural, Brotherhood of Man. This mural was 
removed from the Martin Luther King pool in 1998, and former Civic Art Collection Program 
Director Debra Lehane saved the mural from destruction. Ms. Lehane contracted for preliminary 
engineering to reinstall the work but it was too costly and the mural has been stored in Franklin 
Square since then. Ms. Pontious is in conversation with members of the community about 
installing the work in Franklin Square, which has just been renovated. Art enrichment has 
generated $28,000, which should cover the design and engineering of the new wall for the mural. 
Ms. Pontious believes the additional costs of installing the work could be covered by private funds. 
The mural was a gift of Mayor Alioto to the City and Supervisor Alioto-Pier is very interested in 
having the work reinstalled. Ms. Pontious introduced a member of the Friends of Franklin Square. 

Kate Sofis, on behalf of the Friends of Franklin Square, reported that the Friends are eager to 
have artwork in the park and they believe that art should be a key component of the park. The 
community surrounding Franklin Square is a melting pot and the Brotherhood of Man symbolizes 
the feeling of unity and diversity in the neighborhood. Ms. Sofis stated that there is a lot of 



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motivation to match the art enrichment funds with private funds. The only concern of the Friends 
is to create a design that prevents people from hiding behind the wall on which the mural is 
installed. 

Commissioner Hunter praised the work for its beauty and exceptional quality. Ms. Pontious 
explained that the artist also designed the seal for the City of San Francisco. 

Ms. Gonchar stated that the proposal for the mural to be placed in Franklin Square should be 
reviewed by Supervisor Alioto-Pier. 

Ms. Manton stated that other sites for the mural were considered, including the parking garage 
building at Civic Center Plaza, but there was no appropriate wall for the work to be placed. 
Commissioner Przyblyski supported the placement of the artwork at Franklin Square as it seemed 
like an appropriate location and it has the support of the community. 

Motion: Motion to approve use of $28,000 art enrichment funds generated by the renovation of 
Franklin Square Park for architectural and engineering fees to design a support wall for Anthony 
Stellon's mosaic mural, Brotherhood of Man. 
Moved: Hunter/Wilsey 

9. San Francisco International Airport 

Ms. Pontious reported on the Memorandum of Understanding ("MOU") between the Airport and 
the Arts Commission, which has been under negotiation for a year. Ms. Pontious worked with Ms. 
Manton, Mr. Cancel, Airport Director John Martin, and Director of San Francisco Airport Museums 
Blake Summers on this MOU and believes it's a good arrangement for the Arts Commission. Ms. 
Pontious then explained the terms of the revised MOU: In exchange for the sliding scale for 
calculating art enrichment from capital bond funds, the Airport would assume the annual costs of 
maintaining the collection from its operating budget, and routine maintenance and repairs would 
be performed by the Airport staff and a new Associate Registrar to be hired by the Airport for this 
purpose. Ms. Pontious stated that major repair or conservation will be managed by the Arts 
Commission and paid for by the Airport's operating budget and annual interest from the 
maintenance endowment. The Arts Commission will enter annually into a separate MOU with the 
Airport Commission to determine this amount. 

Commissioner Przyblyski expressed concern about the length of the contract. Ms. Pontious 
explained that she started negotiations with a 5-year contract and a much lower threshold but the 
Airport responded with a higher threshold and a 10-year contract. 

There was also some discussion regarding the gaps between construction costs and the 
percentage for art enrichment. Ms. Pontious explained that the amounts corresponded to budgets 
on projects and that construction costs and the percentage to art enrichment outlined in the MOU 
are based on individual projects. 

Commissioner Przyblyski explained that her major concern regarding the MOU was that the 
contract did not set a minimum threshold or dollar amount for maintenance, other than the 
additional staff position of Associate Registrar, while the reduction in the percentage of art 
enrichment is clearly stipulated. Mr. Cancel concurred that the baseline is not included in the 
contract as a dollar amount. 

Ms. Pontious explained that the Airport is as motivated as the Arts Commission about keeping the 
City's Collection well-maintained. Ms. Pontious suggested using the figure of $150,000 as the 
baseline for maintenance based on the work completed in 2007-2008, adjusted for inflation. This 



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figure includes routine maintenance performed by Airport staff ($70,000), a facilities fund for 
changing light bulbs and minor repairs ($50,000), and funds to the Arts Commission from the 
operating budget for conservation ($30,000). 

Ms. Manton asked if there is an escape clause in the contract so that if the Airport does not upholc 
their part of the MOU, it can be renegotiated. Ms. Pontious responded that such a clause was not 
included in the MOU under review. 

Commissioner Przyblyski recommended that Arts Commission staff strongly consider including a 
dollar amount baseline in the contract and then revisit the motion to accept the MOU at the next 
meeting of the full Commission. Commissioner Wilsey concurred that a minimum dollar amount 
should be included in the MOU, which can then be renegotiated in ten years. 

THIS MOTION HAS BEEN POSTPONED FOR CONSIDERATION BY THE FULL COMMISSION. 
Motion: Motion to approve a Memorandum of Understanding between the Airport and Arts 
Commission, which shall apply to art enrichment and art maintenance expenses between July 1, 
2007 and June 30, 2017, and which outlines the procedures and policies for the selection of art 
for the Airport and collection management responsibilities, art enrichment funding formulas, and 
other issues related to the coordination and cooperation between the Airport and the Arts 
Commission relative to the Public Art Program at the Airport. 

10. Junipero Serra Playground 

Project Manager Tonia Macneil reported on the completion of artwork at Junipero Serra 
Playground by artist Bean Finneran and presented images of the installed artwork. She made note 
that vents on one wall and a light fixture on the other were not indicated on the architectural 
drawings that the artist referenced during the design phase. The vents will be painted flat grey 
when the building is painted. 

THIS MOTION HAS BEEN AMENDED. 

Motion: Motion to approve the completion of two untitled ceramic tile artworks by the artist Bean 
Finneran, installed on the north and south walls of the clubhouse at Junipero Serra Playground. 
Moved: Hunter/Wilsey 

THIS MOTION HAS BEEN AMENDED. 

Motion: Motion to accept into the Civic Art Collection of the City and County of San Francisco two 

untitled ceramic tile artworks by the artist Bean Finneran, installed on the north and south walls 

of the clubhouse at Junipero Serra Playground. 

Moved: Wilsey/Hunter 

11. Gallery - SFAC Gallery exhibition at 401 Van Ness 

Ms. Shiffler presented the next SFAC Gallery exhibition at 401 Van Ness titled Resisting Dominion, 
on view from June 12 to August 16, 2008. The exhibition will feature Tiffany Bozic (Oakland), 
James Drake (Sante Fe), Leiv Fagereng (Portland), Walton Ford (Great Barrington, MA), and Tara 
Tucker (San Francisco). There will be a VIP champagne toast to celebrate the opening because 
the works are being borrowed from galleries and private individuals. 

Ms. Shiffler stated that this exhibition includes work that is meticulously executed, beautiful, and 
timely in terms of political content. She presented two works by artist Walton Ford, who creates 
Audubon-inspired intaglio prints with personifications of animals. Artist Tiffany Bozic, who recently 
had a solo show at the Academy of Sciences, creates exquisite paintings that depict creatures 
from the deep sea. The works are large, up to three feet by four feet, and comment on scientific 
dredging and the relationship of humans to animals. Artist Tara Tucker, who is represented by 



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Rena Bransten, imagines a future where man doesn't exist. While her animals look peaceful, there 
is a dark undertone that reflects people's behavior toward the environment. Artist Leiv Fagereng 
depicts animals at the edge of civilization and grafts parts of animals and people in unnatural 
ways. Mr. Fagereng's work references Dutch seventeenth-century paintings and political 
allegorical narrative. The exhibition will also include a 19-minute long three-channel video by 
artist James Drake, presented with three different projectors. On the left, a banquet table set up 
in western Texas is visited by a pack of feral pigs; in the middle, hummingbirds visit a banquet 
and havalenas (wild pigs) run around in the background; on the right, a python slowly and 
gracefully circles the banquet table and a live chicken lands on the roasted turkey. The Gallery will 
produce an accompanying exhibition catalogue that includes an essay by Meredith Tromble. 

12. Gallery - Fundraising programs 

Ms. Shiffler presented on a new series of fundraising programs spearheaded by the SFAC Gallery 
Advisory Board. The first of these programs, ON YOUR MARK, will take place on Saturday, June 
14, 2008 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at Electric Works Gallery, and will feature a print 
demonstration and talk by emerging artist Ala Ebtekar. Tickets are $100 each and the ticket price 
can be applied to the purchase of a print. Ms. Shiffler plans to do a series of three fundraising 
programs a year, which will have an educational and social component. Paule Anglim has given 
the SFAC Gallery $2,000 to underwrite the event. The next artist under consideration for the 
series is Rosana Castilla for the fall of 2008. 

13. Gallery - Exhibition schedule 

Ms. Shiffler reported on proposed changes in the Gallery's exhibition schedule for the calendar 
year of 2009. Ms. Shiffler reviewed the Gallery's new programming since her arrival, which 
includes one to three educational programs for each exhibition, radio broadcasts with a total of 36 
guests, and an additional series for both the North Light Court Banners and the Decaux kiosk 
posters. She then presented a series of new circumstances in 2008 that include the departure of 
Gallery Manager Dana Hemenway after four years with the SFAC Gallery, the Gallery's central role 
in managing the installation of Bill Fontana's sound sculpture in City Hall, and the increasing 
number of fundraising events. 

Ms. Shiffler presented her proposed changes to the Gallery's schedule, which would include four 
exhibitions instead of five at 401 Van Ness and Grove Street, and three instead of four on the 
ground floor of City Hall. Ms. Shiffler explained that these changes would be more in line with 
available funding. She then suggested increasing the exhibition of North Light Court banners from 
one to two per year if corporate sponsorship can be secured. She also stated that the Gallery will 
produce more lesson events, two to three board events, and will add one part-time employee. Ms. 
Shiffler then asked Mr. Cancel to present two new exhibition programs: a collaborative exhibition 
hosted at the SFAC Gallery with another local arts organization and a sister-city exhibition. 

Mr. Cancel explained that these initiatives take into consideration the SFAC Gallery as a municipal 
gallery and the way in which the Gallery can fulfill the City's objectives. He reported on the 
initiative that includes an artist exchange with San Francisco's sister cities; Cork and Zurich are 
two cities particularly keen on moving forward with this exchange. Mr. Cancel also announced 
plans to mount collaborative exhibitions with neighborhood-based organizations at the SFAC 
Gallery as well as other civic spaces. 

Upon inquiry from Commissioner Przyblyski, Ms. Shiffler stated that the annual exhibition that 
celebrates winners of the Murphy & Cadogan Fellowships in the Fine Arts is one of the four 
exhibitions to be presented at 401 Van Ness. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that her concern over the artist exchange and exhibition program 



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with sister cities is that while much excitement is generated from the trips, there is never any 
funding for exhibitions following the trip. Mr. Cancel stated that his proposed initiatives would 
depend on the financial contributions of local support groups. Mr. Cancel added that if the funding 
is not available, the current exhibition could be extended or the Gallery could consider other 
opportunities. Commissioner Wilsey explained that local support groups are more apt to give 
money to the trips than to local exhibitions. Mr. Cancel stated that an accompanying exhibition 
will have to be determined on a case-by-case basis depending on the artist's practice. 

Commissioner Przyblyski explained that she has had extensive discussions with Ms. Shiffler about 
what it means to be a municipal gallery. While public art usually draws an older demographic, the 
SFAC Gallery reaches a younger, more diverse constituency. Commissioner Przyblyski explained 
that it is very difficult for the Arts Commission to maintain control over programming once it 
opens the space up to be occupied by other organizations. 

Mr. Cancel explained that the intention is to broaden the curatorial voice, not to lower aesthetic 
standards. Local arts organizations could submit proposals and there could be a review process. 
He stated that the goal is to have the Arts Commission engage with local communities and 
constituencies and to have one of our exhibition slots engage in dialogue with the broader 
community and civic space. 

Commissioner Przyblyski cautioned against using an open call for proposals with a review process 
because San Franciscans are advocates of process and there is the possibility of losing control 
over shaping overall policy and programming. She then stated that as the SFAC Gallery already 
collaborates with the local community in creating exhibitions, perhaps the Gallery should 
foreground and highlight these relationships in its press and auxiliary programming. 
Commissioner Przyblyski also proposed that the exhibition of works for the sister cities artist 
exchange program could be installed in a variety of locations, not just the SFAC Gallery, and could 
extend beyond the visual arts to include literature and music. 

14. Standards and Guidelines for Busts in City Hall 

Ms. Manton reported that she is working on guidelines for the design and placement of 
commemorative busts in City Hall. She stated that decisions about the guidelines will be made in 
consultation with the Mayor's Office. Ms. Manton explained that the impetus for developing these 
guidelines was highlighted by the challenges of finding a location for the Harvey Milk bust. Now 
that another commemorative bust in honor of Mayor Sutro is being proposed by Leonid Nakhodkin 
of the United Humanitarian Mission, Ms. Manton believes it is important to have some policies in 
place to guide the design and approval process. While all the thirteen busts in the City Hall are 
bronze, Mr. Nakhodkin believes a bust in marble is most suitable for its placement on the second 
floor of City Hall in the North Light Court. Ms. Manton explained that the new guidelines would 
serve to create consistency in the materials, style, scale and placement of busts proposed for City 
Hall. Commissioner Hunter agreed there should be homogeneity in the materials used for busts in 
City Hall. 

There was some discussion regarding who has the authority to determine who is granted a bust in 
City Hall. Commissioner Hunter stated that the Arts Commission should guide decisions on 
aesthetics but not decisions on who gets a bust in City Hall. Commissioner Przyblyski explained 
that the busts in City Hall have been gifts to the City from people who have raised the money for 
the projects. The design and placement of the busts have been approved by the Arts Commission 
and the City Hall Preservation Advisory Committee. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that Commissioners should review the guidelines before further 
discussion. Ms. Manton stated that she will circulate the draft of the guidelines and respond to Mr. 



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Nakhodkin. 

15. Art on Market Street Program 

Due to time restrictions, Ms. Moran presented one of the four proposals for the 2008-2009 Art on 
Market Street Program and will present the remaining three proposals to the Visual Arts 
Committee in June. Ms. Moran presented the work of Jenifer K. Wofford. She distributed copies of 
Ms. Wofford's sketch of the first poster, which will be developed in full color for the final poster. 
The proposal is for a series of posters depicting a narrative of a nurse who emigrates to San 
Francisco to work in a hospital, and experiences the tumultuous periods of the mid-70s in the 
Philippines and the United States. Each of the six posters will reflect one year from 1973 to 1978. 
Ms. Moran stated that auxiliary programming will include the neighboring Filipino community. The 
work will be installed in mid-September for three months. Ms. Wofford's work will also be 
exhibited in the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts exhibition Bay Area Now, from July to October 
2008. 

16. Central Subway 

Ms. Moran reported that over 400 applications were received for the Central Subway Call for 
Artists and over 60 are from Chinese and Chinese-American artists, a percentage larger than 
usual, because of the hands-on outreach completed primarily by the Chinese Culture Center and 
the Chinese Community Development Center in collaboration with the Arts Commission. Ms. 
Moran stated that outreach to the Chinese community serves as a model for the type of outreach 
needed to bring in artists from outside the public art field. She reported that efforts to work 
closely with the Chinese community on the Central Subway will continue. 

17. New Business 

Ms. Manton reported that artist Maya Lin will commence installation of her wire landscape 
sculpture at the Academy of Sciences on August 18, 2008. Ms. Manton reported that Chronicle 
Books has approached the Public Art Program to create a public art walking tour as part of the 
series called City Walks with Kids. Ms. Manton stated that the Transbay Terminal contract 
between the Arts Commission and the Transbay Joint Powers Authority has been approved by the 
Transbay Joint Powers Authority. This contract provides the Arts Commission with an 
administrative fee of $950,000 for managing the public art program to be developed for the new 
Transbay Program. Ms. Manton also reported that the Public Art Program is gearing up to hold the 
first workshop of the Public Art Academy in October 2008. Commissioner Przyblyski stated that 
outreach for the workshop should be done to surrounding art schools. 

Ms. Pontious reported on her intention to terminate the contract with artist Beliz Brothers for 
creating photographic light boxes for the Laguna Honda Hospital. Ms. Brothers has been 
unresponsive to e-mails and phones calls in the past year. Commissioner Przyblyski responded 
that Ms. Pontious should use her best judgment and has the support of the Commissioners. 

Ms. Shiffler reported there was a review in the Guardian of the current exhibition, and coverage in 
the Chronicle's 96 Hours by Friday, May 30, 2008. 

18. Old Business 

There is no old business to report. 

19. Adjournment 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:25 pm. 



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MC 5/28/2008 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts Commission office, 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during regular business hours. INFO: Mary 
Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic devices are 
prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the removal from the meeting of 
any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell phone, pager, or other similar sound- 
producing electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or administrative action 
may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San Francisco Campaign and Governmental 
Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register and report lobbying activity. For more information 
about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 
Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 
http ://www. sfgov.org/ethics. 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. Commissions, 
boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct the people's business. This 
ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the people and that City operations are open 
to the people's review. For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report 
a violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine 
Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by 
phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at sotf@sfgov.org. 

Citizens interested in obtaining a free copy of the Sunshine Ordinance can request a copy from Mr. 
Darby or by printing Chapter 67 of the San Francisco Administrative Code on the Internet, 
http://www.sfgov.org/sunshine/. 



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GALLERY 



DRAFT 

The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery presents 

Spiraling Echoes 

A Sound Sculpture for the Rotunda of San Francisco City Hall 
By internationally renowned artist Bill Fontana 

Dates: January 22 - April 24, 2009 

Opening Reception: Thursday, January 22, 5:30 - 7:30pm (tentative) 
Location: San Francisco City Hall Rotunda and upper floor walkways 
Hours: Monday - Friday, 8am - 8pm 

The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery is pleased to announce an expansion of the Art at 
City Hall program, with a new exhibition project featuring internationally renowned artists 
commissioned to create site-specific installations that interact with the architecture of San 
Francisco's historic City Hall. Spiraling Echoes, by San Francisco-based sound artist Bill 
Fontana reflects the San Francisco Arts Commission's commitment to presenting visual arts 
projects that highlight our regional diversity and position Bay Area visual art production within an 
international contemporary art landscape. By commissioning new works such as Spiraling Echoes, 
the SFAC Gallery provides new and challenging opportunities for contemporary art to engage with 
a civic dialogue, while making art accessible to a broad audience. 

Fontana's sound installation, Spiraling Echoes, will employ an acoustic phenomenon common to 
bats, dolphins and whales known as echolocation, in which high-frequency sounds produce an 
acute directional beam of ultrasound. Eight transducers will be mounted in City Hall high above the 
floor around the circular colonnade within the Rotunda's dome. These transducers will send out 
ultrasonic beams that function as carrier waves for this project's soundtrack Fontana is creating for 
this project. When the transducers are moving, the sound beams will travel downward in space, 
playing off of and moving through the various surfaces of the rotunda. 

Spiraling Echoes will translate the visual experience of the architecture in the Rotunda (the focal 
point in the building with its marble staircase and ornate carvings) into sound. As people move 
through City Hall's rotunda they will hear contemporary and historic sounds from various San 
Francisco events and locations. The sounds will not follow the individual, but rather a person will 
move through different sound points. The sounds will be experienced most notably on the fourth 
floor corridors overlooking the Rotunda, and spiraling echoes will float down into the space 
becoming gradually softer, and finally heard at the volume of a whisper on the first level. 
Encountering sounds from another place and/or time will provoke a sense that the City's 
character, its history and vibrancy have been captured within the walls of our treasured City 
Hall. 



About Bill Fontana 

Bill Fontana is a world-renowned pioneer of sound art who has created monumental, site-specific, 
aural experiential installations around the globe. For the past 30 years, Fontana has used sound as 
a sculptural medium to interact with and transform our perceptions of visual and architectural 
spaces. Many of his sound sculptures — installed on the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, London's 
Millennium Bridge and Big Ben, stations along the Lyon light rail system, and the Brooklyn 
Bridge— are a marriage of public space and contemporary art. Fontana has gained international 
prominence, exhibiting at such venerable institutions as the Tate Modern, the Venice Biennale and 
the Whitney Museum of American Art. It has been 20 years since Fontana, a San Francisco 
resident for three decades, completed his last major commission here. 



About the San Francisco Arts Commission 

The San Francisco Arts Commission is the City agency that champions the arts in San Francisco. 
We believe that a creative cultural environment is essential to the City's well-being. Our programs 
integrate the arts into all aspects of City life. The Commission was established by charter in 1932 
(Charter sections 5.103 and 16.106). 



Visual Art Committee Meeting 

May 21 , 2008 

Support materials presented by Gallery Director, Meg Shiftier, for an update presentation 
on the SFAC Gallery project: 

Spiraling Echoes 

A Sound Sculpture for the Rotunda of San Francisco City Hall 

By internationally renowned artist Bill Fontana 

Dates: January 22 - April 24, 2009 

Opening Reception: Thursday, January 22, 5:30 - 7:30pm (tentative) 
Location: San Francisco City Hall rotunda and upper floor walkways 
Hours: Monday - Friday, 8am - 8pm 

Budget 
Secured Funds: 

$30,000 SFAC Gallery ($5000 pd to Bill in Feb 2007) 

$25,000 NEA 

$55,000 Total Secured 

Expenses Summary 

$19,300 Artist honorarium, installation and additional labor 

$39,700 Equipment 

$23,900 PR, marketing, advertising, brochure, on-site didactics 

$4,000 Project Coordinator 

$10,000 Opening Reception 

$1,500 Fund-raising budget 

$98,400 Total Budget 

$43,400 Need to Raise 

Will be applying for additional support from: Adobe, Fleishhacker and the San Francisco 
Foundation. 

Motion 

Bill's contract will include the first two line items (honoraria, contract labor and 
equipment) under expenses, which totals $59,000. 1 have built a contingency into the 
motion. 

Community Buy-In 

We conducted a sound test at City Hall on Mon., May 19, 2008 - in attendance: 

Luis R. Cancel, Director of Cultural Affairs 

Meg Shiftier, SFAC Gallery Director 

Rachelle Axel, SFAC Development Director 

Susan Mizner, Director, Mayor's Office of Disability 

Mike Farrah, Director, Mayor's Office of Neighborhood Services 

Rohan Lane, Interim General Manager, City Hall 

Ellen Schumer, City Hall Docent, City Hall Preservation Advisory Commission 



Visual Art Committee Meeting: Discussion 
May 21, 2008 



In 2008 the SFAC Gallery produced: 
-Status quo since I arrived 

o 5 exhibitions at 401 Van Ness. 

o 5 exhibitions at Grove Street. 

o 4 exhibitions on the ground floor of City Hall. 

o Opening night events for each exhibition at 401 VN and City Hall. 

o 1 major fund-raising event 
+Added 

o 1 series of North Light Court Banners. 

o 1 series of Decaux kiosk posters. 

o 1-3 educational programs (ranging from Brown Bag Lunch Discussions to 
major panel discussions) for each exhibition at all locations. 

o Worked with the educational department to assist in producing 3 lesson plans 
for exhibitions at 401 Van Ness. 

o Radio broadcast (in collaboration with Frank Prattle, KPOO, and PS1) with 36 
guests and 17 shows. 

o 2 brochure/catalogues (After the Revolution & Resisting Dominion) 
Side note: This is accomplished with a staff of two full-time and one part-time person. 

Upcoming new circumstances: 

o In the fall of 2008 Dana Hemenway, Gallery Manager, will be leaving after 4 
years with the SFAC Gallery. She will be headed to a local MFA program. 

o The Gallery is assuming the lead administrative role in presenting Bill Fontana 
at City Hall. (late-January though late-April) 

o Possible tour of the 2008 City Hall exhibition, After the Revolution. 

o We will produce a brochure/catalogue for 3 - 5 exhibitions next year. 

o More Advisory Board fund-raising and community-building events. 

Proposed changes in Gallery schedule/activities: 

o 4 exhibitions a year (instead of 5) at 401 VN and Grove Street. 

o Perhaps 3 exhibitions a year (instead of 4) on the ground floor of City Hall. 

o 2 series of North Light Court Banners if funding presents itself. 

o Produce 4-5 lesson plans (with the education department) for exhibitions at 

401 Van Ness and/or City Hall. 
o 2-3 Board events. 
o Addition of one part time employee. 

o Addition of two new reserved exhibition slots (could be at any of our three 
locations) for: 

o A collaborative exhibition hosted at the SFAC Gallery with another local 
arts organization. The organization would be chosen as a result of a 
call for proposals, 
o A Sister-City exhibition. 




San Francisco International Airport 



May 20, 2008 



P 0. Box 8097 
San Francisco, C A 94128 
Tel 650.821.5000 
fax 650 821 5005 
www.flysfo com 



AIRPORT 
COMMISSION 

CITY AND COUNTY 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

GAVIN NEWSOM 
MAYOR 

LARRY MAZZOIA 
PRESIDENT 

LINDA S CRAYTON 
VICE PRESIDENT 

CARYL ITO 

ELEANOR JOHNS 
ICHARD 1 GUGGENHIME 

JOHN L. MARTIN 

AIRPORT DIRECTOR 



San Francisco Arts Commission 
25 Van Ness, Suite 240 
San Francisco, C A 94102 
Attention: Luis R. Cancel 

Director of Cultural Affairs, 



Proposed Memorandum of Understanding between 

the Airport Commission and 

the Arts Commission of the 

City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Mr. Cancel: 

Enclosed for your consideration please find a proposed Memorandum of 
Understanding (MOU) between the Airport Commission and the Arts Commission of 
the City and County of San Francisco in connection with the five- and ten-year 
Capital Plans at the San Francisco International Airport. The Airport is 
recommending that the Arts Commission approve the proposed MOU, which, among 
other things: 

• Has a term often years, to coincide with the Airport's ten-year Capital 
Plan; 

• Coordinates the activities of both commissions with respect to the 
acquisition, maintenance and removal of artwork at the Airport; 

• Specifies the accounting procedures to be followed for the expenditure of 
art-related monies at the Airport; 

• Commits the Airport Commission to assist the Arts Commission in 
maintaining the art collection at the Airport by providing maintenance 
funding and personnel; and 

• Sets an art enrichment allocation percentage for eligible Airport capital 
improvement projects in accordance with the following scale: 



Total Gross Estimated Construction Costs of 
Each Eligible Capital Improvement Project 

First $100 million of costs 

Next $100 million of costs (up to $200 million 
total) 

Next $800 million of costs (up to $1 billion total) 

Costs in excess of $1 billion 



Art Enrichment Percentage 
2.00% 

1.75% 

1.50% 
1.00% 



L 



Luis R. Cancel 
May 20, 2008 
Page 2 

As you know, Section 3.19(a) of the Administrative Code sets a standard art 
enrichment allocation percentage of 2% of the gross estimated constructions costs of 
eligible construction projects. But Section 3. 1 9(a) also provides that if "the officer, 
board or commission concerned determines that [2%] of the gross estimated 
construction cost is inappropriate for art enrichment, such officer, board or 
commission shall submit its recommendation regarding the art enrichment budget and 
the basis for its determination to the Arts Commission for the Arts Commission's 
review." If the Airport is unable to resolve the matter with the Arts Commission, the 
matter "shall be submitted to the Mayor by the Arts Commission for final 
determination within 60 days from the date the recommendation is made." 

In light of the above, and in connection with the eligible projects in its five- 
and ten-year Capital Plans, the Airport is recommending an art enrichment percentage 
based on the size of the project according to the scale above for the following 
reasons: 

Historical Relationship : The proposed MOU is a continuation of the Airport 
and Arts Commissions' cooperative relationship over the years that was embodied in 
an original 1995 MOU between the two commissions in connection with the Airport's 
Near Term Master Plan (NTMP), for which the art enrichment allocation was set at 
1.50%. 

Most Projects in the 2% Percentage Range : Under the Airport's current 
Capital Plan, most of the eligible projects are expected to be under $100 million and 
to generate art enrichment funds at the standard 2%. As currently planned, only two 
or three large projects would exceed $100 million in costs and none would exceed 
$800 million. Thus, only a small number of projects would have an art enrichment 
percentage below 2%. 

Airport Funding for Arts Commission's Maintenance Work : Section 5.103 of 
the City Charter delegates to the Arts Commission, among other things, the 
maintenance of the works of art owned by the City. The Airport is owned by the City 
and is operated as an enterprise fund department under the management of the Airport 
Commission which has charge, under Section 4.1 15 of the City Charter, of the 
construction, management, use and control of all property and assets located at the 
Airport, including the exclusive authority to issue revenue bonds for airport-related 
purposes. The Airport houses a large collection of works of art which have been 
purchased over the years with the proceeds of Airport revenue bonds. The Arts 
Commission has not had sufficient resources to adequately maintain the Airport art 
collection in prior years and this maintenance funding gap is likely to worsen because 
the art allocation funds relating to Airport projects come from the proceeds of tax- 
exempt Airport revenue bonds, which, under federal tax law regulations, can only be 
used to purchase additional new artwork but not for maintenance. To assist in 
providing the necessary maintenance and conservation of the collection, the Airport 
Commission proposes a small reduction in the art allocation percentage for its largest 
projects and is willing, in exchange, to provide on-site personnel (including from the 
Airport Museums) and maintenance funding in its annual operating budget to assist in 
maintaining the Airport art collection over the next ten years. 



Luis R. Cancel 
May 20, 2008 
Page 3 

The Airport Commission and staff look forward to continuing the cooperative 
relationship they have enjoyed with the Arts Commission over the years, and hope 
that the proposed MOU will help not only to increase the number of works of art at 
the Airport, but also provide the maintenance and conservation required to keep the 
collection in top condition. Please do not hesitate to call me at (650) 821-5000 with 
any questions or to discuss further. 



Very truly yours, 




John L. Martin 
Airport Director 



cc: Susan Pontious, Public Art Program 
Blake Summers, Airport Museums 



D3AFT 



MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN 

THE AIRPORT COMMISSION AND 

THE ARTS COMMISSION OF 

THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

This MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (this M MOU") dated May 1, 2008, 
constitutes a mutual agreement between the AIRPORT COMMISSION and the ARTS 
COMMISSION of the City and County of San Francisco (the "City"), for the purposes of 
defining the working relationship and responsibilities of each department. 

Background 

In accordance with Section 4. 1 15 of the City Charter, the Airport Commission has 
charge of the construction, management, supervision, maintenance, extension, operation, use and 
control of all property and assets located at the San Francisco International Airport (the 
"Airport"), including the exclusive authority to plan and issue revenue bonds for airport-related 
purposes, subject to Board of Supervisors approval. 

In accordance with Section 5.103 of the City Charter, the Arts Commission is required, 
among other things, to approve the designs for all public structures; to approve the design and 
location of all works of art before they are acquired, transferred or sold by the City, or are placed 
upon or removed from City property; to maintain and keep an inventory of works of art owned by 
the City; and to maintain the works of art owned by the City. 

In connection with the Airport Commission's Near Term Master Plan (the "NTMP"), the 
Airport and Arts Commissions previously entered into a Memorandum of Understanding dated 
1995 (the "Prior MOU") to define their respective responsibilities in connection with the NTMP. 
After completion of the NTMP and several years without significant new construction projects at 
the Airport, the Airport Commission is now preparing to undertake several new large capital 
projects as part of its Domestic Terminal Redevelopment Plan and updated five-year capital plan, 
all of which will require coordination and cooperation between the Airport and Arts 
Commissions. Accordingly, this MOU is intended to supersede the Prior MOU. 

This MOU is made in recognition of the requirements of the Federal Aviation 
Administration's ("FAA") Final Policy and Procedures Concerning the Use of Airport Revenue 
(the "Revenue Diversion Policy") and the 1981 Settlement Agreement between the City, the 
Airport Commission and the major airlines serving the Airport. 

In recognition of the foregoing, the Airport and Arts Commissions have agreed to the 
following provisions relative to the acquisition and maintenance of works of art for the Airport. 

I. General Administrative Procedures 

Both the Arts Commission and the Airport Commission agree to follow the procedures 
below: 

A. Application of the Agreement 

The application of the Agreement shall be for Art Enrichment and Maintenance 
Expenses from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 201 7. 

B. Commitment to Maintain the Airport Art Collection 



The Airport Commission will maintain the art collection at the Airport as 
provided in Section V.A., including entering into a separate memorandum of 
understanding with the Arts Commission for direct charges for the annual 
maintenance costs described in Section V.A.4. The Airport Commission will 
also fund the salary and fringe benefits of an Assistant Museum Registrar located 
at the Airport to assist, among other things, in supervising and performing the 
maintenance of the art collection. The maintenance and compensation costs 
described in this Section are hereinafter referred to as "Maintenance Expenses". 

C. Maintenance Endowment 

In accordance with the Section 3.19 of the Administrative Code, 5% of the art 
enrichment allocation of Capital Improvement Projects may be used for 
maintenance where the funding source allows, and may furthermore be placed in 
an interest bearing account. To that end, during the NTMP, the Airport 
established a fund referred to herein as the "Airport Art Endowment Fund" from 
eligible art enrichment funds generated by taxable NTMP Airport revenue bonds, 
and annually makes available the interest earned from that Fund to the Arts 
Commission for the purposes of maintaining the Airport Art Collection. 

D. Art Enrichment Funds 

1. Calculation of Contributions : In accordance with Section 3.19 of the 

Administrative Code, funds for art enrichment will be calculated on a 
project by project basis, at a declining percentage of the total gross 
estimated (not final) construction costs (as estimated at the completion of 
construction documents and application for Phase III approval from the 
Arts Commission Civic Design Review Committee) of each eligible 
capital improvement project (a "Project") based on the following tiers: 

Total Gross Estimated Construction Costs of Art Enrichment 

Each Eligible Capital Improvement Project Percentage 

First $ 1 00 million of costs 2.00% 

Next $100 million of costs (up to $200 million 1.75% 

total) 

Next $800 million of costs (up to $ 1 billion total) 1 .50% 

Costs in excess of $ 1 billion 1 .00% 

Example of Calculation: as an illustration, the art enrichment 
contribution for a hypothetical eligible capital improvement project with 
estimated gross construction costs of $500 million would be equal to 
$8,250,000, calculated as follows: 

Total Gross Estimated Construction Costs of Art 

Hypothetical $500 Million Project Enrichment Funds 

2.00% of first $100 million of costs $2,000,000 

1 .75% of next $ 1 00 million of costs 1 ,750,000 

1 .50% of next $300 million of costs 4,500,000 

Project Total $8,250,000 



2. Art Enrichment Survey Form : Prior to being scheduled for Civic Design 

Review at the Arts Commission, the Airport shall submit a completed 
Art Enrichment Survey form and make contact with the Public Art Staff 
regarding each Project. 

II. Accounting Procedures 

A. Direct Charge Account 

Upon appropriation and availability of bond proceeds for each eligible Project, 
the Airport Commission will set up a direct charge account for the art enrichment 
funds relating to such Project. The Arts Commission will approve and pay all art 
enrichment related costs (other than maintenance) out of this account. 

B. Annual Memorandum of Understanding 

The Airport Commission will enter into a separate memorandum of 
understanding with the Art Commission for direct charges for the annual 
maintenance costs (per Section V.A. hereof). 

C. Separate Accounting for Bond and Operating Funds 

The Arts Commission will maintain separate accounting of the use of the 
following Airport funds: 

1. Art Enrichment (Bond Funds) : Funds comprising the Art Enrichment 
contribution provided from bond proceeds or other Airport sources in 
accordance with Administrative Code provisions and the agreed : upon 
percentages of the estimated construction costs of eligible Projects set 
forth above. Bond proceeds may be used in accordance with Section 
3. 19 of the Administrative Code only for art acquisition costs that are 
properly chargeable to the capital account of the facilities for accounting 
purposes and not for maintenance or operating costs. 

2. Maintenance (Operating Funds) : Funds provided by the Airport from 
operating funds allocated through an annual budget request submitted by 
the Arts Commission to the Airport through the Airport Staff Liaison by 
October 1 of each fiscal year shall be used for maintenance, 
conservation, relocation and removal of artwork, including Airport and 
Arts Commission staff time associated with coordinating, overseeing 
and/or performing the work. 

3. Maintenance (Endowment Interest Earnings) : Interest earned from the 
Airport Art Endowment Fund each fiscal year shall be deposited into a 
direct charge account for maintenance of the Airport art collection and 
made available to the Arts Commission at the beginning of the following 
fiscal year (i.e. interest earned in FY 06/07 shall be deposited at the 
beginning of FY 07/08). 

D. Annual Summary of Expenditures 

The Arts Commission will maintain accurate records of all expenditures of 
Airport funds and maintain files with copies of all contract agreements, contract 
payments, purchase orders and other invoices and expenditures which shall be 



provided to the Airport upon request. The Arts Commission shall keep an 
accurate record of which Airport bond proceeds are used for the purchase of each 
work of art. On or before June 30 of each fiscal year, the Arts Commission will 
provide the Airport with an annual summary statement of all such expenditures. 

E. Jurisdiction; Use of Funds from the Sale of Artwork 

In accordance with Sections 4.1 15 and 5.103 of the City Charter and the FAA's 
Revenue Diversion Policy, all art acquisitions using Airport funds are properties 
of the City under joint jurisdiction of the Airport and Arts Commissions. All 
proceeds from any sale or auction of artwork at the Airport shall be distributed as 
follows: 

1 . If the artwork was acquired with the proceeds of tax-exempt Airport 

revenue bonds and (a) such bonds are still outstanding on the sale date, (b) such 
bonds have been refunded and the refunding bonds are still outstanding, or (b) 
the Airport and Arts Commissions cannot determine whether such bonds are still 
outstanding, then an amount equal to the original purchase price of the artwork 
shall be deposited into a direct charge account and used to purchase artwork at 
the Airport per Sections II. A. and II.C.l. above. If the bonds are no longer 
outstanding or were taxable bonds, no deposit is necessary under this paragraph. 

2. Any payment due the artist under the California Resale Royalties Act 
shall be paid to the artist. 

3. Any remaining amount shall be credited to the Airport Art Endowment 
Fund and expended per Section II.C.3. above. 

F. Annual Inventory 

On or before June 30 of each fiscal year, the Arts Commission will provide the 
Airport with an inventory of all art objects acquired by the Art Commission for 
the Airport. This inventory shall represent a part of the Airport's fixed assets 
inventory list. Likewise, the Arts Commission will provide the Airport with 
documentation related to any artwork that the Arts Commission has de- 
accessioned. 

III. Coordination, Cooperation, and Communication 

The Airport and Arts Commissions will continue to work together in the spirit of mutual 
cooperation to acquire outstanding artworks for the Airport and to ensure the 
coordination of efforts to maintain and conserve the collection. The Staff Liaisons and 
the Airport Art Steering Committee facilitate continued good communication and 
coordination for the art enrichment program. 

A. Staff Liaisons 

1. Airport Staff Liaison : The Airport Director shall appoint an Airport 
Staff Liaison to facilitate communication between staff of the Airport 
and Arts Commissions and to help facilitate the Arts Commission's work 
at the Airport. 

2. Arts Commission Staff Liaison : The Public Art Director shall appoint 
the Arts Commission staff liaison and project manager for the Airport. 



B. Airport Art Steering Committee (AASC) 

1. Composition: 

The Airport Art Steering Committee will be composed of six to eight members: 
half of the representatives appointed by the Airport Commission and half 
appointed by the Arts Commission. 

2. Purpose, Goals and Objectives 

a. Purpose: The purpose of the Airport Art Steering Committee is 
to develop policy and make recommendations for the Art Enrichment 
Program at the Airport. The scope of the committee's purview includes 
both the existing collection and new art enrichment projects. Steering 
Committee recommendations for the purchase or commissioning of new 
artwork shall be approved by the Arts and Airport Commissions as 
outlined in this agreement. 

b. Goals : To promote an art enrichment program for the airport 
that meets the following criteria: 

• Results in an art program/collection of the highest aesthetic standards 

• Provides enjoyment for the Airport visitor. 

• Functions within the Airport's operational requirements 

• Enhances the national and international prestige of the Airport and 
the City. 

c. Objectives: 

i. To develop, review and revise as necessary policy and 

program procedure guidelines relative to the permanent 
art collection at the Airport. 

ii. To oversee the execution of the art acquisition 

component of the Airport Commission's Domestic 
Terminal Redevelopment Plan and applicable five-year 
capital plans, and to assist in updating such plans or 
undertake the creation of a new art master plan as 
necessary: 

• To review and approve planning objectives. 

• To review drafts of art master planning documents 
and comment as necessary. 

• To present and support adoption of all of the above 
to the Airport and Art Commissions. 

lii. To oversee the commissioning of new artworks: 

• To review and approve recommended locations for 
artwork installations. 

• To review and approve project guidelines and 
budget. 






• Review selection panel recommendations and 
recommend approval to respective commissions. 

• Review and approve artist proposals. 

• To promote and support Committee 
recommendations to Arts and Airport Commissions. 

iv. To provide ongoing stewardship of the Airport 

collection, including but not limited to: 

• Ongoing evaluation of the collection. 

• Review and approval of recommendations regarding works to be 
de-accessioned and/or re-sited. 

d. AASC Meeting Agenda and Minutes : The Arts Commission will 
provide the Airport Commission Secretary with copies of all AASC 
meeting agendas and minutes. 

IV. Selection/Commissioning and De-accessioning of Artwork 

A. Artist/ Artwork Selection 

The selection of artists and/or artwork will be carried out in accordance with the 
Art Commission's Policies and Guidelines for the Civic Art Collection. 

B. Artist Selection Panel Representation 

In accordance with the Arts Commission's guidelines, the Arts Commission shall 
appoint all guest members of artist selection panels. Selection panels for Airport 
projects shall be comprised of the following voting members: 

• 1 member representing the Airport from the Airport Art Steering 
Committee. 

• 1 member representing the Arts Commission. 

• Up to 3 guest arts professionals. 

• At the discretion of the Arts Commission, 1 member of the project 
architectural team may be appointed. 

C. Review and Approval of Selected Artists, Art Proposals, Direct Art 
Purchases, and Locations for Artwork 

1. Artist Selection 

Artists recommended by Selection Panels for design contracts will be 
submitted to the Arts Commission for approval. 

2. Artists' Project Proposals 

Artists' project proposals will be reviewed and approved by the AASC 
prior to being submitted to the Arts Commissions for similar approval. 
At the completion of design development, proposals will be submitted to 
the Airport Commission for final approval prior to the Arts Commission 
commissioning fabrication of the artwork. 

3. Approval of Direct Purchase of Artwork 



All artwork proposed for acquisition through direct purchase for the 
Airport will be reviewed and approved by the AASC prior to being 
submitted to the Airport and Arts Commissions for approval. 

4. Proposed Gifts 

a. Proposed gifts of artwork to the Airport will be considered in 

accordance with the Arts Commissions' Gift Policy, incorporated in 
its Policies and Guidelines for the Civic Art Collection. In 
accordance with those policies, these special conditions shall apply 
for gifts of art proposed for the Airport: 

• The proposed artwork should be within the focus of the Airport's 
collection, which is defined as a collection of contemporary fine 
art (1960 to present) by artists of recognized reputation. The 
collection emphasis is on the representation of Bay Area artists. 

• Priorities for acquisition, as defined in the Assessment and 
Recommendations Report ( 1 995) prepared by Katherine Holland 
and Karen Tsujimoto (or any updated or subsequent assessment 
evaluation approved by the AASC and the Arts Commission) 
shall apply when considering the acceptance of gifts for the 
collection at the Airport. 



• 



Special care shall be given to determining whether or not there is 
an appropriate site for installation of the artwork and whether or 
not the artwork can be maintained within the Airport 
environment and within available resources. 

b. The AASC will review all proposals for gifts of art to be sited at the 
Airport and make a recommendation to either accept or decline the 
gift to the Visual Arts Committee of the Arts Commission. If the 
Visual Arts Committee recommends acceptance of the gift, the 
proposal will be submitted to the Airport Commission for approval 
prior to the item being submitted to the full Arts Commission for 
acceptance by Resolution. 

5. Site Approval 

Proposed sites for new acquisitions shall be submitted to the AASC, the 
Arts Commission, and the Airport's Design Review Committee for 
approval. 

6. Final Acceptance 

The Arts Commission will review and approve completed and/or 
installed art prior to final acceptance of the artwork into the City's Civic 
Art Collection. 

D. Removal, Relocation and/or De-accessioning of Artwork 

1. Airport Remodeling or Operational Changes Requiring Relocation 

or Storage of Artwork. 



Airport employees involved in planning or design shall initiate early 
contact with the Airport Staff Liaison to ensure proper coordination with 
the Arts Commission for the removal and relocation of artwork. 
Proposed remodeling that will require the removal of major artworks, 
impair the visibility of the artwork, or otherwise affect the relationship of 
the artwork to the site, will first be submitted to the AASC for review 
and recommendation prior to being submitted to the Arts Commission 
for approval. The Arts Commission will make a good faith effort to 
respond to a request by the Airport to relocate artwork in a timely 
manner. 

Most relocation and/or storage of artwork necessitated by Airport 
remodeling will be handled on an Airport/ Arts Commission staff level, 
and executed by the Airport Museums staff as part of routine 
maintenance. 

2. Permanent Removal, Alteration, Destruction and/or De-accessioning 
of Artwork 

Permanent removal, alteration, destruction or de-accessioning of artwork 
will be reviewed and approved by the AASC, prior to submission to the 
Arts Commission in accordance with Section 7, Removal, Alteration, 
Destruction and De-accessioning Policies and Procedures of the Arts 
Commission's Policies and Guidelines for the Civic Art Collection, and 
in accordance with the relevant sections of the City Charter, 
Administrative Code, and state and federal law. 

3. Approval of Sites for Relocated Artwork 

The Arts Commission shall submit proposed relocation sites for 
displaced artwork to the Airport's Design Review Committee prior to 
proceeding with relocation. Relocation of major artwork, where the 
removal or relocation will have a significant impact on either the artwork 
or the new proposed site will also be submitted to the AASC for its 
review and recommendation. 

4. Cost of Art Removal, Relocation and Storage 

The expense of removal, transporting, relocating and/or storing artwork, 
or any other related expenses, including Arts Commission administrative 
costs incurred as a result of Airport remodeling that necessitates the 
removal of artwork, will be borne by the Airport and will be incorporated 
in the Airport's Capital Plan. The Arts Commission shall submit to the 
Airport a written request with copies of documentation detailing the costs 
to be reimbursed. 

V. Maintenance 

A. Types of Maintenance 

There are three major types of maintenance needs for the art collection at the 
Airport: 

1. Repair, Replacement, or Improvement of Arrvvork's Installation: 

This includes repair or replacement of cases, framing, installation barriers, etc. 



These improvements will be made by Airport staff and funded through the 
Airport's facilities maintenance budget. The Airport staff will get the approval of 
the Arts Commission prior to making any repairs or replacements of cases, 
framing or installation that changes or differs from the original. 

2. Routine Maintenance: This includes dusting of artwork and Plexiglas 
cases, (including overhead artwork requiring the use of a mechanical lift to 
reach), cleaning glass barriers and the floor behind the barriers, changing light 
bulbs, and other tasks that require appropriate education, experience and/or 
technical skill, but do not require the services of a fine art conservator, the 
original artist, or the specialized service of another outside contractor. This work 
will be managed and preformed by Airport staff and funded through the Airport's 
facilities maintenance and operating budget. The Airport Commission will 
ensure that all personnel performing maintenance on the Artwork are qualified 
for the level of work being performed. 

3. Storage: This includes long- and short-term storage for artworks 
removed from display due to Airport remodeling or other reasons. The Airport 
will provide storage for artworks in its collection without charge to the Arts 
Commission. 

4. Major Cleaning, Repair or Conservation: This is work requiring 
specialized equipment and/or expertise; professional inspection of artwork to 
determine when maintenance or conservation is necessary or work requiring 
contact with the artist. This work will be managed by the Arts Commission and 
will be included in an annual budget request to be submitted by the Arts 
Commission to the Airport through the Airport Staff Liaison by October 1 of 
each fiscal year. A separate memorandum of understanding for the work order 
will executed for each fiscal year. 

B. Maintenance Responsibilities and Procedures 

1. Maintenance Plan, Inspection and Reporting: The Arts 
Commission will conduct a formal inspection of the collection on an 
annual basis. The report from this inspection will identify ongoing 
maintenance needs as well as maintenance and conservation projects. 
The Arts Commission and Airport staff will develop an annual 
maintenance plan that will be the basis for the annual budget request 
submitted to the Airport Commission through the Airport Staff Liaison 
by October 1 of each fiscal year. 

2. Daily Maintenance: Airport staff will oversee the daily 
maintenance of the Collection and will follow through with the 
maintenance as provided in Sections V.A.I and 2 above. Any larger 
problem with the Artwork will be brought to the Art Commission's 
attention as soon as it is identified, in order to be addressed as provided 
in Section V.A.4 above. 

3. Records: All pertinent records, artist files, condition reports, 
maintenance records and conservation reports will be kept by the Arts 






Commission. Copies of these documents will be provided to the Airport 
Commission upon request. 

4. Vendor Contracts: The Airport and Arts Commission will 
contract directly with vendors for repair, replacement, cleaning, 
maintenance or improvement of artwork as-needed. 

5. Notification: 

a. The Arts Commission will notify the Airport Staff Liaison, 
Airport Duty Manager and, in the case where work is scheduled 
as part of Airport construction, the Project Manager, in advance 
of scheduling any site work such as installation, removal, 
relocation and/or maintenance of art. 

b. The Airport Staff Liaison will assist the Arts Commission as 
needed in notifying the necessary department(s) or personnel at 
the Airport of any work scheduled by the Arts Commission. 

c. The Airport Staff Liaison is responsible for notifying the Arts 
Commission of any damage, problems, missing plaques, etc. 
associated with the Airport collection. 



10 



IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Airport Commission and the Arts Commission have each 
caused this Memorandum of Understanding to be executed by their duly authorized 
representatives as of the dates set forth below. 



Date 



John L. Martin 
Airport Director 



Date 



Luis Cancel 

Director of Cultural Affairs 



11 









Potrero del Sol Skate Park Wall Mural Proposal 
Evidence of Community Support 

The skaters building and looking forward to skating Potrero del Sol 
Skate Park were very concerned about graffiti on the skate surfaces and its 
detrimental impact on the skate surface. In order to try and deter tagging 
inside the park Friends of Potrero del Sol organized and held a fundraiser to 
pay for the installation of a mural on the outside of the skate park wall. The 
idea is that if the outside wall is painted by local artists in the skating 
community then the space appears complete and street taggers will not come 
and paint in the park. 

In October of 2007 Friends of Potrero del Sol held an art auction and 
raffle at Amber on Church Street. Over 40 pieces of art were auctioned off. 
They included art done by local skateboard graphic designers, well known 
tattoo artists, photographs and a couple of pieces by Buena Vista Elem. 
students. The raffle was for five large lots of skate merchandise, haircuts, 
tattoo time, music, etc. Over 150 people attended the event, including the 
skate park builders, musicians, professional skaters, local skateboard 
manufacturers and shop owners. Enough money was raised to pay for the 
artists'materials for the mural and the time will be donated. 

The skate park has been very much anticipated in the San Francisco 
skating community and beyond since the idea was first raised in 2003. 
There is a strong sense of ownership by the local artists/skater community 
and this will be further reinforced by allowing a local artist to paint a mural 
on the outside of the park walls. 

This project is supported by the following individuals and 
organizations: 

Alfredo Pedroza, Mayors Office of Neighborhood Services, D9 
Jim Lazarus, Recreation and Parks Commission 
Neighborhood Parks Council, Isabel Wade 
Buena Vista Elementary School PTA 

Lower 24 Street Merchants and Neighbors Association, Eric Arguello 
Rolph Playground Neighbors Assoc, Leora Vestel 
Jeanne Darrah, Park and Rec. Open Space Advisory Comte., D9 
Friends of Potrero del Sol Park 
Artwork Rebels 



Funding 

The paint will be paid for by Friends of Potrero del Sol Park and the 
artists' time will be donated. RPD will pay for and install the temporary 
surface to be painted on. 

Timeline 

The preparation will be done on Friday, June 13 th 2008 and Norm will 
work with a small group of artists during Saturday and Sunday, June 14 th to 
complete the mural installation. 

Maintenance Plan 

Timothy Moore 415 680-5653 will work with Joseph Padilla, the 
Recreation and Parks Department Painter Supervisor 415 753-7016 to 
maintain the mural. RPD will paint anti-graffiti paint over the mural once it 
is completed. 

In addition to maintaining the temporary mural, Timothy Moore has 
organized Jason Clemoff and a group of skaters who live in the 
neighborhood to voluntarily clean graffiti off of the skate park's skate 
surfaces. No anti-graffiti paint will be put on the skate surfaces. This will 
be overseen by Joeseph Padilla also. 



, 



NORM STIEN 

As a long-time resident of San Francisco, Norm grew up with the 
artistic community of the inner city impacting his stylistic 
expression. Today you can see his murals around the world. Norm 
has traveled to many different countries Korea, Japan, Europe, and 
Australia for installations. He works in several media. Norm does 
murals, fine painting, tattooing, machining, and silk screening to 
name a few. His world intersects the current aesthetics of skater, 
tattoo and street art. 

Norm has been published in magazines like our local Juxtapose, 
Thrasher. His work has also been featured in Piece by Piece and 
Infamy documentaries. 

Corporations like Coke a Cola and Scion, seeking to appeal to 
today's youth, have commissioned his work. 7th letter, a local 
manufacturer of limited run clothing and jewelry, uses his designs. 

In order to continue to excel in his art and refine his techniques, 
Norm has taken many different accredited classes at various local 
institutions. 

Norm's images can be found on sights such as flicker.com and 
my space. He has thousands of people who photograph and post his 
art for other to enjoy. He works with a group of local artists and 
invites younger art students to participate in his installations. His 
work and methods are at the forefront of contemporary "street" art, 
and is a great influence to many communities. 




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Staff Report 
Date: 5/15/08 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 
From: Susan Pontious 
RE: Airport Memorandum of Understanding 

Attached is the draft of a Memorandum of Understanding between the Arts Commission and 
Airport that will replace the 1995 MOU that was enacted for the Master Plan Projects (i.e. the 
new International Terminal and other support buildings.) The new MOU is for a ten year period 
(2007-2017) and covers capital projects for the Secure Connector ($12 million), Terminal 2 ($220 
million) and possibly T-l (construction budget not established). 

In summary, the most significant change in this MOU is the Airport's proposal to fund the 
ongoing maintenance and conservation of the art collection out of its annual operating budget in 
exchange for a reduction of its art enrichment requirement out of capital funds. 

Background: 

Under the 1995 MOU and prior to the revision of the 1969 Art Enrichment Ordinance, the Arts 
Commission received 1.5% art enrichment from Airport Capital Projects. This was the formula 
used for the $750 million master plan projects (MMP), which generated $11.1 million art 
enrichment; including our $450 million maintenance endowment. This was possible only because 
one project, the rental car facility, was funded from a funding source legal to use for maintenance. 
This is not possible with most projects, which are funded by non-taxable bonds. 

Maintenance of the artwork has been a matter of contention between the Airport and the Arts 
Commission since the early days of the program. Since 2000, the maintenance and conservation 
of artworks in the Airport collection have been funded from the annual interest on the $465 
million endowment (which varies with interest rates between $1 1,000-$20,000 annually.) The 
cost of repairs and replacement of bases, cases and frames has been charged to art enrichment as 
per the 1995 MOU. The Airport has performed minimal maintenance of changing light bulbs and 
dusting the tops of cases. 

Establishing the endowment was a helpful step in supporting the maintenance of the collection, 
but the interest generated from this fund falls far short of what is needed to fully maintain this 
very valuable collection of some 100 artworks. This fund will fall even shorter of the need as the 
collection grows as a result of new capital projects scheduled over the next 10 years. These 
projects will not be funded by a source that would allow a maintenance allocation. This proposed 
MOU provides a solution to this problem. 

Proposed Changes : 

1. The M.O.U. establishes a pre-determined, incremental sliding scale for calculating art 

enrichment from capital bond funds as follows:. Please see attached spread sheet for 
comparison of art enrichment generated from a flat 2% formula and funds generated 
using the sliding scale. 

a. First $100 million: 2% 

b. Next $100 million: 1.75% 

c. Next $800 million: 1.50% 

d. Costs over $1 billion: 1% 



2. The Airport assumes the annual costs of maintaining the collection out of its 
operating budget . Routine maintenance and repairs would be performed by the 
Airport staff, including a new Assoc. Registrar hired by the Museum and Exhibitions 
program for this purpose. 

3. The Arts Commission would be responsible for the maintenance and conservation 
work that involved either the original artist, or professional conservators. This work 
would be funded from two sources: the annual interest from the maintenance 
endowment and an annual allocation from the Airport operating budget . 

4. The Arts Commission and Airport staff would prepare an annual maintenance plan 
and budget by Oct. 1 st of each fiscal year to submit to the Airport Commission for 
funding projected annual maintenance costs. The Arts Commission and Airport will 
enter into an annual MOU for the use of these annually allocated funds. 

Pros and Cons of the MOU: 



I believe that this is an equitable arrangement. Capital funds are one-time funding. Maintenance 
is forever. Please look at the comparison of the Art Commission's reduction in Art Enrichment 
funds vs. what the Airport might be projected to spend on maintenance over 10 years (assuming 
an ongoing expenditure of $150,000 annually) on the attached spread sheet.. Please note that the 
$150,000 figure is the budget figure for FY 07/08 and FY 08/09. For the sake of this 
demonstration, I projected this figure out over 10 years to show what the Airport's obligation 
might total over time. In fact, this figure can be expected to fluctuate annually depending on 
what the Arts Commission anticipates as its conservation needs in any given year. 

The main negative in the MOU is the decrease from the full 2% in Art Enrichment funding we 
could demand under the ordinance. Concern has been expressed that other departments might use 
this precedent as an argument for decreasing their AE obligation. I would argue that while other 
departments might want to reduce their art enrichment, few, if any, can provide the same benefits 
as a "trade". The Airport is unique from other departments for the following reasons: 

• The Airport predictably engages in major capital projects every 10 years or so. As a 
result, it has an ever increasing collection of artwork in need of maintenance. 

• The Airport has the most valuable collection in the city outside of the fine arts museums, 
thereby requiring an even higher responsibility for stewardship of these assets. 

• As a revenue department, the Airport can afford to commit to allocating operating funds 
to the maintenance of its collection that other departments cannot. 

• The Airport Museum and Exhibition program is an accredited museum. As such, the 
Airport has qualified personnel to attend to the maintenance of the collection, and to 
assist the Arts Commission in developing the annual maintenance plan. 

The main advantage of the MOU is that it commits the Airport to taking financial responsibility 
for maintaining its collection, and makes the Airport and Arts Commission partners in developing 
and executing an annual plan based on the needs of the collection. It provides reliable, ongoing 
funding that never has been available for maintenance, and for which there is no other source. At 
the same time Art Enrichment, while less than the full 2% mandated by the ordinance, 
nonetheless exceeds the 1.5% percentage we have historically received from the Airport. The 
proposed agreement would seem to ensure that the Arts Commission will be able to continue to 
acquire outstanding works of art for the Airport, and have the means of protecting and 
maintaining this important asset. 






Legal Requirements of the Ordinance 

In order for the Airport to reduce the flat 2% AE requirement, they must, in accordance with the 

ordinance, submit a letter to the Arts Commission stating 2% is an inappropriate allocation. As 

per the ordinance, if the two parties cannot agree on the allocation, the matter must be submitted 

to the mayor for resolution. It is my understanding that the Airport's attorney is preparing this 

letter.. 

The steps to approving the MOU as drafted include first approving the Airport's request to reduce 
the 2% art enrichment allocation from the bond funds as per the MOU. Then the Commission 
can approve the MOU. 

Recommendation: 

I recommend approval of this MOU. 



Summary of Proposed Formulas 



Admin. Code 
Requirement 
for Art 
Enrichment: 


Total Gross Estimated 
Construction Costs 


2% 








MOU 
Proposal 


First $100 million 


2% 




Next $100 million (up to 
$200 million total) 


1.75% 




Next $800 million (up to 
$1 billion) 


1.50% 




Costs in excess of $1 
billion 


1% 



Example of Impact of Proposed Formulas on Construction Projects 



T-2 Comparison of Art 
Enrichment Funding 
Formulas 




Flat 2% of Construction 
Cost Funding 










Construction Cost: 


AE @ flat 2 % 


Maintienance 
@ 5%, if 
funding source 
eligible 


Annual 
Maintenance 
allocation if 
principle paid 
out over 10 yrs. 


2% 


$220,000,000 


$4,400,000 


$176,000 


$17,600 













- 


MOU Proposal 
w/sliding scale 












Total AE 


Airport 
proposed 
maintenance 
budget for FY 
08/09 from 
operating costs 


Projected cost 
of maintenance 
over 10 yrs. at 
rate of 

$150,000 per 
annum 


2% 


$100,000,000 


$2,000,000 






1.75% 


$100,000,000 


$1,750,000 






1 .50% 


$20,000,000 


$300,000 






1% 










Total 
Construction 


$220,000,000 


$4,050,000 


$150,000 


$1,500,000 


Difference 
between flat 
2% and MOU 
proposal in 
calculating AE 


$0 


$350,000 










Example Calculation for 
$500 Million 
Construction Project 




■1 






Flat 2% of Construction 
Cost Funding 










Construction Cost: 


AE @ flat 2 % 


Maintienance 
@ 5%, if 
funding source 
eligible 


Annual 
Maintenance 
allocation if 
paid out over 
10 yrs. 




$500,000,000 


$10,000,000 


$400,000 


$40,000 
annually 














MOU Proposal 
Porposal w/sliding 
scale 












Total AE 


Airport 
proposed 
maintenance 
budget for FY 
08/09 from 
operating costs 


Projected cost 
of maintenance 
over 10 yrs. at 
rate of 

$150,000 per 
annum 


2% 


$100,000,000 


$2,000,000 






1.75% 


$100,000,000 


$1,750,000 






1.50% 


$300,000,000 


$4,500,000 






1% 










Total 
Construction 


$500,000,000 


$8,250,000 


$150,000 


$1,500,000 


Difference 
between flat 
2% and MOU 
proposal in 
calculating AE 


$0 


$1,750,000 







Breakdown of 








$150,000 






Estimated 


annual 




Facilities fund 


funding to Arts 


maintenance 


Routine maintenance; 


for changing 


Commission 


allocation for 


performed by Airport 


light bulbs, 


from operating 


FY 07/08 & 


staff; charged at rate of 


minor repairs, 


budget for 


08/09 


one FTE: 


etc. 


conservation 




$70,000 


$50,000 


$30,000 



MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN 

THE AIRPORT COMMISSION AND 

THE ARTS COMMISSION OF 

THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

This MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (this "MOU") dated May 1, 2008, 
constitutes a mutual agreement between the AIRPORT COMMISSION and the ARTS 
COMMISSION of the City and County of San Francisco (the "City"), for the purposes of 
defining the working relationship and responsibilities of each department. 

Background 

In accordance with Section 4. 1 15 of the City Charter, the Airport Commission has 
charge of the construction, management, supervision, maintenance, extension, operation, use and 
control of all property and assets located at the San Francisco International Airport (the 
"Airport"), including the exclusive authority to plan and issue revenue bonds for airport-related 
purposes, subject to Board of Supervisors approval. 

In accordance with Section 5.103 of the City Charter, the Arts Commission is required, 
among other things, to approve the designs for all public structures; to approve the design and 
location of all works of art before they are acquired, transferred or sold by the City, or are placed 
upon or removed from City property; to maintain and keep an inventory of works of art owned by 
the City; and to maintain the works of art owned by the City. 

In connection with the Airport Commission's Near Term Master Plan (the "NTMP"), the 
Airport and Arts Commissions previously entered into a Memorandum of Understanding dated 
1995 (the "Prior MOU") to define their respective responsibilities in connection with the NTMP. 
After completion of the NTMP and several years without significant new construction projects at 
the Airport, the Airport Commission is now preparing to undertake several new large capital 
projects as part of its Domestic Terminal Redevelopment Plan and updated five-year capital plan, 
all of which will require coordination and cooperation between the Airport and Arts 
Commissions. Accordingly, this MOU is intended to supersede the Prior MOU. 

This MOU is made in recognition of the requirements of the Federal Aviation 
Administration's ("FAA") Final Policy and Procedures Concerning the Use of Airport Revenue 
(the "Revenue Diversion Policy") and the 1981 Settlement Agreement between the City, the 
Airport Commission and the major airlines serving the Airport. 

In recognition of the foregoing, the Airport and Arts Commissions have agreed to the 
following provisions relative to the acquisition and maintenance of works of art for the Airport. 

I. General Administrative Procedures 

Both the Arts Commission and the Airport Commission agree to follow the procedures 
below: 

A. Application of the Agreement 

The application of the Agreement shall be for Art Enrichment and Maintenance 
Expenses from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2017. 

B. Commitment to Maintain the Airport Art Collection 



The Airport Commission will maintain the art collection at the Airport as 
provided in Section V.A., including entering into a separate memorandum of 
understanding with the Arts Commission for direct charges for the annual 
maintenance costs described in Section V.A.4. The Airport Commission will 
also fund the salary and fringe benefits of an Assistant Museum Registrar located 
at the Airport to assist, among other things, in supervising and performing the 
maintenance of the art collection. The maintenance and compensation costs 
described in this Section are hereinafter referred to as "Maintenance Expenses". 

C. Maintenance Endowment 

In accordance with the Section 3.19 of the Administrative Code, 5% of the art 
enrichment allocation of Capital Improvement Projects may be used for 
maintenance where the funding source allows, and may furthermore be placed in 
an interest bearing account. To that end, during the NTMP, the Airport 
established a fund referred to herein as the "Airport Art Endowment Fund" from 
eligible art enrichment funds generated by taxable NTMP Airport revenue bonds, 
and annually makes available the interest earned from that Fund to the Arts 
Commission for the purposes of maintaining the Airport Art Collection. 

D. Art Enrichment Funds 

1. Calculation of Contributions : In accordance with Section 3.19 of the 

Administrative Code, funds for art enrichment will be calculated on a 
project by project basis, at a declining percentage of the total gross 
estimated (not final) construction costs (as estimated at the completion of 
construction documents and application for Phase III approval from the 
Arts Commission Civic Design Review Committee) of each eligible 
capital improvement project (a "Project") based on the following tiers: 

Total Gross Estimated Construction Costs of Art Enrichment 

Each Eligible Capital Improvement Project Percentage 

First $100 million of costs 2.00% 

Next $ 1 00 million of costs (up to $200 million 1 .75% 

total) 

Next $800 million of costs (up to $1 billion total) 1.50% 

Costs in excess of $ 1 billion 1 .00% 

Example of Calculation: as an illustration, the art enrichment 
contribution for a hypothetical eligible capital improvement project with 
estimated gross construction costs of $500 million would be equal to 
$8,250,000, calculated as follows: 

Total Gross Estimated Construction Costs of Art 

Hypothetical $500 Million Project Enrichment Funds 

2.00% of first $100 million of costs $2,000,000 

1.75% of next $100 million of costs 1,750,000 

1 .50% of next $300 million of costs 4.500.000 

Project Total $8,250,000 



2. Art Enrichment Survey Form : Prior to being scheduled for Civic Design 

Review at the Arts Commission, the Airport shall submit a completed 
Art Enrichment Survey form and make contact with the Public Art Staff 
regarding each Project. 

II. Accounting Procedures 

A. Direct Charge Account 

Upon appropriation and availability of bond proceeds for each eligible Project, 
the Airport Commission will set up a direct charge account for the art enrichment 
funds relating to such Project. The Arts Commission will approve and pay all art 
enrichment related costs (other than maintenance) out of this account. 

B. Annual Memorandum of Understanding 

The Airport Commission will enter into a separate memorandum of 
understanding with the Art Commission for direct charges for the annual 
maintenance costs (per Section V.A. hereof). 

C. Separate Accounting for Bond and Operating Funds 

The Arts Commission will maintain separate accounting of the use of the 
following Airport funds: 

1. Art Enrichment (Bond Funds) : Funds comprising the Art Enrichment 
contribution provided from bond proceeds or other Airport sources in 
accordance with Administrative Code provisions and the agreed-upon 
percentages of the estimated construction costs of eligible Projects set 
forth above. Bond proceeds may be used in accordance with Section 
3.19 of the Administrative Code only for art acquisition costs that are 
properly chargeable to the capital account of the facilities for accounting 
purposes and not for maintenance or operating costs. 

2. Maintenance (Operating Funds) : Funds provided by the Airport from 
operating funds allocated through an annual budget request submitted by 
the Arts Commission to the Airport through the Airport Staff Liaison by 
October 1 of each fiscal year shall be used for maintenance, 
conservation, relocation and removal of artwork, including Airport and 
Arts Commission staff time associated with coordinating, overseeing 
and/or performing the work. 

3. Maintenance (Endowment Interest Earnings) : Interest earned from the 
Airport Art Endowment Fund each fiscal year shall be deposited into a 
direct charge account for maintenance of the Airport art collection and 
made available to the Arts Commission at the beginning of the following 
fiscal year (i.e. interest earned in FY 06/07 shall be deposited at the 
beginning of FY 07/08). 

D. Annual Summary of Expenditures 

The Arts Commission will maintain accurate records of all expenditures of 
Airport funds and maintain files with copies of all contract agreements, contract 
payments, purchase orders and other invoices and expenditures which shall be 






provided to the Airport upon request. The Arts Commission shall keep an 
accurate record of which Airport bond proceeds are used for the purchase of each 
work of art. On or before June 30 of each fiscal year, the Arts Commission will 
provide the Airport with an annual summary statement of all such expenditures. 

E. Jurisdiction; Use of Funds from the Sale of Artwork 

In accordance with Sections 4.1 15 and 5. 103 of the City Charter and the FAA's 
Revenue Diversion Policy, all art acquisitions using Airport funds are properties 
of the City under joint jurisdiction of the Airport and Arts Commissions. All 
proceeds from any sale or auction of artwork at the Airport shall be distributed as 
follows: 

1 . If the artwork was acquired with the proceeds of tax-exempt Airport 
revenue bonds and (a) such bonds are still outstanding on the sale date, (b) such 
bonds have been refunded and the refunding bonds are still outstanding, or (b) 
the Airport and Arts Commissions cannot determine whether such bonds are still 
outstanding, then an amount equal to the original purchase price of the artwork 
shall be deposited into a direct charge account and used to purchase artwork at 
the Airport per Sections II. A. and II.C.l. above. If the bonds are no longer 
outstanding or were taxable bonds, no deposit is necessary under this paragraph. 

2. Any payment due the artist under the California Resale Royalties Act 
shall be paid to the artist. 

3. Any remaining amount shall be credited to the Airport Art Endowment 
Fund and expended per Section II. C. 3. above. 

F. Annual Inventory 

On or before June 30 of each fiscal year, the Arts Commission will provide the 
Airport with an inventory of all art objects acquired by the Art Commission for 
the Airport. This inventory shall represent a part of the Airport's fixed assets 
inventory list. Likewise, the Arts Commission will provide the Airport with 
documentation related to any artwork that the Arts Commission has de- 
accessioned. 

III. Coordination, Cooperation, and Communication 

The Airport and Arts Commissions will continue to work together in the spirit of mutual 
cooperation to acquire outstanding artworks for the Airport and to ensure the 
coordination of efforts to maintain and conserve the collection. The Staff Liaisons and 
the Airport Art Steering Committee facilitate continued good communication and 
coordination for the art enrichment program. 

A. Staff Liaisons 

1 . Airport Staff Liaison : The Airport Director shall appoint an Airport 
Staff Liaison to facilitate communication between staff of the Airport 
and Arts Commissions and to help facilitate the Arts Commission's work 
at the Airport. 

2. Arts Commission Staff Liaison : The Public Art Director shall appoint 
the Arts Commission staff liaison and project manager for the Airport. 






B. Airport Art Steering Committee (AASC) 

1. Composition: 

The Airport Art Steering Committee will be composed of six to eight members: 
half of the representatives appointed by the Airport Commission and half 
appointed by the Arts Commission. 

2. Purpose, Goals and Objectives 

a. Purpose: The purpose of the Airport Art Steering Committee is 
to develop policy and make recommendations for the Art Enrichment 
Program at the Airport. The scope of the committee's purview includes 
both the existing collection and new art enrichment projects. Steering 
Committee recommendations for the purchase or commissioning of new 
artwork shall be approved by the Arts and Airport Commissions as 
outlined in this agreement. 

b. Goals : To promote an art enrichment program for the airport 
that meets the following criteria: 

• Results in an art program/collection of the highest aesthetic standards 

• Provides enjoyment for the Airport visitor. 

• Functions within the Airport's operational requirements 

• Enhances the national and international prestige of the Airport and 
the City. 

c. Objectives: 

i. To develop, review and revise as necessary policy and 

program procedure guidelines relative to the permanent 
art collection at the Airport. 

ii. To oversee the execution of the art acquisition 

component of the Airport Commission's Domestic 
Terminal Redevelopment Plan and applicable five-year 
capital plans, and to assist in updating such plans or 
undertake the creation of a new art master plan as 
necessary: 

• To review and approve planning objectives. 

• To review drafts of art master planning documents 
and comment as necessary. 

• To present and support adoption of all of the above 
to the Airport and Art Commissions. 

iii. To oversee the commissioning of new artworks: 

• To review and approve recommended locations for 
artwork installations. 

• To review and approve project guidelines and 
budget. 



• Review selection panel recommendations and 
recommend approval to respective commissions. 

• Review and approve artist proposals. 

• To promote and support Committee 
recommendations to Arts and Airport Commissions. 

iv. To provide ongoing stewardship of the Airport 

collection, including but not limited to: 

• Ongoing evaluation of the collection. 

• Review and approval of recommendations regarding works to be 
de-accessioned and/or re-sited. 

d. AASC Meeting Agenda and Minutes : The Arts Commission will 
provide the Airport Commission Secretary with copies of all AASC 
meeting agendas and minutes. 

IV. Selection/Commissioning and De-accessioning of Artwork 

A. Artist/Artwork Selection 

The selection of artists and/or artwork will be carried out in accordance with the 
Art Commission's Policies and Guidelines for the Civic Art Collection. 

B. Artist Selection Panel Representation 

In accordance with the Arts Commission's guidelines, the Arts Commission shall 
appoint all guest members of artist selection panels. Selection panels for Airport 
projects shall be comprised of the following voting members: 

• 1 member representing the Airport from the Airport Art Steering 
Committee. 

• 1 member representing the Arts Commission. 

• Up to 3 guest arts professionals. 

• At the discretion of the Arts Commission, 1 member of the project 
architectural team may be appointed. 

C. Review and Approval of Selected Artists, Art Proposals, Direct Art 
Purchases, and Locations for Artwork 

1. Artist Selection 

Artists recommended by Selection Panels for design contracts will be 
submitted to the Arts Commission for approval. 

2. Artists' Project Proposals 

Artists' project proposals will be reviewed and approved by the AASC 
prior to being submitted to the Arts Commissions for similar approval. 
At the completion of design development, proposals will be submitted to 
the Airport Commission for final approval prior to the Arts Commission 
commissioning fabrication of the artwork. 

3. Approval of Direct Purchase of Artwork 



All artwork proposed for acquisition through direct purchase for the 
Airport will be reviewed and approved by the AASC prior to being 
submitted to the Airport and Arts Commissions for approval. 

Proposed Gifts 

a. Proposed gifts of artwork to the Airport will be considered in 

accordance with the Arts Commissions' Gift Policy, incorporated in 
its Policies and Guidelines for the Civic Art Collection. In 
accordance with those policies, these special conditions shall apply 
for gifts of art proposed for the Airport: 

• The proposed artwork should be within the focus of the Airport's 
collection, which is defined as a collection of contemporary fine 
art (1960 to present) by artists of recognized reputation. The 
collection emphasis is on the representation of Bay Area artists. 

• Priorities for acquisition, as defined in the Assessment and 
Recommendations Report (1995) prepared by Katherine Holland 
and Karen Tsujimoto (or any updated or subsequent assessment 
evaluation approved by the AASC and the Arts Commission) 
shall apply when considering the acceptance of gifts for the 
collection at the Airport. 



• 



Special care shall be given to determining whether or not there is 
an appropriate site for installation of the artwork and whether or 
not the artwork can be maintained within the Airport 
environment and within available resources. 

b. The AASC will review all proposals for gifts of art to be sited at the 
Airport and make a recommendation to either accept or decline the 
gift to the Visual Arts Committee of the Arts Commission. If the 
Visual Arts Committee recommends acceptance of the gift, the 
proposal will be submitted to the Airport Commission for approval 
prior to the item being submitted to the full Arts Commission for 
acceptance by Resolution. 

5. Site Approval 

Proposed sites for new acquisitions shall be submitted to the AASC, the 
Arts Commission, and the Airport's Design Review Committee for 
approval. 

6. Final Acceptance 

The Arts Commission will review and approve completed and/or 
installed art prior to final acceptance of the artwork into the City's Civic 
Art Collection. 

D. Removal, Relocation and/or De-accessioning of Artwork 

1. Airport Remodeling or Operational Changes Requiring Relocation 

or Storage of Artwork. 









Airport employees involved in planning or design shall initiate early 
contact with the Airport Staff Liaison to ensure proper coordination with 
the Arts Commission for the removal and relocation of artwork. 
Proposed remodeling that will require the removal of major artworks, 
impair the visibility of the artwork, or otherwise affect the relationship of 
the artwork to the site, will first be submitted to the AASC for review 
and recommendation prior to being submitted to the Arts Commission 
for approval. The Arts Commission will make a good faith effort to 
respond to a request by the Airport to relocate artwork in a timely 
manner. 

Most relocation and/or storage of artwork necessitated by Airport 
remodeling will be handled on an Airport/ Arts Commission staff level, 
and executed by the Airport Museums staff as part of routine 
maintenance. 

2. Permanent Removal, Alteration, Destruction and/or De-accessioning 
of Artwork 

Permanent removal, alteration, destruction or de-accessioning of artwork 
will be reviewed and approved by the AASC, prior to submission to the 
Arts Commission in accordance with Section 7, Removal, Alteration, 
Destruction and De-accessioning Policies and Procedures of the Arts 
Commission's Policies and Guidelines for the Civic Art Collection, and 
in accordance with the relevant sections of the City Charter, 
Administrative Code, and state and federal law. 

3. Approval of Sites for Relocated Artwork 

The Arts Commission shall submit proposed relocation sites for 
displaced artwork to the Airport's Design Review Committee prior to 
proceeding with relocation. Relocation of major artwork, where the 
removal or relocation will have a significant impact on either the artwork 
or the new proposed site will also be submitted to the AASC for its 
review and recommendation. 

4. Cost of Art Removal, Relocation and Storage 

The expense of removal, transporting, relocating and/or storing artwork, 
or any other related expenses, including Arts Commission administrative 
costs incurred as a result of Airport remodeling that necessitates the 
removal of artwork, will be borne by the Airport and will be incorporated 
in the Airport's Capital Plan. The Arts Commission shall submit to the 
Airport a written request with copies of documentation detailing the costs 
to be reimbursed. 

Maintenance 

A. Types of Maintenance 

There are three major types of maintenance needs for the art collection at the 
Airport: 

1. Repair, Replacement, or Improvement of Artwork's Installation: 

This includes repair or replacement of cases, framing, installation barriers, etc. 



These improvements will be made by Airport staff and funded through the 
Airport's facilities maintenance budget. The Airport staff will get the approval of 
the Arts Commission prior to making any repairs or replacements of cases, 
framing or installation that changes or differs from the original. 

2. Routine Maintenance: This includes dusting of artwork and Plexiglas 
cases, (including overhead artwork requiring the use of a mechanical lift to 
reach), cleaning glass barriers and the floor behind the barriers, changing light 
bulbs, and other tasks that require appropriate education, experience and/or 
technical skill, but do not require the services of a fine art conservator, the 
original artist, or the specialized service of another outside contractor. This work 
will be managed and preformed by Airport staff and funded through the Airport's 
facilities maintenance and operating budget. The Airport Commission will 
ensure that all personnel performing maintenance on the Artwork are qualified 
for the level of work being performed. 

3. Storage: This includes long- and short-term storage for artworks 
removed from display due to Airport remodeling or other reasons. The Airport 
will provide storage for artworks in its collection without charge to the Arts 
Commission. 

4. Major Cleaning, Repair or Conservation: This is work requiring 
specialized equipment and/or expertise; professional inspection of artwork to 
determine when maintenance or conservation is necessary or work requiring 
contact with the artist. This work will be managed by the Arts Commission and 
will be included in an annual budget request to be submitted by the Arts ■ 
Commission to the Airport through the Airport Staff Liaison by October 1 of 
each fiscal year. A separate memorandum of understanding for the work order 
will executed for each fiscal year. 

B. Maintenance Responsibilities and Procedures 

1. Maintenance Plan, Inspection and Reporting: The Arts Commission 
will conduct a formal inspection of the collection on an annual basis. The report 
from this inspection will identify ongoing maintenance needs as well as 
maintenance and conservation projects. The Arts Commission and Airport staff 
will develop an annual maintenance plan that will be the basis for the annual 
budget request submitted to the Airport Commission through the Airport Staff 
Liaison by October 1 of each fiscal year. 

2. Daily Maintenance: Airport staff will oversee the daily maintenance of 
the Collection and will follow through with the maintenance as provided in 
Sections V.A.I and 2 above. Any larger problem with the Artwork will be 
brought to the Art Commission's attention as soon as it is identified, in order to 
be addressed as provided in Section V.A.4 above. 

3. Records: All pertinent records, artist files, condition reports, 
maintenance records and conservation reports will be kept by the Arts 
Commission. Copies of these documents will be provided to the Airport 
Commission upon request. 



4. Vendor Contracts: The Airport and Arts Commission will contract 
directly with vendors for repair, replacement, cleaning, maintenance or 
improvement of artwork as-needed. 

5. Notification: 

a. The Arts Commission will notify the Airport Staff Liaison, 
Airport Duty Manager and, in the case where work is scheduled 
as part of Airport construction, the Project Manager, in advance 
of scheduling any site work such as installation, removal, 
relocation and/or maintenance of art. 

b. The Airport Staff Liaison will assist the Arts Commission as 
needed in notifying the necessary department(s) or personnel at 
the Airport of any work scheduled by the Arts Commission. 

c. The Airport Staff Liaison is responsible for notifying the Arts 
Commission of any damage, problems, missing plaques, etc. 
associated with the Airport collection. 



10 



IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Airport Commission and the Arts Commission have each 
caused this Memorandum of Understanding to be executed by their duly authorized 
representatives as of the dates set forth below. 



Date 



John L. Martin 
Airport Director 




Date 



Luis Cancel 

Director of Cultural Affairs 







11 






sfac: June 18, 2008 Page 1 of 4 



San Francisco Arts Commission 

TEXT ONLY: 

PRINT: 

1 

TEXT SIZE: 

m 

June 18, 2008 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, June 18, 2008 

3:00 p.m. DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 

JUN 1 6 2008 

Agenda 

, „ SAN FRANCISCO 

1. Consent _, ,„,, ,_ , ,__ . _. , 

r PUBLIC LIBRARY 

1. Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with Thomas Swan 
Sign Inc. in an amount not to exceed $13,000 to store, transport and install twenty-seven 
porcelain enamel photographic panels by artist Catherine Wagner on a natatorium wall of the 
Sava Pool facility at Larsen Park. 



r/°F 



2. Motion to approve a series of seven murals on roll down metal gates in front of the following 
businesses along the 24th Street corridor; La Espiga De Oro, Lo Cost Meats, Casa Lucas Market 
and Mani Vanh Thai Restaurant. Lead artists Eli Lippert, Fred Alvarado and Catalina Gonzalez will 
work with youth from the Urban Youth Arts Program and the Mission Girls Mural Project. Painting 
will commence in early July, 2008 and be complete by late August, 2008. 

2. Gallery - 155 Grove Street exhibition 

Dana Hemenway 

Presentation on the next 155 Grove Street installation by artist Jacqueline Gordon. 

Motion: Motion to approve artist honorarium in the amount of $500 for artist Jacqueline Gordon 
for her installation at 155 Grove Street to be installed July 18, 2009. 

I 

3. Gallery - City Hall exhibition 

Dana Hemenway 

Presentation on the next City Hall exhibition, titled 18 Months, in collaboration with the local arts 
organizations PhotoAlliance. 

4. San Francisco International Airport 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation on the revised proposal by artist Clare Rojas for boarding area G gate room wall at 
the San Francisco International Airport. 



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sfac: June 18, 2008 Page 2 of 4 



Motion: Motion to approve the revised proposal by Clare Rojas for boarding area G gate room 
wall at the San Francisco International Airport, which includes a faux molding and picture hanging 
hook. 

5. San Francisco International Airport - Terminal Two 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation on the public art program plan for Terminal Two of the San Francisco International 
Airport. 

Motion: Motion to approve the public art program plan for Terminal Two of the San Francisco 
International Airport. 

6. San Francisco International Airport - Secure Connector 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation on the three proposals by artists Linda Beaumont, Stephen Galloway, and Bob Zoell 
for the secure connector at the San Francisco International Airport. 

Motion: Motion to approve the selection panel's recommendation of the proposal of either Linda 
Beaumont, Stephen Galloway, or Bob Zoell for the secure connector at San Francisco 
International Airport, and authorization for the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into an 
agreement with the selected artist for up to $200,000 to design, fabricate and transport their 
artwork for the Airport, pending Airport Commission approval of the design. 

7. San Francisco General Hospital 

Susan Pontious 
Staff report 

Presentation on the public art program plan for San Francisco General Hospital. 

Motion: Motion to approve the public art program plan for General Hospital. 

8. Art on Market Street Program 

Judy Moran 
Staff report 

Presentation of artwork proposals for the Art on Market Street 2008/2009 Program. 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with one or 
more of the artists Jaime Cortez, Kota Ezawa or the artist team of Brianna Miller and Thien Pham 
for the development and implementation of a kiosk poster project with auxiliary programming for 
the Art on Market Street 2008/2009 Program for a contract amount not to exceed $18,000 for 
each selected artist. 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with the artist 
team Rebar for the development and implementation of a temporary art project for the Art on 
Market Street 2008/2009 Program for a contract amount not to exceed $25,000. 

9. Central Subway 

Judy Moran 



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sfac: June 1 8, 2008 Page 3 of 4 



Update of project artist selection and public outreach process. 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract for an amount 
not to exceed $10,000 with consultant Francis Wong to provide community outreach services for 
the Central Subway Public Art Program. 

10. Broadway Streetscape 

Tonia Macneil 
Staff report 

Presentation of the final template for the sidewalk text portion of Brian Goggin's Language of the 
Birds. 

Motion: Motion to approve final template for the text installation at Broadway Plaza for artist 
Brian Goggin's Language of the Birds. 

11. Installation Design for Whales Sculpture at CCSF 

Allison Cummings 
Staff report 

Report on the proposed conceptual plan for the installation of Robert Howard's Whales sculpture 
at the Ocean campus of City College San Francisco. 

Motion: Motion to approve the design in concept by RHAA Landscape Architects for the 
installation of Robert Howard's Whales sculpture at the Ocean Campus of City College San 
Francisco. 

12. New Business 

13. Old Business 

14. Adjournment 



MC 6/12/2008 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts Commission office, 25 
Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during regular business hours. INFO: Mary 
Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic devices are 
prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the removal from the meeting of 
any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell phone, pager, or other similar sound-producing 
electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or administrative action 
may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San Francisco Campaign and Governmental 
Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register and report lobbying activity. For more information 
about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 



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sfac: June 1 8, 2008 Page 4 of 4 



Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 
http://www.sfgov.org/ethics. 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. Commissions, 
boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct the people's business. This 
ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the people and that City operations are open 
to the people's review. For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report 
a violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine 
Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by 
phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at sotf@sfgov.org. 

Citizens interested in obtaining a free copy of the Sunshine Ordinance can request a copy from Mr. 
Darby or by printing Chapter 67 of the San Francisco Administrative Code on the Internet, 
http://www.sfgov.org/sunshine/. 






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Preclta Eyes Mural Arts Center 

Mission Girls Mural Project 
Project leader: Catalina Gonzalez 

Two Murals measuring 8.5'x 25' each. 

Image 1. 
Theme: Thailand 

Images: Temple/spirit house, a Thailand Flag flying in the wind, ornate Spirit House 
with chariot horse Ryder running through a flower Two female cultural dancers one 
stares looking out to viewer the other looks to the side. A male dancer with a Thailand 
mask is dancing with map of Thailand behind him a local tiger looks through the map. 

Image #2 

Theme: Thailand 

Images: USA breaks borders represented by chains and hands, immigrants they are like 
us from a tropical landscape of beautiful waters and green grasses sandy beaches with 
palm trees blowing in the wind. From Melds of rice the local farmers cultivate the earth 
and make offerings to the spirit house an image of a local flower behind the spirit house. 
Elephants roam the land with local bird riders viewing the green water and large rock 
formations as they travel across the land. 



Casa Lucas Market Roll Down, 

This mural was designed by students of the Precita Eyes Urban Youth Arts program. The 
Design is based on the service that Casa Lucas provides as a produce market and the 
hope for a sustainable lifestyle. On the far left of the design you see a farmer struggling 
with mechanical arms that spring forth from a giant yellow tractor. The farmer is 
struggling with technology that will either help or hurt his livelihood. The mechanical 
arms coiled in vines come from a defunct tractor that acts as a makeshift vegetable 
garden. Next to the tractor is a person working the land in his back yard. A backyard 
filled with fruits, vegetables, a hen, and a scarecrow. The urban fanner's head is 
exploding with the idea of eating healthy produce. 



Lo Cost Meats Roll Down 

Being a meat market it was the idea of the students of Precita Eyes Urban Youth Arts 
Program to create an animal heaven in respect of the animals and food that our 
community strives off of. This depiction of a cow, a pig, a chicken and a fish, each one 
representing a staple meat in our diets is set in the clouds and includes a greek style 
facade and pedastools honoring each animal and to create a more heavenly fell overall. 



La Despiga De Oro Roll Down 

This mural for the restaurant La Despiga De Oro was created to incorporate the roots of 
the main ingredient used in their food, maiz. To show this the Urban Youth Arts 
Program students have created a corn field with a giant com plant in the front, with the 
sun growing out of the top of the com plant to represent literally "la despiga de oro" 
which is the tip of the plant where the com appears like gold. Next to the field is a giant 
eagle, which is also a prominent aspect of laitno and mission culture and is a sign of 
strength. 






Date: 6/10/08 

To: Visual Arts Committee 

From: Susan Pontious 

Re: General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 

The plan for the public art program at General Hospital has been further developed based 
on input from the VAC at the June meeting, and further meetings with both the project 
architects and Kathy Jung, the project manager from the hospital. The attached plan 
describes project areas and budgets. While I would expect that there will be further 
refinement of the project descriptions and budgets as the program develops, I am seeking 
general approval of the plan so that we can move forward with advertising the 
opportunities and identifying a qualified artist pool for these projects. 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 

Susan Pontious 6/10/08 

Project Description: 

The project involves building a new building on the west lawn of the existing SFGH campus. 
The new facility will house 284 patient beds, as well as surgical and other acute care functions. 
The building is nine stories, with two basement stories and seven stories above ground. 

The building design by Fong and Chan Architects features a circular formed building that sets on 
a three story rectangular base (two stories are sub-grade). Patient rooms are located around the 
perimeter of floors 2-7, with nursing and other functions located in the interior of the building. 
Due to the dual impact of the constraints of both the site and the budget, the building is tightly 
packed with its programmatic requirements, and provides limited opportunities in the form of un- 
programmed space. 

Project Budget: 

According to Ron Alameida, project manager, the construction cost of the building is estimated to 
be @353,0O0,O00 in 2007 dollars. He has estimated art enrichment based on 2% to be 
$5,500,000. Using this figure, we would apply our budget percentages as follows 

Design, Fabrication and Installation of Artwork: $5,365,600 

Maintenance: $ 282,400 

Administration: $1,412,000 

Total: $7,060,000 

Schedule: 

To meet the State mandate, the building must open by 2013, but the city is trying to negotiate a 
two year extension to that date. The bond measure is scheduled to go to the voters November, 
2008, by which time Design Development of the project is scheduled to be complete. This 
aggressive timeline forces the Arts Commission to make some decisions very quickly regarding 
the art program, particularly where we want artists to have any direct involvement with the design 
process, or where the inclusion of artwork will require structural reinforcement. It should be 
noted that even hanging 2-dimensional art like paintings or prints requires forethought as 
OSHPD, the state regulatory agency, requires structural reinforcement for hanging anything 
heavier than 20 lbs. on the wall. 

According to the current building design schedule, the following dates dictate the schedule that 
our planning and commissioning process must parallel: 

Arts Commission Civic Design Approval, Phase 2 (Design Development): 5/29/08 

Arts Commission Civic Design Approval Phase 3 (Construction Documents) 12/1 1/08 

Design Development, Interior Finishes Elements: 5/22/08-7/10/08 

Finalize Design Development: 10/23/08 

Structural Package Development: 1 0/3 1 /07- 1 2/30/09 

Building Package Development: 1 1 /20/08- 1 0/22/09) 

Construction bid period: 2/23/1 1-4/6/1 1 

Construction: 4/6/1 1 -7/9/14 

Building opening: 12/31/14 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 
6/10/2008 



Project Goals: 

1 Develop an art program for the acquisition of new work that serves patients, 
visitors and staff by enhancing the therapeutic environment and results in an art 
collection that meets the highest aesthetic standards. 

2 Become a model by using research, experience, and examples from the field to 
inform innovative and creative responses for developing an art program in a 
hospital setting. 

3 Evaluate condition and appropriateness existing GH collection, and repair, re- 
frame works for reinstallation. Refresh the collection throughout the campus 
with new works as budget allows. 

Approach: 

The experience of an acute care hospital is one that finds both patients and their families at their 
most vulnerable and research indicates that beyond the aesthetic and cultural benefits art usually 
provides, that a carefully thought out art program can be enormously effective in supporting 
patients, families and hospital staff. Informed by experience and research in the field, we will be 
looking for artwork that evokes the beauty and serenity of the natural world through the use of 
materials, form, light and imagery. 

Knowing that art can have such direct impact on the health and well being of the hospital users 
has shaped what I believe is the Commission's mission for the art program at the hospital. I 
would emphasize that there is no formula to be followed here, and the adoption of some very 
literal art prescription would result in a collection that was dead on arrival. Rather we must use 
the research, examples and experience from the field to focus and prioritize efforts, and to inform 
and inspire our choices. 

Summary of Art Opportunities in New Building and Landscape: 

Interior: 

• Main Entry Lobby (single artist or artist team): Artist(s) could create an integrated visual 
whole in the two story lobby area. Sites of special opportunity include the 2 story atrium 
and wall behind the reception desk, terrazzo floor, and a. backlit glass wall. A walkway 
on the 2 nd floor allows an overhead view of the space, and the railing provides another art 
opportunity. 

• Glass or tile mosaic on 35' wall of 2 nd Fl. Elevator lobby: An artwork here provides an 
entry statement to the maternity and pediatric floor. 

• Backlit curved glass wall at exit of elevator lobbies on floors 3-7: and exterior court glass 
walls on floors 3-7:The architectural design provides a number of opportunities for the 
integrated use of art glass, which is unsurpassed as a medium for providing an exquisite 
quality of light and color. Artists can use of both traditional and modern techniques for 
virtually unlimited expression of imagery and/or texture. The potential use of the glass in 
the light wells that penetrate the six patient floors, as well an interior backlit glass wall at 
the entrance of the patient floors provides an opportunity for both a unified visual theme, 
as well as distinctive identity for each floor. The additional opportunities provided by the 
backlit glass wall in the lobby, glass railing and connector bridge, and glass windows in 
the interior stairwells make the use of glass by artists a unifying creative theme for the 
building 

• Flooring design marking each quadrant on floors 2-7: There is little opportunity to 
provide artwork in the patient room areas, but the linoleum. flooring provides an 
opportunity to give a visual identity to each nursing quadrant. 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 
6/10/2008 



Exterior: 



Glass Bridge to existing hospital: This major connector provides an opportunity for glass 
that could have a visual impact both during the day and at night. 
Purchased artwork for admitting areas, waiting areas, consultation rooms, and other 
locations: 
Q 

• Sculpture for center of vehicular turn around at main entry: This is an opportunity to 
create a signature piece marking the entry of the hospital. 

• 7 lh floor Roof garden sculptures: one or two sculptures would provide focal points to this 
area. 

• Plaza between new and existing building (possibly stairwell windows, sculpture, paving, 
seating): There are a number of opportunities here, including visually connecting with 
the entry lobby. 

• Potrero St. entry , walkway on south side of building; (entry sculpture, retaining wall 
outside of surgery waiting room) 

• Pocket garden (s) not budgeted at this time. 
Existing Collection and Other Campus Buildings: 
Repair, reframe, re-fresh existing collection: 



Estimated Budget for Each Project Area: 


Entry Lobby; floor, 
2-story wall, glass 
wall 


$360,700 




2nd floor elevator 
lobby wall mosaic 


$138,800 




Curved glass; fl. 3-7 


$125,000 




Exterior courtyard 
glass (14 walls) 


$729,000 




Floor design; Floors 
2, 4-7 


$165,000 




Glass bridge to old 
building 


$200,000 




purchased 2-D for 
waiting rooms, etc.; 
est. 123 artworks, 
framed, installed @ 
$5K ea. 


$615,000 










Entry sculpture 


$1,000,000 




Roof garden 
sculpture 


$200,000 




Plaza 


$500,000 




Potrero St. entry, 
side walkway 


$325,000 




Repair, refresh 
existing collection 


$470,540 




Total Budgeted: 


$4,829,040 




Contingency 


$536,560 




Project total: 


$5,365,600 




Total AE 


$5,365,600 




Balance: 


$0 








General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 
6/ 1 0/2008 






Summary of Research from the Field: 

Evidence Based Criteria: 

The current practice in commissioning and purchasing art for hospitals is strongly influenced by 
what is referred to in the hospital field as evidence-based design, which is defined as the 
purposeful and methodical attempt to make decisions using the best available research. 

There have been several studies using evidence-based design to measure the impact of art on the 
clinical and behavioral outcomes of patients in hospital settings. The most significant of these 
studies was conducted in Sweden by Roger Ulrich, who is currently a fellow at the Center for 
Health Systems and Design at Texas A&M University. In this study, he found that heart surgery 
patients in an ICU who were shown scenes of nature with water, trees, and high depth of field 
showed less anxiety, suffered less intense pain, and required lower strength medication than those 
who were shown abstract scenes or no image at all. The findings and subsequent 
recommendations Roger Ulrich constitute the basis of what is called "evidence based artwork," a 
concept that has been largely adopted throughout the healthcare industry. 

The consulting firm American Art Resources implemented an evidence-based art program in 
2002 at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and conducted an evaluation of the 
program in 2007. The evaluation found that the artwork not only created a less stressful 
environment for the patients and staff but also helped create a more favorable and nurturing 
image of the hospital for visitors. Evidence-based design factors in the happiness and well-being 
of the staff and visitors as well as the patients. There have been other subsequent surveys done of 
patient and visitor preferences and experience of hospital art conducted by AAR and the firm's 
practice, along wit the writings and national speaking engagements of its principals seem to have 
largely defined the practice of evidence based art. 

While empirical studies are limited (and I have been unable to find any peer evaluation of the 
validity of their methodology), they are nonetheless convincing enough to be seen as an indicator 
of best practice in the field. In the June/July 2006 issue of Healthcare Building Ideas, a trade 
journal that serves the design, construction and maintenance professionals, Jac k Reichenthal, 
President of Hospital CEO Forum, writes: ". . .research reveals that the investment made in art to 
create a therapeutic environment yields substantial benefits. The research definitively proves 
that patients in recovery from surgery, viewing specific kinds of images, experience reduced 
stress, lower blood pressure, less discomfort, fewer complications, required less pain medication 
and experience speedier recoveries.. .Research reveals that art doesn't just hang on the walls. 
But who would have thought that it could have such an impact?" 

What is Evidence Based Art? 

Based on the results of their research, Ulrich and Gilpin summarize their recommendations in 

their book, Putting Patients First. Their top suggestions include the following: 

• Representational landscapes depicted in warmer seasons, with visual depth and open 
foreground. Views with low hills and distant mountains are also recommended. 

• Waterscapes (calm, non-turbulent) 

• Calm weather 

• Flowers (familiar, healthy, fresh and in natural settings with open foreground) 

• Visual Depth with openness in the immediate foreground 

• Figurative art (depicting emotionally positive faces, diverse and leisurely in nature.) 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 
6/10/2008 



Research cited in the book, Healing Gardens (Barnes/Marcus), makes the argument for the 
positive therapeutic effect of viewing nature. According to this research, artworks that refer to 
the natural world can be as effective as real landscape in helping hospitalized patients. 

It is noted that there is little known (by way of empirical research) on art for special populations, 
or different ethnicities.) 

Other ideas: 



In a white paper produced for Harborview Medical Center by the King County Public Art 
Program, additional ideas were recommended for consideration in designing a hospital 
environment. These included: 

• Use of light as inspiration 

• Way-finding, both as landmark and creation of more intimate and private experiences. 

• Use of "life stories;" noting that the construction of narratives is what allows us to find 
our way through life and to give its most difficult moments a sense of meaning. In this 
category the King County Public Art Program also sites Harborview' s collection of art 
that focuses on ethnic heritage, acknowledging that in times of trouble a sense of one's 
culture is often an anchor that provides a powerful spiritual balm. 

• The beauty of Science; these are artworks that celebrate the scientific passion for 
humanitarian discovery. An example is Cliff Garten's light fixtures that use the beauty of 
molecular biology as a source of imagery. 

General Hospital Staff Recommendations : 

According to the hospital's project manager, Kathy Jung, the hospital staff sees the art program 
developed for the hospital's Mental Health Rehabilitation Facility (MHRF) as a possible model 
for the new program for GH. This program, developed by SFAC in 1990, features the following: 

• Collection of two-dimensional artwork depicting reality based images of landscapes, still 
lifes, and positive images of different ethnic groups, interpersonal interaction, and 
positive activities. This collection, in both the artists and images selected directly reflects 
the population of the MHRF clients. 

• Landscape and waterscape murals on the support columns of the dayrooms that bring 
nature indoors and de-materialize the heavy columns (David Gordon and Hilda Shum) 

• An artist-designed gazebo with seating in the horticulture therapy area (George Gonzales. 

• Large lobby mural depicting games of the world (Hilda Shum). 

• Outdoor sculpture depicting a diving fish by Hilda Shum; (this artwork is somewhat 
controversial because some Asian patients find the imagery as one of bad luck) 

• Tile mural designed an executed by Johanna Poethig in conjunction with MHRF patients. 

Hospital staff also expressed a desire for more architecturally integrated artworks. 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 
6/10/2008 



General Hospital Catalogue of Art Opportunities: 

INTERIOR 

Basement 2 (Radiology; Morgue) 

Waiting Rm. (1) 

Staff Lounge/conference rooms (3). 

Radiology, i.e. X-ray, CT -Scan, Ultrasound, x-ray (9) 

Basement 1 (Surgery) 

Surgery Waiting/Reception (1) 
Consultation Rooms (2)* 
Staff lounge (1) 

First Floor (Emergency) 

Admitting and Registration areas (2) 
Pediatric waiting (1) 
Main Lobby (atrium/vertical wall) 
Staff Lounge (2) 

Conference/Consultation Rooms (2) 
Consult./quiet Rm. (1)* 

2 nd Floor (Women's & Children) 

Nurse's stations (4) 

Floor 

Patient rooms (35; 8 pediatric) 

Bridge to existing Hospital 

Waiting Room (1) 

Family Room (1) 

Parent's lounge (1) 

Conference Rooms (2) 

Social Worker (1) 

PlayRm. (1) 

3 rd Floor (ICU) 

Nurse's stations (8) 

Floor 

Patient rooms (38) 

Exterior Courts (2) 

Waiting Rooms (2) 

Consultation Rooms (2) 

Staff Lounge (I) 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 
6/10/2008 



4 th Floor (Step-down) 

Nurse's Stations (6) 

Floor 

Patient Rooms(45) 

Exterior Light Court (2) 

Waiting/multi-purpose Rms. (3) 

Consultation Rooms/Social Worker (3) 

Staff lounge/conference (2) 

5 th Floor (Medical/Surgery/jail unit) 

Nurse's Stations (4) 

Floor 

Patient Rooms (45 

Exterior Light Courts (4) 

Waiting/multi-purpose Rm (2) 

Consultation rooms/Social Worker (5) 

Visiting/Interview Rooms (4) 

Staff lounge/conference (3) 

Glass bridge 

6 th Floor (Medical/Surgery) 

Nurse's stations (4) 

Floor 

Patient Rooms (45) 

Exterior Light Courts 

Waiting/multipurpose Rms. (2) * 

Consultation/social worker (3) 

Staff lounge/conference room (3) 

7 th Floor (Acute Care for Elderly/ Foorf Garden/ Conference Ceter 

Nurse's stations (3) 

Floor 

Patient Rooms (22) 

Waiting/multi-purpose rms. (2) 

Consultation/Social Worker (2) 

Staff Lounges/conference rooms (2) 

Conference center * 

Roof Garden * 

EXTERIOR 

Plaza between old and new buildings 

Center of turn around at entrance 

Walkway up south side of building; retaining wall outside of surgery waiting room 

Stair light well (visible from Potrero) 

Pocket park 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 
6/10/2008 



General Hospital 


Program 
Budget 


6/10/2008 








Received 


Accounts 
Receivable: 


Total AE Allocation: 


$7,060,000 


$100,000 


$6,960,000 


Admin: 


$1,412,000 






Maintenance: 


$282,400 






Art 


$5,365,600 







Basement 1 : Surgery 


Unit= 
number or 
sq. ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Waiting; Reception, 
lobby 


10 


$5,000 


$50,000 


included 


included 


$50,000 




Total Basement 1 














$50,000 






Basement 2: 
Radiology; Morgue 


Unit= 
number or 

sq.ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Waiting; entry 


10 


$5,000 


$50,000 


included 


included 


$50,000 




Radiology 
ceilings/walls 


7 


$5,000 


$35,000 


included 


included 


$35,000 




Total Basement 2 














$85,000 




First Floor: 
(Emergency; main 
admitting} 


Unit 

=numberor 

sq.ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Main Lobby 
















Terrazzo Floor (sq. 
ft) 


5000 


$30 


$150,000 


$30,000 


^ $40,000 


$220,000 




Backlit glass 


207 


$100 


$20,700 


$10,000 


$10,000 


$40,700 




Atrium piece 


1 


$100,000 


$100,000 


included 


included 


$100,000 




2-D artwork; 
admitting, hallway 


6 


$5,000 


$30,000 


included 


included 


$30,000 




Emergency 2-D 
artwork; waiting 


6 


$5,000 


$30,000 


included 


included 


$30,000 




Total 1 st Floor 














$420,700 


















2nd Floor: 
Maternity/pediatrics 


Unit= 

number or 
sq. ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Bridge to existing 
hospital 












$200,000 




Waiting rooms; other 
2-d 


10 


$5,000 


$50,000 


included 


included 


$50,000 




9" x 35' wall in front of 
elevators (8x20) 
mosaic 


160 


$680 


$108,800 


$20,000 


$10,000 


$138,800 




Nurses stations 4x240 
sq.ft. 


960 


$25 


$24,000 


$6,000 


3000 


$33,000 




Total 2nd Fl. 














$421,800 



















3rd. FL; ICU 


Unit= 
number or 
sq.ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Curved glass wall at 
entry 


90 


$200 


$18,000 


$7,000 


arch credit 


$25,000 




Exterior court 
windows 


2 


$50,000 


$100,000 


$20,000 


$5,000 


$125,000 




2-D art for waiting 
rms. 


14 


$5,000 


$70,000 


include. 


included 


$70,000 




Total 3rd Fl. 














$220,000 




4th Floor: Step down 


Unit= 
number or 
sq.ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Curved glass wall at 
entry 


90 


$200 


$18,000 


$7,000 


arch credit 


$25,000 




Exterior court 
windows 


2 


$50,000 


$100,000 


$20,000 


$5,000 


$125,000 




2-D art for waiting 
rms. 


18 


$5,000 


$90,000 


include. 


included 


$90,000 




Nurses stations 4x240 
sq. ft. 


960 


$25 


$24,000 


$6,000 


3000 


$33,000 




Total 4th Fl. 














$273,000 




5th Floor: 
Medical/Surgery/ Jail 


Unit= 

number or 
sq.ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Curved glass wall at 
entry 


90 


$200 


$18,000 


$7,000 


arch credit 


$25,000 




Exterior court 
windows 


4 


$35,000 


$140,000 


$28,000 


$5,000 


$173,000 




2-D art for waiting 
rms. 


18 


$5,000 


$90,000 


include. 


included 


$90,000 




Nurses stations 4x240 
sq. ft. 


960 


$25 


$24,000 


$6,000 


3000 


$33,000 




Total 5th Fl. 














$321,000 




6th Fl.: Medical 
Surgery 


Unit= 
number or 
sq.ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Curved glass wall at 
entry 


90 


$200 


$18,000 


$7,000 


arch credit 


$25,000 




Exterior court 
windows 


! 4 


$35,000 


$140,000 


$28,000 


$5,000 


$173,000 




2-D art for waiting 
rms. 


14 


$5,000 


$70,000 


include. 


included 


$70,000 




Nurses stations 4x240 
sq.ft. 


960 


$25 


$24,000 


$6,000 


3000 


$33,000 




Subtotal 6th Flo. 














$301,000 



Date: June 11,2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Judy Moran, Art on Market Street Project Manager 

Re: Art on Market Street 2008/2009 Program 



Three artist proposals for the Kiosk Poster Series will be presented to the Visual Arts 
Committee members, as summarized below. Additional details and images will be 
provided at the meeting. In addition, a proposal for a temporary Art on Market Street 
project by the artist group Rebar, will be presented at the meeting, and the artwork of 
artist America Meredith will be presented for consideration for development of a 
proposal. 

1. Jaime Cortez proposal: Maiden Voyage 

A series of posters depicting the adventures of one of the weeping maidens atop the 
ornate columns of the Palace of Fine Arts who has come to life. 

Poster # 1 : (sample provided at meeting) Maiden wakes up, jumps down and begins her 

journey into the 21 st century. 
Poster #2: Maiden walks to the Marina Green, stares in fascination at the people and 

activities around her. She is noticed but not remarked upon. 
Poster #3: Maiden explores the Mission District, serenaded by a trio of Norteno 

musicians. 
Poster #4: In the Castro District, she meets bearded and glitzy nuns, the Sisters of 

Perpetual Indulgence. 
Poster #5: Riding a Muni bus, she is fascinated by all the electronic devices that 

passengers are using. 
Poster #6: The maiden returns to her post at the Palace of Fine Arts. 

Auxiliary Programming: A poetry reading outdoors at the Palace of Fine Arts or an 
accordion fold book with drawings, photos of the maidens, historical information and 
poetic interpretations of the sculptures by poets and prose writers. 



2. Briana Miller and Thien Pham proposal: The Mighty Defender and the Unsung Hero 

The artists created a poster series styled as a comic that can be read in both directions, 
each direction telling a different story, based on San Francisco and using the bus lines. 
Text is only included in the first and sixth posters to allow for greater accessibility to 
pedestrians who don't speak or read English. (Samples of Posters #2 and #6 provided at 
the meeting, with sketches of all six posters.) 



Poster #1 : Love's Unsung Hero, begins with a couple sitting at a window, with a Mighty 

Defender costume on the wall. 
Poster #2 shows the couple at a bus stop, with the woman pulling away from the man. 
Poster #3 shows the woman on the bus pulling away from the man. 
Poster #4 shows the man in his Mighty Defender costume. 
Poster #5 shows the Mighty Defender interrupting a robbery at the Mint and tying the 

two villains to a telephone pole. 
Poster #6 is a traditional comic cover with the Mighty Defender, the woman, and the two 

villains. 

Viewing the series in reverse, from Poster #6 to Poster #1, the story can be read as 
beginning with the cover, then the robbery, then the Mighty Defender seeming to remove 
his costume, then waving to the woman seeming to arrive on the bus welcomed by the 
man, the couple seeming to pull together on the sidewalk, and finally the couple 
enjoying a meal together in the final poster. 

Auxiliary Programming: A comic book issue of the posters, t-shirts with whole 
illustrations or the logo, or comic book workshops. 



3. Kota Ezawa Proposal: Nothing Ever Happened, Except Here 

Reflecting Market Street as a historic site for political marches, the poster series is based 
on archival photographs with explanatory text documenting a demonstration by a left- 
wing workers' union in 1933 in Mossingen, a small town in southwest Germany where 
the artist grew up. In reaction to the appointment of Adolf Hitler as Chancellor of 
Germany, the leading unionist of the textile companies in Mossingen organized a 
citywide workers' strike and public demonstration with over 800 workers on the 
following day. This was the only town in Germany that organized a workers' strike 
against Hitler. (One poster image provided at meeting). 

Poster #1: The leaflet published by the workers' union that led to the strike. 

Poster #2: Pausa, a textile factory, whose workers were the first to strike. 

Poster #3: The high school gym where demonstrators gathered. 

Poster #4: Portrait of Jakob Stotz, a local glazier, who was identified as the leader of the 

strike. 
Poster #5: Procession of demonstrators marching through the village. 
Poster #6: Prison of Rottenburg where the arrested leaders were detained. 

Auxiliary Programming: An exhibition of the documentation of the Market Street kiosks 
with the posters on the street in Mossingen where the protestors marched. 



Date: June 12, 2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Tonia Macneil 

RE: Broadway Streetscape: Final design of text for installation on the Broadway Plaza. 



Brian Goggin has prepared the final template of the text to be sandblasted into the new 
Broadway Plaza. Staff has reviewed the template and recommends approval as is. Since 
Commissioners had previously voiced questions as to the legibility and accuracy of the text and 
placement of certain words in relation to others we are requesting a final review and approval. 

This is the last opportunity to review the template before it is transformed into a solid stencil for 
use in sandblasting the letters into the sidewalk. 



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Date: June 10, 2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Allison Cummings 

Re: Proposed Plan for the Installation of Robert Howard's Whales sculpture at the 
Ocean Campus of City College of San Francisco 

City College of San Francisco (CCSF) is in the preliminary stages of planning the 
installation of Robert Howard's Whales fountain at its Ocean Campus. The sculpture, 
which was created for the Golden Gate International Exposition on Treasure Island and 
was displayed for many years in front of the Academy of Sciences, was relocated in 2004 
to CCSF to make way for the Academy's new facility. 

During the move, the sculpture was severely damaged, and re-installation of the work 
will require significant conservation treatment. Arts Commission staff are currently 
pursuing restitution with the Academy of Sciences. 

CCSF retained Royston Hanamoto Alley & Abey Landscape Architects to design the site 
plan. Attached herein are several images of their plan to install the Whales as a focal 
point at the main entrance to the campus off Phelan Avenue. The design places the 
sculpture at the foot of a grand staircase leading to the Science Hall, and is part of a 
larger plan to build a Performing Arts Complex directly across the street. 

The plan calls for the relocation of Beniamo Bufano's St. Francis of the Guns to another 
location on campus which has yet to be found and approved. 

CCSF staff has taken a lead roll in fundraising efforts, developing web pages and a press 
release. There is support in concept from the CCSF Board of Directors, as well as some 
funds for the project. However the Arts Commission has no funds to contribute at this 
time, and is investigating possible sources. 

Staff Recommendation : Staff recommends approval of the installation design in concept. 




CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Robert Howard Whale Fountain Relocation 

May 2008 



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VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, June 18.2008 

3:00 p.m. 

25 Win Ness Avenue, Suile 70 

Meeting Cancelled 



GOVERNMENT 
DOCUMENTS DEPT 

JUL -6 2010 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

7/6/2010 2:44 PM 



sfac: July 16, 2008 Page 1 of 5 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

LISTEN 
TEXT ON LY 
PRINT 

A 
A 
A 

July 16, 2008 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, July 16, 2008 07-1 5-03A11 : 01 R 

3:00 p.m. 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 



Agenda 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 
JUL 1 5 2008 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



1. Gallery - 155 Grove Street exhibition 

Meg Shiffler 

Presentation of an exhibition at Grove Street in collaboration with New Langton Arts 
and in response to the Slow Food conference (August 28 to September 1, 2008) 
located in the Civic Center Plaza. The installation will begin late August and continue 
through October 18, 2008. 

Motion: Motion to approve an artist honorarium to Jessie Sellinger in the amount of 
$1200 for his contribution to the installation at Grove Street to be installed on August 
24, 2008. 

2. Gallery - SFAC Gallery exhibition at 401 Van Ness 

Meg Shiffler 

Presentation of an exhibition of works at the SFAC Gallery organized by local artist 
Michael Zheng and a collective of Chinese artists living both in China and within the 
Diaspora. These primarily video and photography works comment on the social, 
economic, cultural and political landscapes of contemporary China and are bound by 
their tendencies toward absurdity and theatricality. The exhibition, as yet to be titled, 
will be at the main gallery from February 13 through April 18, 2009. 

Motion: Motion to approve an artist honorarium to Michael Zheng in the amount of 
$1000 for his organizational contribution to the main gallery exhibition to be installed 
on January 25, 2009. 

3. Installation Design for Whales Sculpture at CCSF 

Allison Cummings 
Staff report 



http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=84330 7/1 1/2008 



sfac: July 16, 2008 Page 2 of 5 



Report on the proposed conceptual plan for the installation of Robert Howard's Whales 
sculpture at the Ocean campus of City College San Francisco. 

Motion: Motion to approve the design in concept by RHAA Landscape Architects for the 
installation of Robert Howard's Whales sculpture at the Ocean Campus of City College 
San Francisco. 

4. San Francisco International Airport - Clare Rojas 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation of the revised proposal by artist Clare Rojas for boarding area G gate 

room wall at the San Francisco International Airport. 

Motion: Motion to approve the revised proposal by Clare Rojas for boarding area G 
gate room wall at the San Francisco International Airport, which includes a faux 
molding and picture hanging hook. 

5. San Francisco International Airport - Terminal Two 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation on the public art program plan for Terminal Two of the San Francisco 

International Airport. 

Motion: Motion to approve the public art program plan for Terminal Two of the San 
Francisco International Airport. 

Motion: Motion to approve the following pool of potential panelists for the San 
Francisco International Airport Terminal Two Artist Pool Selection Panel: Ann Alger, 
Director of Public Art Program for Phoenix Airport; Janet Bishop, Curator SFMOMA; 
Timothy Burgard, Chief Curator, De Young Museum; Susan Gray, Artist and Public Art 
Director, L.A. Redevelopment; Rene de Guzman, Chief Curator, Oakland Museum of 
California; Susan Harrison, Director of Art in Architecture for GSA, Washington D.C.; 
Kendal Henry, Public Art Administrator, N.Y.; Walter Hood, Landscape Architect and 
Artist; Mildred Howard, Artist; Arlan Huang, Artist; Larry Kirkland, Artist, Washington 
D.C.; Miwon Kwon, Art Dept. Faculty, UCLA; Lizzetta LeFalle-Collins, Independent 
Curator; Wang Po Shu, Artist; Renny Pritikin, Director of Richard L. Nelson Gallery, 
UCD; Mary Rubin, Public Art Administrator, San Jose; Richard Shaw, Artist; Hilda 
Shum, Artist; Meredith Tromble, Critic; Shelly Willis, Public Art Administrator, 
Sacramento; and Ruri Yampolsky, Seattle Arts Commission. 

6. San Francisco International Airport - Secure Connector 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation on the selection panel's recommendation of the proposal by artist Bob 

Zoell for the secure connector at the San Francisco International Airport. 

Motion: Motion to approve the selection panel's recommendation of the proposal by 



htl ,>://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=84330 7/1 1/2008 



sfac: July 16, 2008 Page 3 of 5 



artist Bob Zoell for the secure connector at San Francisco International Airport, and 
authorization for the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into an agreement with Bob 
Zoell for up to $200,000 to design, fabricate and transport their artwork for the Airport, 
pending Airport Commission approval of the design. 

7. San Francisco General Hospital 

Susan Pontious 
Staff report 

Presentation on the public art program plan for San Francisco General Hospital. 

Motion: Motion to approve the public art program plan for General Hospital. 

Motion: Motion to approve the following pool of potential panelists for the San 
Francisco General Hospital Artist Pool Selection Panel: Ann Alger, Director of Public Art 
Program for Phoenix Airport; Janet Bishop, Curator SFMOMA; Timothy Burgard, Chief 
Curator, De Young Museum; Susan Gray, Artist and Public Art Director, L.A. 
Redevelopment; Rene de Guzman, Chief Curator, Oakland Museum of California; Susan 
Harrison, Director of Art in Architecture for GSA, Washington D.C.; Kendal Henry, 
Public Art Administrator, N.Y.; Walter Hood, Landscape Architect and Artist; Mildred 
Howard, Artist; Arlan Huang, Artist; Larry Kirkland, Artist, Washington D.C.; Miwon 
Kwon, Art Dept. Faculty, UCLA; Lizzetta LeFalle-Collins, Independent Curator; Julio 
Morales, Artist and Co-Director of Queen's Nails; Wang Po Shu, Artist; Renny Pritikin, 
Director of Richard L. Nelson Gallery, UCD; Favianna Rodriguez, Artist; Mary Rubin, 
Public Art Administrator, San Jose; Richard Shaw, Artist; Hilda Shum, Artist; Meredith 
Tromble, Critic; Shelly Willis, Public Art Administrator, Sacramento; and Ruri 
Yampolsky, Seattle Arts Commission. 

8. Art on Market Street Program 

Judy Moran 
Staff report 

Presentation of artwork proposals for the Art on Market Street 2008/2009 Program. 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with 
one or more of the artists Jaime Cortez, Kota Ezawa or the artist team of Brianna Miller 
and Thien Pham for the development and implementation of a kiosk poster project with 
auxiliary programming for the Art on Market Street 2008/2009 Program for a contract 
amount not to exceed $18,000 for each selected artist. 

9. Central Subway 

Judy Moran 

Update on project artist selection and public outreach process. 



http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=84330 7/1 1/2008 



sfac: July 16, 2008 Page 4 of 5 



Motion: Motion to approve the following pool of potential panelists for the Central 
Subway Artist Pool Selection Panel: Jorge Pardo, Director, L.A. Metro Art; Courtney 
Fink, Director, Southern Exposure; Hung Liu, Artist; Jenifer Wofford, Artist; Fred 
Wasserman, Director of Programming, Contemporary Jewish Museum; Janet Bishop, 
Curator, SFMOMA; Elizabeth Thomas, Matrix Curator, Berkeley Art Museum; Lucinda 
Barnes, Chief Curator, Berkeley Art Museum; Suzette Min, Assoc Professor, UC Davis; 
Jens Hoffman, Phyllis Wattis Curator, CCA; Walter Hood, Architect; Rene de Guzman, 
Chief Curator, Oakland Art Museum; Hilda Shum, Artist; Julio Morales, Artist and Co- 
Director of Queen's Nails; Sandra Percival, Executive Director, New Langton Arts; Jim 
Melchert, Artist; and Marina MacDougal, Curator, 

L0. Branch Library Improvement Project 

Judy Moran 
Staff Report 

Presentation on the planning of public art projects for four new branch libraries as part 
of the Branch Library Improvement Project. 

Motion: Motion to approve the pooling of funds for the public art projects to be 
planned and developed for the four new branch libraries - Bayview/Anna E. Waden, 
Ortega, North Beach and Visitacion Valley - as part of the Branch Library Improvement 
Program. 

Motion: Motion to approve the following pool of potential panelists for the BLIP Artist 
Pool Selection Panel: Courtney Fink, Executive Director, Southern Exposure; Mark 
Thompson, Director, San Francisco State University Gallery; Carmelina Ponce De Leon, 
Board Member, Galeria de la Raza; Linda Raynsford, Artist; Reddy Lieb, Artist; Joyce 
Hsu, Artist; Elizabeth Thomas, Matrix Director, Berkeley Art Museum; Katherine Aoki 
Artist; Leo Bersamina, Artist; Sabina Chen, Executive Director, Chinese Culture Center; 
Kristen Zaremba, Project Manager, Oakland Public Art Program; and Rene de Guzman, 
Chief Curator, Oakland Museum. 

LI. Collections 

Carol Marie Daniels 

Report on the following three projects at Golden Gate Park: Portals of the Past, Francis 
Scott Key, and Cider Press Bucket. Report on the Crumpler Mural Restoration and the 
Embarcadero Historic Signage. 

L2. New Business 

Report on Transbay Terminal. 
13. Old Business 



http:// w vw.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=84330 7/11/2008 



sfac: July 16, 2008 



Page 5 of 5 



Report on projects at Academy of Sciences and Moscone Center West. 
L4. Adjournment 

MC 7/11/2008 
Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts 

Commission office, 25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during 

regular business hours. INFO: Mary Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration 

of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic 

devices are prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the 

removal from the meeting of any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell 

phone, pager, or other similar sound-producing electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or 

administrative action may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San 

Francisco Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to 

register and report lobbying activity. For more information about the Lobbyist 

Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 

Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 

http://www.sfgov.org / ethics . 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the 
public. Commissions, boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist 
to conduct the people's business. This ordinance assures that deliberations are 
conducted before the people and that City operations are open to the people's review. 
For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report a 
violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, 
Sunshine Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San 
Francisco CA 94102-4689; by phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by 
email at sotf@sfgov.org . 



http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=84330 



7/1 1/2008 



Date: June 10,2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Allison Cummings 

Re: Proposed Plan for the Installation of Robert Howard's Whales sculpture at the 
Ocean Campus of City College of San Francisco 

City College of San Francisco (CCSF) is in the preliminary stages of planning the 
installation of Robert Howard's Whales fountain at its Ocean Campus. The sculpture, 
which was created for the Golden Gate International Exposition on Treasure Island and 
was displayed for many years in front of the Academy of Sciences, was relocated in 2004 
to CCSF to make way for the Academy's new facility. 

During the move, the sculpture was severely damaged, and re-installation of the work 
will require significant conservation treatment. Arts Commission staff are currently 
pursuing restitution with the Academy of Sciences. 

CCSF retained Royston Hanamoto Alley & Abey Landscape Architects to design the site 
plan. Attached herein are several images of their plan to install the Whales as a focal 
point at the main entrance to the campus off Phelan Avenue. The design places the 
sculpture at the foot of a grand staircase leading to the Science Hall, and is part of a 
larger plan to build a Performing Arts Complex directly across the street. 

The plan calls for the relocation of Beniamo Bufano's St. Francis of the Guns to another 
location on campus which has yet to be found and approved. 

CCSF staff has taken a lead roll in fundraising efforts, developing web pages and a press 
release. There is support in concept from the CCSF Board of Directors, as well as some 
funds for the project. However the Arts Commission has no funds to contribute at this 
time, and is investigating possible sources. 

Staff Recommendation : Staff recommends approval of the installation design in concept. 




CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Robert Howard Whale Fountain Relocation 

May 2008 



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Date: 6/10/08 

To: Visual Arts Committee 

From: Susan Pontious 

Re: General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 

The plan for the public art program at General Hospital has been further developed based 
on input from the VAC at the June meeting, and further meetings with both the project 
architects and Kathy Jung, the project manager from the hospital. The attached plan 
describes project areas and budgets. While I would expect that there will be further 
refinement of the project descriptions and budgets as the program develops, I am seeking 
general approval of the plan so that we can move forward with advertising the 
opportunities and identifying a qualified artist pool for these projects. 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 

Susan Pontious 6/10/08 

Project Description: 

The project involves building a new building on the west lawn of the existing SFGH campus. 
The new facility will house 284 patient beds, as well as surgical and other acute care functions. 
The building is nine stories, with two basement stories and seven stories above ground. 

The building design by Fong and Chan Architects features a circular formed building that sets on 
a three story rectangular base (two stories are sub-grade). Patient rooms are located around the 
perimeter of floors 2-7, with nursing and other functions located in the interior of the building. 
Due to the dual impact of the constraints of both the site and the budget, the building is tightly 
packed with its programmatic requirements, and provides limited opportunities in the form of un- 
programmed space. 

Project Budget: 

According to Ron Alameida, project manager, the construction cost of the building is estimated to 
be @353,000,000 in 2007 dollars. He has estimated art enrichment based on 2% to be 
$7,060,000. Using this figure, we would apply our budget percentages as follows 

Design, Fabrication and Installation of Artwork: $5,365,600 

Maintenance: $ 282,400 

Administration: $1,412,000 

Total: $7,060,000 

Schedule: 

To meet the State mandate, the building must open by 2013, but the city is trying to negotiate a 
two year extension to that date. The bond measure is scheduled to go to the voters November, 
2008, by which time Design Development of the project is scheduled to be complete. This 
aggressive timeline forces the Arts Commission to make some decisions very quickly regarding 
the art program, particularly where we want artists to have any direct involvement with the design 
process, or where the inclusion of artwork will require structural reinforcement. It should be 
noted that even hanging 2-dimensional art like paintings or prints requires forethought as 
OSHPD, the state regulatory agency, requires structural reinforcement for hanging anything 
heavier than 20 lbs. on the wall. 

According to the current building design schedule, the following dates dictate the schedule that 
our planning and commissioning process must parallel: 

Arts Commission Civic Design Approval, Phase 2 (Design Development): 2/2/09 

Arts Commission Civic Design Approval Phase 3 (Construction Documents) 9/7/09 

Design Development, Interior Finishes Elements: 7/28/08-1/16/09 

Finalize Design Development: 12/19/08 

Structural Package Development: 1/10/08-12/3 1/10 

Building Package Development: 1/19/09-1/8/10 

Construction bid period (Structural Package) 29/7/09-10/2/09 

Construction bid period (Building Package): 2/4/1 1-3/3/1 1 

Construction: 4/6/11-7/9/14 

Building opening: 12/31/14 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 
7/11/2008 



Project Goals: 

1 Develop an art program for the acquisition of new work that serves patients, 
visitors and staff by enhancing the therapeutic environment and results in an art 
collection that meets the highest aesthetic standards. 

2 Become a model by using research, experience, and examples from the field to 
inform innovative and creative responses for developing an art program in a 
hospital setting. 

3 Evaluate condition and appropriateness existing GH collection, and repair, re- 
frame works for reinstallation. Refresh the collection throughout the campus 
with new works as budget allows. 

Approach: 

The experience of an acute care hospital is one that finds both patients and their families at their 
most vulnerable and research indicates that beyond the aesthetic and cultural benefits art usually 
provides, that a carefully thought out art program can be enormously effective in supporting 
patients, families and hospital staff. Informed by experience and research in the field, we will be 
looking for artwork that evokes the beauty and serenity of the natural world through the use of 
materials, form, light and imagery. 

Knowing that art can have such direct impact on the health and well being of the hospital users 
has shaped what I believe is the Commission's mission for the art program at the hospital. I 
would emphasize that there is no formula to be followed here, and the adoption of some very 
literal art prescription would result in a collection that was dead on arrival. Rather we must use 
the research, examples and experience from the field to focus and prioritize efforts, and to inform 
and inspire our choices. 

Summary of Art Opportunities in New Building and Landscape: 

Interior: 

• Main Entry Lobby (single artist or artist team): Artist(s) could create an integrated visual 
whole in the two story lobby area. Sites of special opportunity include the 2 story atrium 
and wall behind the reception desk, terrazzo floor, and a. backlit glass wall. A walkway 
on the 2 nd floor allows an overhead view of the space, and the railing provides another art 
opportunity. 

• Glass or tile mosaic on 35' wall of 2 nd Fl. Elevator lobby: An artwork here provides an 
entry statement to the maternity and pediatric floor. 

• Backlit curved glass wall at exit of elevator lobbies on floors 3-7: and exterior court glass 
walls on floors 3-7: The architectural design provides a number of opportunities for the 
integrated use of art glass, which is unsurpassed as a medium for providing an exquisite 
quality of light and color. Artists can use of both traditional and modern techniques for 
virtually unlimited expression of imagery and/or texture. The potential use of the glass in 
the light wells that penetrate the six patient floors, as well an interior backlit glass wall at 
the entrance of the patient floors provides an opportunity for both a unified visual theme, 
as well as distinctive identity for each floor. The additional opportunities provided by the 
backlit glass wall in the lobby, glass railing and connector bridge, and glass windows in 
the interior stairwells make the use of glass by artists a unifying creative theme for the 
building 

• Flooring design marking each quadrant on floors 2-7: There is little opportunity to 
provide artwork in the patient room areas, but the linoleum flooring provides an 
opportunity to give a visual identity to each nursing quadrant. 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 

7/11/2008 



• Glass Bridge to existing hospital: This major connector provides an opportunity for glass 
that could have a visual impact both during the day and at night. 

• Purchased artwork for admitting areas, waiting areas, consultation rooms, and other 
locations: 

Exterior: 

• Sculpture for center of vehicular turn around at main entry: This is an opportunity to 
create a signature piece marking the entry of the hospital. 

• 7 th floor Roof garden sculptures: one or two sculptures would provide focal points to this 
area. 

• Plaza between new and existing building (possibly stairwell windows, sculpture, paving, 
seating): There are a number of opportunities here, including visually connecting with 
the entry lobby. 

• Potrero St. entry , walkway on south side of building; (entry sculpture, retaining wall 
outside of surgery waiting room) 

• Pocket garden (s) not budgeted at this time. 
Existing Collection and Other Campus Buildings: 
Repair, reframe, re-fresh existing collection: 



Estimated Budget for Each Proiect Area: 


Entry Lobby; floor, 
2-story wall, glass 
wall 


$360,700 




2nd floor elevator 
lobby wall mosaic 


$138,800 




Curved glass; fl. 3-7 


$125,000 




Exterior courtyard 
glass (14 walls) 


$729,000 




Floor design; Floors 
2, 4-7 


$165,000 




Glass bridge to old 
building 


$200,000 




purchased 2-D for 
waiting rooms, etc.; 
est. 123 artworks, 
framed, installed @ 
$5K ea. 


$615,000 










Entry sculpture 


$1,000,000 




Roof garden 
sculpture 


$200,000 




Plaza 


$500,000 




Potrero St. entry, 
side walkway 


$325,000 




Repair, refresh 
existing collection 


$470,540 




Total Budgeted: 


$4,829,040 




Contingency 


$536,560 




Project total: 


$5,365,600 




Total AE 


$5,365,600 




Balance: 


$0 





General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 
7/11/2008 



Summary of Research from the Field: 

Evidence Based Criteria: 

The current practice in commissioning and purchasing art for hospitals is strongly influenced by 
what is referred to in the hospital field as evidence-based design, which is defined as the 
purposeful and methodical attempt to make decisions using the best available research. 

There have been several studies using evidence-based design to measure the impact of art on the 
clinical and behavioral outcomes of patients in hospital settings. The most significant of these 
studies was conducted in Sweden by Roger Ulrich, who is currently a fellow at the Center for 
Health Systems and Design at Texas A&M University. In this study, he found that heart surgery 
patients in an ICU who were shown scenes of nature with water, trees, and high depth of field 
showed less anxiety, suffered less intense pain, and required lower strength medication than those 
who were shown abstract scenes or no image at all. The findings and subsequent 
recommendations Roger Ulrich constitute the basis of what is called "evidence based artwork," a 
concept that has been largely adopted throughout the healthcare industry. 

The consulting firm American Art Resources implemented an evidence-based art program in 
2002 at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and conducted an evaluation of the 
program in 2007. The evaluation found that the artwork not only created a less stressful 
environment for the patients and staff but also helped create a more favorable and nurturing 
image of the hospital for visitors. Evidence-based design factors in the happiness and well-being 
of the staff and visitors as well as the patients. There have been other subsequent surveys done of 
patient and visitor preferences and experience of hospital art conducted by AAR and the firm's 
practice, along wit the writings and national speaking engagements of its principals seem to have 
largely defined the practice of evidence based art. 

While empirical studies are limited (and I have been unable to find any peer evaluation of the 
validity of their methodology), they are nonetheless convincing enough to be seen as an indicator 
of best practice in the field. In the June/ July 2006 issue of Healthcare Building Ideas, a trade 
journal that serves the design, construction and maintenance professionals, Jack Reichenthal, 
President of Hospital CEO Forum, writes: ". . .research reveals that the investment made in art to 
create a therapeutic environment yields substantial benefits. The research definitively proves 
that patients in recovery from surgery, viewing specific kinds of images, experience reduced 
stress, lower blood pressure, less discomfort, fewer complications, required less pain medication 
and experience speedier recoveries ...Research reveals that art doesn 'tjust hang on the walls. 
But who would have thought that it could have such an impact?" 

What is Evidence Based Art? 

Based on the results of their research, Ulrich and Gilpin summarize their recommendations in 

their book, Putting Patients First. Their top suggestions include the following: 

• Representational landscapes depicted in warmer seasons, with visual depth and open 
foreground. Views with low hills and distant mountains are also recommended. 

• Waterscapes (calm, non-turbulent) 

• Calm weather 

• Flowers (familiar, healthy, fresh and in natural settings with open foreground) 

• Visual Depth with openness in the immediate foreground 

• Figurative art (depicting emotionally positive faces, diverse and leisurely in nature.) 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 

7/1 1/2008 



Research cited in the book, Healing Gardens (Barnes/Marcus), makes the argument for the 
positive therapeutic effect of viewing nature. According to this research, artworks that refer to 
the natural world can be as effective as real landscape in helping hospitalized patients. 

It is noted that there is little known (by way of empirical research) on art for special populations, 
or different ethnicities.) 

Other ideas: 



In a white paper produced for Harborview Medical Center by the King County Public Art 
Program, additional ideas were recommended for consideration in designing a hospital 
environment. These included: 

• Use of light as inspiration 

• Way-finding, both as landmark and creation of more intimate and private experiences. 

• Use of "life stories;" noting that the construction of narratives is what allows us to find 
our way through life and to give its most difficult moments a sense of meaning. In this 
category the King County Public Art Program also sites Harborview' s collection of art 
that focuses on ethnic heritage, acknowledging that in times of trouble a sense of one's 
culture is often an anchor that provides a powerful spiritual balm. 

• The beauty of Science; these are artworks that celebrate the scientific passion for 
humanitarian discovery. An example is Cliff Garten's light fixtures that use the beauty of 
molecular biology as a source of imagery. 

General Hospital Staff Recommendations : 

According to the hospital's project manager, Kathy Jung, the hospital staff sees the art program 
developed for the hospital's Mental Health Rehabilitation Facility (MHRF) as a possible model 
for the new program for GH. This program, developed by SFAC in 1990, features the following: 

• Collection of two-dimensional artwork depicting reality based images of landscapes, still 
lifes, and positive images of different ethnic groups, interpersonal interaction, and 
positive activities. This collection, in both the artists and images selected directly reflects 
the population of the MHRF clients. 

• Landscape and waterscape murals on the support columns of the dayrooms that bring 
nature indoors and de-materialize the heavy columns (David Gordon and Hilda Shum) 

• An artist-designed gazebo with seating in the horticulture therapy area (George Gonzales. 

• Large lobby mural depicting games of the world (Hilda Shum). 

• Outdoor sculpture depicting a diving fish by Hilda Shum; (this artwork is somewhat 
controversial because some Asian patients find the imagery as one of bad luck) 

• Tile mural designed an executed by Johanna Poethig in conjunction with MHRF patients. 

Hospital staff also expressed a desire for more architecturally integrated artworks. 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 
7/11/2008 



General Hospital Catalogue of Art Opportunities: 

INTERIOR 

Basement 2 (Radiology; Morgue) 

Waiting Rm. (1) 

Staff Lounge/conference rooms (3). 

Radiology, i.e. X-ray, CT -Scan, Ultrasound, x-ray (9) 

Basement 1 (Surgery) 

Surgery Waiting/Reception (1) 
Consultation Rooms (2)* 
Staff lounge (1) 

First Floor (Emergency) 

Admitting and Registration areas (2) 
Pediatric waiting (1) 
Main Lobby (atrium/vertical wall) 
Staff Lounge (2) 

Conference/Consultation Rooms (2) 
Consult./quiet Rm. (1)* 

2 nd Floor (Women's & Children) 

Nurse's stations (4) 

Floor 

Patient rooms (35; 8 pediatric) 

Bridge to existing Hospital 

Waiting Room (1) 

Family Room(l) 

Parent's lounge (1) 

Conference Rooms (2) 

Social Worker (1) 

PlayRm. (1) 

3 rd Floor (ICU) 

Nurse's stations (8) 

Floor 

Patient rooms (38) 

Exterior Courts (2) 

Waiting Rooms (2) 

Consultation Rooms (2) 

Staff Lounge (1) 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 

7/11/2008 



4 th Floor (Step-down) 

Nurse's Stations (6) 

Floor 

Patient Rooms(45) 

Exterior Light Court (2) 

Waiting/multi-purpose Rms. (3) 

Consultation Rooms/Social Worker (3) 

Staff lounge/conference (2) 

5 th Floor (Medical/Surgery/jail unit) 

Nurse's Stations (4) 

Floor 

Patient Rooms (45 

Exterior Light Courts (4) 

Waiting/multi-purpose Rm (2) 

Consultation rooms/Social Worker (5) 

Visiting/Interview Rooms (4) 

Staff lounge/conference (3) 

Glass bridge 

6 th Floor (Medical/Surgery) 

Nurse's stations (4) 

Floor 

Patient Rooms (45) 

Exterior Light Courts 

Waiting/multipurpose Rms. (2) * 

Consultation/social worker (3) 

Staff lounge/conference room (3) 

7 th Floor (Acute Care for Elderly/ Roof Garden/ Conference Center 

Nurse's stations (3) 

Floor 

Patient Rooms (22) 

Waiting/multi-purpose rms. (2) 

Consultation/Social Worker (2) 

Staff Lounges/conference rooms (2) 

Conference center * 

Roof Garden * 

EXTERIOR 

Plaza between old and new buildings 

Center of turn around at entrance 

Walkway up south side of building; retaining wall outside of surgery waiting room 

Stair light well (visible from Potrero) 

Pocket park 



General Hospital Public Art Program Outline 
7/1 1/2008 



General Hospital 


Program 
Budget 


6/10/2008 








Received 


Accounts 
Receivable: 


Total AE Allocation: 


$7,060,000 


$100,000 


$6,960,000 


Admin: 


$1,412,000 






Maintenance: 


$282,400 






Art 


$5,365,600 







Basement 1 : Surgery 


Unit= 
number or 
sq. ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Waiting; Reception, 
lobby 


10 


$5,000 


$50,000 


included 


included 


$50,000 




Total Basement 1 














$50,000 



Basement 2: 
Radiology; Morgue 


Unit= 

number or 
sq.ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Waiting; entry 


10 


$5,000 


$50,000 


included 


included 


$50,000 




Radiology 
ceilings/walls 


7 


$5,000 


$35,000 


included 


included 


$35,000 




Total Basement 2 














$85,000 



First Floor: 
(Emergency; main 
admitting) 


Unit 

=number or 
sq.ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Main Lobby 
















Terrazzo Floor (sq. 
ft) 


^_ 5000 


$30 


$150,000 


$30,000 


$40,000 


$220,000 




Backlit glass 


207 


$100 


$20,700 


$10,000 


$10,000 


$40,700 




Atrium piece 


1 


$100,000 


$100,000 


included 


included 


$100,000 




2-D artwork; 
admitting, hallway 


6 


$5,000 


$30,000 


included 


included 


$30,000 




Emergency 2-D 
artwork; waiting 


6 


$5,000 


$30,000 


included 


included 


$30,000 




Total 1 st Floor 














$420,700 


















2nd Floor: 
Maternity/pediatrics 


Unit= 
number or 
sq. ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Bridge to existing 
hospital 












$200,000 




Waiting rooms; other 
2-d 


10 


$5,000 


$50,000 


included 


included 


$50,000 




9' x 35' wall in front of 
elevators (8x20) 
mosaic 


160 


$680 


$108,800 


$20,000 


$10,000 


$138,800 




Nurses stations 4x240 
sq.ft. 


! 960 


$25 


$24,000 


$6,000 


3000 


$33,000 




Total 2nd Fl. 














$421,800 



















3rd. Fl.; ICU 


Unit= 

number or 
sq.ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Curved glass wall at 
entry 


90 


$200 


$18,000 


$7,000 


arch credit 


$25,000 




Exterior court 
windows 


2 


$50,000 


$100,000 


$20,000 


$5,000 


$125,000 




2-D art for waiting 
rms. 


14 


$5,000 


$70,000 


include. 


included 


$70,000 




Total 3rd Fl. 














$220,000 




4th Floor: Step down 


Unit= 
number or 
sq.ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Curved glass wall at 
entry 


90 


$200 


$18,000 


$7,000 


arch credit 


$25,000 




Exterior court 
windows 


2 


$50,000 


$100,000 


$20,000 


$5,000 


$125,000 




2-D art for waiting 
rms. 


18 


$5,000 


$90,000 


include. 


included 


$90,000 




Nurses stations 4x240 
sq. ft. 


960 


$25 


$24,000 


$6,000 


3000 


$33,000 




Total 4th Fl. 














$273,000 




5th Floor: 
Medical/Surgery/ Jail 


Unit= 

number or 
sq.ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Curved glass wall at 
entry 


90 


$200 


$18,000 


$7,000 


arch credit 


$25,000 




Exterior court 
windows 


4 


$35,000 


$140,000 


$28,000 


$5,000 


$173,000 




2-D art for waiting 
rms. 


18 


$5,000 


$90,000 


include. 


included 


$90,000 




Nurses stations 4x240 
sq. ft. 


960 


I $25 


$24,000 


$6,000 


3000 


$33,000 




Total 5th Fl. 














$321,000 




6th Fl.: Medical 
Surgery 


Unit= 
number or 
sq. ft. 


cost per 
unit 


Subtotal 


AF 


arch./ 

engineering 

installation 


Total project 


Total Floor 


Curved glass wall at 
entry 


90 


$200 


$18,000 


$7,000 


arch credit 


$25,000 




Exterior court 
windows 


4 


$35,000 


$140,000 


$28,000 


$5,000 


$173,000 




2-D art for waiting 
rms. 


14 


$5,000 


$70,000 


include. 


included 


$70,000 




Nurses stations 4x240 
sq. ft. 


960 


$25 


$24,000 


$6,000 


3000 


$33,000 




Subtotal 6th Flo. 














$301,000 



Date: June 11,2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Judy Moran, Art on Market Street Project Manager 

Re: Art on Market Street 2008/2009 Program 



Three artist proposals for the Kiosk Poster Series will be presented to the Visual Arts 
Committee members, as summarized below. Additional details and images will be 
provided at the meeting. In addition, the artwork of artist America Meredith will be 
presented for consideration for development of a proposal. 

1. Jaime Cortez proposal: Maiden Voyage 

A series of posters depicting the adventures of one of the weeping maidens atop the 
ornate columns of the Palace of Fine Arts who has come to life. 

Poster #1 : (sample provided at meeting) Maiden wakes up, jumps down and begins her 

journey into the 21 st century. 
Poster #2: Maiden walks to the Marina Green, stares in fascination at the people and 

activities around her. She is noticed but not remarked upon. 
Poster #3: Maiden explores the Mission District, serenaded by a trio of Norteno 

musicians. 
Poster #4: In the Castro District, she meets bearded and glitzy nuns, the Sisters of 

Perpetual Indulgence. 
Poster #5: Riding a Muni bus, she is fascinated by all the electronic devices that 

passengers are using. 
Poster #6: The maiden returns to her post at the Palace of Fine Arts. 

Auxiliary Programming: A poetry reading outdoors at the Palace of Fine Arts or an 
accordion fold book with drawings, photos of the maidens, historical information and 
poetic interpretations of the sculptures by poets and prose writers. 



2. Briana Miller and Thien Pham proposal: The Mighty Defender and the Unsung Hero 

The artists created a poster series styled as a comic that can be read in both directions, 
each direction telling a different story, based on San Francisco and using the bus lines. 
Text is only included in the first and sixth posters to allow for greater accessibility to 
pedestrians who don't speak or read English. (Samples of Posters #2 and #6 provided at 
the meeting, with sketches of all six posters.) 

Poster #1 : Love's Unsung Hero, begins with a couple sitting at a window, with a Mighty 
Defender costume on the wall. 



Poster #2 shows the couple at a bus stop, with the woman pulling away from the man. 

Poster #3 shows the woman on the bus pulling away from the man. 

Poster #4 shows the man in his Mighty Defender costume. 

Poster #5 shows the Mighty Defender interrupting a robbery at the Mint and tying the 

two villains to a telephone pole. 
Poster #6 is a traditional comic cover with the Mighty Defender, the woman, and the two 

villains. 

Viewing the series in reverse, from Poster #6 to Poster #1, the story can be read as 
beginning with the cover, then the robbery, then the Mighty Defender seeming to remove 
his costume, then waving to the woman seeming to arrive on the bus welcomed by the 
man, the couple seeming to pull together on the sidewalk, and finally the couple 
enjoying a meal together in the final poster. 

Auxiliary Programming: A comic book issue of the posters, t-shirts with whole 
illustrations or the logo, or comic book workshops. 

3. Kota Ezawa Proposal: Nothing Ever Happened, Except Here 

Reflecting Market Street as a historic site for political marches, the poster series is based 
on archival photographs with explanatory text documenting a demonstration by a left- 
wing workers' union in 1933 in Mossingen, a small town in southwest Germany where 
the artist grew up. In reaction to the appointment of Adolf Hitler as Chancellor of 
Germany, the leading unionist of the textile companies in Mossingen organized a . 
city wide workers' strike and public demonstration with over 800 workers on the 
following day. This was the only town in Germany that organized a workers' strike 
against Hitler. (One poster image provided at meeting). 

Poster #1: The leaflet published by the workers' union that led to the strike. 

Poster #2: Pausa, a textile factory, whose workers were the first to strike. 

Poster #3 : The high school gym where demonstrators gathered. 

Poster #4: Portrait of Jakob Stotz, a local glazier, who was identified as the leader of the 

strike. 
Poster #5: Procession of demonstrators marching through the village. 
Poster #6: Prison of Rottenburg where the arrested leaders were detained. 

Auxiliary Programming: An exhibition of the documentation of the Market Street kiosks 
with the posters on the street in Mossingen where the protestors marched. 



Date: Friday, July 1 1 , 2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Judy Moran, Project Manager, Public Art 

Re: Branch Library Improvement Program (BLIP) Public Art Program 

Staff is beginning the development of public art projects for four new San Francisco Public 
Library branches — Bayview/Anna E. Waden, Ortega, North Beach and Visitacion Valley — as 
part of the Branch Library Improvement Program. Arts Commission and Library staff are 
recommending that the guidelines developed for the Branch Library Improvement Program Arts 
Master Plan in 2002 for the first six branches be extended to cover the four new branches. The 
Arts Master Plan includes the establishment of an Artist Pool of prospective candidates; the 
pooling and equal division of the artwork budgets among the eligible branches — which has been 
determined to be approximately $75,000 or each of the four new branches — and a community- 
based artist selection process for each branch. 

The Arts Commission is now replacing the BLIP Artist Pool established in 2002 with a new Call 
for Artists for the four new branches. Staff has distributed an RFQ for the new BLIP Artist Pool, 
and is also working to convene an Artist Pool Selection Committee to recommend a pool of 
candidates for the four branches. This Artist Pool Selection Committee will consist of an Arts 
Commissioner, a member of the BLIP staff, arts professionals, and one or more community 
representatives. Then an Artist Selection Panel will be created for each branch, to include three 
community members, the project architect, the branch manager and an Arts Commissioner. The 
Branch Community Artist Selection Panels will each select three finalists from the new BLIP 
Artist Pool to develop proposals for public display and comment prior to the final selection of an 
artist for each branch. 

Immediately following establishment of the new Artist Pool, the artist selection for the Ortega 
and Visitacion Valley branch libraries will begin. As construction of the Ortega and Visitacion 
Valley branches is expected to begin in early 2009, finalists selected for these two branches will 
be asked to provide proposals in September 2008 and be available to work with an accelerated 
schedule to finalize design within several months after selection. Selection for the Bayview/Anna 
E. Waden and North Beach branches will take place in late 2008 or early 2009. 



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San Francisco Arts Commission 

LISTE N 

TEXT ONLY 

PRINT 

A 

A 

A 

July 16, 2008 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, July 16, 2008 
3:00 p.m. 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 D0CUM£NTS DEpT 
Minutes 
Commissioners Present: 

Jeannene Przyblyski, Leonard Hunter, Alex Lloyd Auu L 1 Asuo 

Absent: Dede Wilsey, Pop Zhao SAN FRANCISCO 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 
Staff Present: 

Luis R. Cancel, Mary Chou, Allison Cummings, Marcus Davies, Jill Manton, Judy Moran, 

Susan Pontious 

Note: All votes are unanimous unless recorded otherwise. 

The meeting commenced at 3:00 p.m. 
1. Gallery - 155 Grove Street exhibition 

Gallery Director Meg Shiffler presented an exhibition at Grove Street that will be on 
view from late August to October 28, 2008. Ms. Shiffler explained that while this 
exhibition slot is usually reserved for works by artists awarded the Murphy and 
Cadogan Fellowship, there were no artists this year that were appropriate for creating 
an installation at Grove Street. The upcoming exhibition is a collaborative between the 
SFAC Gallery and New Langton Arts in response to the Slow Food conference (August 
28 to September 1, 2008) located in Civic Center Plaza. New Langton Arts regulars, 
chef Jerome Waag and Chez Panisse host Sam White, will collaborate with artist and 
farm owner Jesse Sch lesinger to create an installation for 155 Grove Street. Mr. Sch 
lesinger will lead the artist team and be the liaison with the Gallery. 

The Gallery will contribute a $1200 honorarium to Mr. Sch lesinger, which includes his 
artist fee and the production and distribution of a postcard about the exhibition. New 
Langton Arts will contribute $300 to $500 to installation costs. Related events will 
include a brown bag lunch discussion with the artists at the Gallery , and a dinner at 
New Langton Arts called "OPEN City," part of their ongoing series called 
OPENrestaurant that explores the urban environment as a site for food production. 

Commissioner Hunter expressed his support for exhibitions that relate to other events 
and festivals occurring at Civic Center. 



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Motion: Motion to approve an artist honorarium to Jess e Sen lesinger in the amount 
of $1200 for his contribution to the installation at Grove Street to be installed on 
August 24, 2008. 
Moved: Hunter/Lloyd 

2. Gallery - SFAC Gallery exhibition at 401 Van Ness 

Ms. Shiffler reported that proposals for the three Gallery exhibition spaces now need to 
be reviewed and approved by the Director of Cultural Affairs before they are brought to 
the Visual Arts Committee for review and discussion. Ms. Shiffler then presented an 
upcoming exhibition at the Gallery, with the working title That's Absurd, organized by 
local artist Michael Zheng and a collective of Chinese artists living both in China and 
within the d iaspora. The exhibition will take place at the Gallery at 401 Van Ness, as 
well as at Mission 17, a no nprofit center for visual culture in the Mission district, from 
February 13 to April 18, 2009. Ms. Shiffler explained that Director of Cultural Affairs 
Luis R. Cancel stated that the proposal could only move forward if the exhibition were 
expanded to include the work of at least one female artist and the title were changed. 
The collective is currently in conversation with internationally renowned artist Patty 
Chang, but her participation is not confirmed. 

There was some discussion among Commissioners and staff about whether the 
exhibition was a survey of contemporary Chinese video and photography related to the 
theme of absurdity or whether the exhibition focused on the work of an artist 
collective. Commissioner Przyblyski stated that she did not take issue with an 
exhibition of works by only male artists if the collective consists of only men. If, 
however, it is an exhibition of a collective, she thought it wa s important for the 
collective to clearly state its vision and mission in the proposal. Mr. Cancel explained 
that he had understood the exhibition to be a survey of contemporary Chinese video 
and photography, in which case an exhibition of only males would not be 
representative of the field. Ms. Shiffler responded that the exhibition is not a survey, 
but that the proposal is from a collective of artists who have formed with the hopes of 
exhibiting their works together. Commissioner Przyblyski stated that a proposal from a 
collective that has formed simply for the sake of one exhibition opportunity would not 
be of strong interest to the Arts Commission, but that a proposal from an artist group 
that is clear about the nature of their collective mission would be of more interest. 
Commissioners Hunter and Lloyd concurred. Ms. Shiffler stated that she would ask Mr. 
Zheng and the collective to contribute more information about the nature of the 
collective including their mission and goals. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that action on the motion will be postponed until a 
decision about the focus of the exhibition has been determined. 

THIS MOTION HAS BEEN POSTPONED. 

Motion: Motion to approve an artist honorarium to Michael Zheng in the amount of 



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$1000 for his organizational contribution to the main gallery exhibition to be installed 
on January 25, 2009. 

3. Installation Design for Whales Sculpture at CCSF 

Collections Manager Allison Cummings reported on the proposed conceptual plan for 
the installation of Robert Howard's Whales sculpture at the Ocean campus of City 
College San Francisco. She explained that the sculpture was originally installed at 
Golden Gate International Exposition on Treasure Island in 1939, then moved to 
Golden Gate Park, before it was placed at the Academy of Sciences. When the 
Academy of Sciences began to build its new facility, the sculpture was moved to City 
College and was damaged in the process of being relocated. Ms. Cummings reported 
that the Arts Commission is currently pursuing restitution with the Academy of 
Sciences, as the Arts Commission does not have the funds repair the sculpture. Ms. 
Cummings presented images of the sculpture proposed for a location at the foot of the 
grand staircase leading to the Science Hall. The plan also calls for the relocation of 
Beniamo Bufano's sculpture St. Francis of the Guns, with one possible location near the 
Child Care Center on the eastern part of campus. 

Commissioner Hunter expressed his approval of the placement of the Whales sculpture, 
which he thought was harmonious in style with the surrounding architecture. 

In response to Mr. Cancel's inquiry about the need for a public meeting regarding the 
relocation of the Whales sculpture, Commissioner Przyblyski and Ms. Cummings 
confirmed that a public hearing regarding the relocation of the sculpture would not be 
necessary as the sculpture will remain on campus. 

Motion: Motion to approve the design in concept by RHAA Landscape Architects for the 
installation of Robert Howard's Whales sculpture at the Ocean Campus of City College 
San Francisco. 
Moved: Lloyd, Hunter 

4. San Francisco International Airport - Clare Rojas 

Public Art Program Deputy Director Susan Pontious presented an image of the revised 
proposal by artist Clare Rojas for boarding area G gate room wall at the San Francisco 
International Airport. Ms. Pontious explained that Ms. Rojas added a faux molding 
along the top of the wall and a picture hanging hook to her design. An image printed 
and painted on board will be suspended from the hook and will tilt slightly forward. 

Commissioners liked the additional details of the molding and the hook. They thought it 
gave the work a comforting feeling and folk art appearance. Ms. Pontious explained 
that this particular work came in under budget at about $68,000, and the remaining 
funds would stay in the Airport's art budget to be used for future projects. 

Motion: Motion to approve the revised proposal by Clare Rojas for boarding area G 



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gate room wall at the San Francisco International Airport, which includes a faux 
molding and picture hanging hook. 
Moved: Hunter, Lloyd 

San Francisco International Airport - Terminal Two 

Ms. Pontious explained that the construction of San Francisco International Airport's 
Terminal Two is a design- build project in which the architect is also the general 
contractor; such projects move at a quicker pace because the construction documents 
do not go out to bid for a general contractor. Ms. Pontious stated that Virgin America is 
the primary client for the remodeled terminal and the airline wants a dynamic 
environment. Several opportunities have been identified, including a custom-made 
fritted glass fagade with finials on the facade of the terminal. Ms. Pontious stated her 
preference for having an artist design the fritted glass fagade, and possibly having 
elements of the work respond to wind or other natural elements. She also explained 
that the Arts Commission would be primarily responsible for design costs, as fabrication 
and installation costs are already included in the building costs. Commissioner 
Przyblyski stated that it would be nice to have a piece on the fagade of the terminal 
that reflects the high quality and value of the Arts Commission's collection in the 
interior of the terminals. 

Ms. Pontious explained that a request for qualifications ("RFQ") was posted with a basic 
description of the opportunities and she is working to gather a pre-qualified pool of 
artists. 

Ms. Pontious explained that as there are almost no walls in the terminal, a work 
suspended from the ceiling would be appropriate as well as visible from a distance. One 
possible location for a hanging piece would be in the recompose area, after security. As 
the focus of the space is open sky, a large hanging piece would be well-suited for the 
site. 

Ms. Pontious also stated that the gateroom areas would be an appropriate site for free- 
standing large sculptures in the Airport's Collection such as Arnaldo Pomodoro's 
Cilindro Costruito and Seiji Kunishima's Stacking Stones. She noted that Rufino 
Tamayo's Conquest of Space sculpture was approved for placement at an outside side 
at the north end of the Departures level drop-off area. Ms. Pontious did note that there 
is a wall in the waiting area that would be perfect for the display of artist Micheline 
Beauchemin's tapestries, which are currently in storage. Re-installation of the paintings 
by Joan Brown and Roy De Forest is also a priority. In response to a question about 
total art budget from Commissioner Lloyd, Ms. Pontious stated that there is about $3.2 
million available for art. She proposed that this funding be used to commission two to 
three large, prominent works as well as smaller free-standing sculptures. 

In response to Commissioner Przyblyski's question about how the Artist Pool Selection 
Panel relates to the Airport Art Steering Committee in terms of selecting artists for the 



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commissions, Ms. Pontious explained that the Airport's representative for the Artist 
Pool Selection Panel is a member of the Airport Art Steering Committee, and Arts 
Commission staff will present the proposals of the selected artists to the Airport Art 
Steering Committee for approval prior to presenting proposals to the Airport 
Commission for approval. Commissioner Hunter confirmed that he will participate on 
the Artist Pool Selection Panel. 

Motion: Motion to approve the public art program plan for Terminal Two of the San 
Francisco International Airport. 
Moved: Lloyd, Hunter 

Motion: Motion to approve the following pool of potential panelists for the San 
Francisco International Airport Terminal Two Artist Pool Selection Panel: Ann Alger, 
Director of Public Art Program for Phoenix Airport; Janet Bishop, Curator, SFMOMA; 
Timothy Burgard, Chief Curator, d e Young Museum; Susan Gray, Artist and Public Art 
Director, L.A. Redevelopment; Ren e de Guzman, Chief Curator, Oakland Museum of 
California; Susan Harrison, Director of Art in Architecture for GSA, Washington, D.C.; 
Kendal Henry, Public Art Administrator, N.Y.; Walter Hood, Landscape Architect and 
Artist; Mildred Howard, Artist; Arlan Huang, Artist; Larry Kirkland, Artist, Washington, 
D.C.; Miwon Kwon, Art Dept. Faculty, UCLA; Lizzetta LeFalle-Collins, Independent 
Curator; Wang Po Shu, Artist; Renny Pritikin, Director of Richard L. Nelson Gallery, 
UCD; Mary Rubin, Public Art Administrator, San Jose; Richard Shaw, Artist; Hilda 
Shum, Artist; Meredith Tromble, Critic; Shelly Willis, Public Art Administrator, 
Sacramento; and Ruri Yampolsky, Seattle Arts Commission. 
Moved: Hunter, Lloyd 

San Francisco International Airport - Secure Connector 

Ms. Pontious presented the selection panel's recommendation of the proposal by artist 
Bob Zoell for the Secure Connector at San Francisco International Airport. Lightly 
frosted glass panels, each 5 x 10 feet, are translucent and have colorful designs 
depicting birds and typography. Sand blasted glass panels along the top and bottom of 
the large panels will have a similar pattern. Ms. Pontious also presented the artist's 
design for the niches, and told Commissioners that she would like to encourage the 
artist to use a technique like mosaic to create some contrast to the glass panels. 
Commissioner Przyblyski agreed with the suggestion and expressed her appreciation 
for the piece and its appropriateness for the site. Commissioner Hunter stated that, of 
the three proposals, Bob Zoell's had the most levity, was the easiest to view, and had a 
modern aesthetic. 

Motion: Motion to approve the selection panel's recommendation of the proposal by 
artist Bob Zoell for the Secure Connector at San Francisco International Airport, and 
authorization for the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into an agreement with Bob 
Zoell for up to $200,000 to design, fabricate and transport their artwork for the Airport, 
pending Airport Commission approval of the design. 



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Moved: Lloyd, Hunter 

San Francisco General Hospital 

Ms. Pontious presented the master plan for San Francisco General Hospital's public art 
program which indicates her recommendations regarding (1) the overall art 
enrichment budget breakdown; (2) locations for artwork and corresponding budget; 
(3) general thematic approach to the selection of artwork; (4) schedule; and (5) 
other considerations. She explained that the commissioned works would be based on 
the theme of the natural world, and incorporate light, texture and color. Ms. Pontious 
stated that the entry lobby would be an ideal place for a prominent work by one artist 
or a team of artists. 

Commissioner Hunter expressed his appreciation for works by artists he saw as a 
panelist for SFO's Secure Connector who incorporate glass and painting in a 
remarkable way. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated the importance of including people on the Artist Pool 
Selection Panel with special expertise about selecting art for hospital settings, such as 
art therapists. She suggested Brenda Hutchinson as one of the panelists. Commissioner 
Przyblyski confirmed with Ms. Pontious that the names of potential panelists could be 
added to the list. Commissioner Hunter noted that General Hospital staff will also 
participate on the Artist Pool Selection Panel. 

Ms. Pontious explained that her next steps will include creating an RFQ to gather a pool 
of qualified artists and identifying opportunities for architecturally integrated works and 
wall spaces for two-dimensional works. 

Motion: Motion to approve the public art program plan for General Hospital. 
Moved: Hunter, Lloyd 

Motion: Motion to approve the following pool of potential panelists for the San 
Francisco General Hospital Artist Pool Selection Panel: Ann Alger, Director of Public Art 
Program for Phoenix Airport; Janet Bishop, Curator SFMOMA; Timothy Burgard, Chief 
Curator, d e Young Museum; Susan Gray, Artist and Public Art Director, L.A. 
Redevelopment; Rene de Guzman, Chief Curator, Oakland Museum of California; Susan 
Harrison, Director of Art in Architecture for GSA, Washington D.C.; Kendal Henry, 
Public Art Administrator, N.Y.; Walter Hood, Landscape Architect and Artist; Mildred 
Howard, Artist; Arlan Huang, Artist; Larry Kirkland, Artist, Washington D.C.; Miwon 
Kwon, Art Dept. Faculty, UCLA; Lizzetta LeFalle-Collins, Independent Curator; Julio 
Morales, Artist and Co-Director of Queen's Nails; Wang Po Shu, Artist; Renny Pritikin, 
Director of Richard L. Nelson Gallery, UCD; Favianna Rodriguez, Artist; Mary Rubin, 
Public Art Administrator, San Jose; Richard Shaw, Artist; Hilda Shum, Artist; Meredith 
Tromble, Critic; Shelly Willis, Public Art Administrator, Sacramento; and Ruri 
Yampolsky, Seattle Arts Commission. 



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Moved: Lloyd, Hunter 

8. Art on Market Street Program 

Project Manager Judy Moran presented artwork proposals for the Art on Market Street 
2008- 2009 Program. Ms. Moran reminded Commissioners that they approved a 
proposal by Jenifer Wofford during the May Visual Arts Committee meeting as the 
second poster project for this year, leaving one additional slot to fill. Ms. Moran then 
presented proposals by two artists and one artist team. Artist Jaime Cortez submitted a 
proposal titled Maiden Voyage that depicts the adventures of one of the weeping 
maidens atop the ornate columns of the Palace of Fine Arts as she comes to life and 
tours San Francisco. Artists Briana Miller and Thien Pham submitted a proposal titled 
The Mighty Defender and the Unsung Hero, a poster series in the style of a comic that 
can be read in both directions and tells two different stories set in San Francisco. Ms. 
Moran then presented Kota Ezawa's proposal, which takes its imagery from a 1933 
demonstration of a left-wing workers' union in Germany in reaction to the appointment 
of Adolf Hitler as Chancellor of Germany. Ms. Moran stated that although she very 
much wants to work with Mr. Ezawa, she was not sure this particular proposal is 
appropriate for this year's narrative theme series or for the Art on Market Street 
Program in general. She explained to Commissioners that she would like to have Mr. 
Ezawa submit another proposal for the Art on Market Street 2009 Program, which she 
proposed take the theme of artworks based on photographic methods. 

Commissioners agreed with Ms. Moran's suggestion regarding Mr. Ezawa's proposal. 
Through further discussion, Commissioners agreed that Briana Miller and Thien Pham's 
proposal was the most appropriate for the final exhibition of the Art on Market Street 
2008 Program narrative Poster Projects. 

Ms. Moran also presented the work of Native American artist America Meredith for a 
future Art on Market Street Program Poster Project. Commissioners expressed their 
interest in requesting a proposal fro m Ms. Meredith. 

THIS MOTION HAS BEEN AM ENDED. 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with 
the artist team of Bria na Miller and Thien Pham for the development and 
implementation of a kiosk poster project with auxiliary programming for the Art on 
Market Street 2008 Program for a contract amount not to exceed $18,000. 
Moved: Hunter, Lloyd 

9. Central Subway 

Ms. Moran provided a brief update on the artist selection and public outreach process 
for the Central Subway Public Art Program. She stated that the Arts Commission 
received over 430 applications, with about 60 from the local Chinese community, a 
percentage greater than usual due to the collaborative outreach efforts of the Chinese 
Culture Center ("CCC") and the Chinese Community Development Center ("CCDC"), 



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press conferences in Chinatown, and one-on-one solicitation with members of the 
Chinese community. Ms. Moran announced that the Arts Commission would be holding 
the first of three meetings of the Central Subway Arts Master Plan Advisory Group on 
Wednesday, July 30, 2008 . The Arts Commission will also hold community meetings in 
Chinatown and SOMA for additional input. Ms. Moran announced that the Arts 
Commission has hired an outreach coordinator, Francis Wong, who has worked 
extensively at the senior management level in the performing arts field in the B ay A 
rea. The Arts Commission has entered into a short-term contract with Mr. Wong to 
assist with the Arts Master Plan process. Ms. Moran stated that a draft Arts Master Plan 
will be developed based on broad community input for review by the Visual Arts 
Committee later this fall. 

Commissioners suggested the following panelists for the Central Subway Artist Pool 
Selection Panel: Larry Rinder, Director of the Berkeley Art Museum; Jeff Kelley, 
Independent Curator; and Hou Hanru, Director of Exhibitions and Public Programs at 
the San Francisco Art Institute. Commissioner Przyblyski suggested that Ms. Moran 
hold a separate meeting with Commissioners to discuss the goals and guidelines for the 
Central Subway Arts Master Plan, as focused attention during the Visual Arts 
Committee would be difficult. In response to Commissioners' questions about the total 
budget, Ms. Manton explained that the Arts Commission is in discussion with the 
Municipal Transportation Agency ("MTA") to determine whether the construction of the 
tunnels and relocation of utilities is eligible for art enrichment. If so, then the budget 
would be about $15 to $20 million; if not, the figure would be closer to $8 to $10 
million. 

THIS MOTION HAS BEEN AM ENDED. 

Motion: Motion to approve the following pool of potential panelists for the Central 
Subway Artist Pool Selection Panel: Jorge Pardo, Director, L.A. Metro Art; Courtney 
Fink, Director, Southern Exposure; Hung Liu, Artist; Jenifer Wofford, Artist; Fred 
Wasserman, Director of Programming, Contemporary Jewish Museum; Janet Bishop, 
Curator, SFMOMA; Elizabeth Thomas, Matrix Curator, Berkeley Art Museum; Lucinda 
Barnes, Chief Curator, Berkeley Art Museum; Suzette Min, Associate Professor, 
University of California, Davis; Jens Hoffman, Phyllis Wattis Curator, California Collee of 
the Arts; Walter Hood, Architect; Rene de Guzman, Chief Curator, Oakland Museum of 
California; Hilda Shum, Artist; Julio Morales, Artist and Co-Director of Queen' s Nails; 
Sandra Percival, Executive Director, New Langton Arts; Jim Melchert, Artist; Marina 
MacDougal, Curator; Lawrence Rinder, Director, Berkeley Art Museum; Jeff Kelley, 
Independent Curator; and Hou Hanru, Director of Exhibitions and Public Programs at 
the San Francisco Art Institute. 
Moved: Lloyd, Hunter 

L0. Branch Library Improvement Project 

Ms. Moran discussed the public art process for the four new branch libraries as part of 
the Branch Library Improvement Project ("BLIP"). The four new branches include 



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Bayview/Anna E. Waden, Ortega, North Beach and Visitacion Valley. Ms. Moran 
explained that art enrichment funds for the four libraries would be pooled and divided 
equally among the four branches for a budget for each branch library of approximately 
$75,000, pending final determination of the North Beach and Bayview budgets. 

Motion: Motion to approve the pooling of funds for the public art projects to be 

planned and developed for the four new branch libraries— Bayview/Anna E. Waden, 

Ortega, North Beach and Visitacion Valley— as part of the Branch Library Improvement 

Program. 

Moved: Hunter, Lloyd 

Motion: Motion to approve the following pool of potential panelists for the BLIP Artist 
Pool Selection Panel: Courtney Fink, Executive Director, Southern Exposure; Mark 
Thompson, Director, San Francisco State University Gallery; Caro lina Ponce d e Leo n, 
Executive Director, Galeria de la Raza; Linda Raynsford, Artist; Reddy Lieb, Artist; 
Joyce Hsu, Artist; Elizabeth Thomas, Matrix Director, Berkeley Art Museum; Katherine 
Aoki, Artist; Leo Bersamina, Artist; Sabina Chen, Executive Director, Chinese Culture 
Center; Kristen Zaremba, Project Manager, Oakland Public Art Program; and Rene de 
Guzman, Chief Curator, Oakland Museum of California. 
Moved: Lloyd, Hunter 

LI. Collections 

This item was postponed to the next Visual Arts Committee meeting. 

L2. New Business 

Commissioner Przyblyski welcomed Commissioner Lloyd to the Visual Arts Committee 
and asked Mr. Cancel if he could work with Mayor's Office to address the need for 
Visual Arts Commissioners who are committed to attending the monthly Visual Arts 
Committee meetings. Mr. Cancel stated that he understood the difficulty of the 
situation and has been in communication with the Mayor's Office regarding this matter. 

Ms. Manton provided an update on the Transbay Terminal and stated that she had met 
with project architects Pelli Clarke Pelli and had seen preliminary designs for the new 
terminal. Ms. Manton reported that the Memorandum of Understanding with the 
Transbay Terminal has been approved and that it will provide the Public Art Program 
with an administrative fee of $925,000 over the next five years to manage their public 
art program. She explained that the Transbay Terminal, headed by the Transbay Joint 
Powers Authority ("TJPA"), is not a C ity agency but a collaboration of Bay Area 
government and transportation agencies that spans ten transit jurisdictions. 
Commissioner Hunter inquired whether the money came with any attachments, and 
Ms. Manton responded that there did not seem to be any particular restrictions at this 
stage of negotiations. Ms. Manton stated she would give a more detailed report about 
the Transbay Terminal in the upcoming Visual Arts Committee meeting. 



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Ms. Manton reported that Patrick Dougherty has submitted a proposal for a temporary 
installation at Civic Center Plaza, which is currently under review by the Recreation and 
Park Department. This temporary project would be funded by the San Francisco Public 
Utilities Commission ("PUC"). Ms. Manton explained the Recreation and Park 
Department's concern that Dougherty's proposed work to be placed on the tops of the 
plaza trees might harm the trees. Commissioner Hunter asked if there was a way for 
Mr. Dougherty to create a self-supporting work that will address their concerns 
regarding the well-being of the trees. Ms. Manton explained that she has forwarded 
comments from the Recreation and Park Department to Mr. Dougherty, who will draft a 
response. The artist has told the Arts Commission that his work has never harmed 
trees. Ms. Manton clarified for Commissioners that her correspondence with the 
Recreation and Park Department includes Dennis Kern, Director of Operations, and 
Steve Cismowski, Neighborhood Services Area Manager in Neighborhood 4. 

Ms. Manton reported on the progress of a proposed change to the Planning Code in 
which the private one- percent- for- art requirement could either be fully or partially 
contributed to a Public Art Trust to be managed by the Arts Commission. Funds in the 
Public Art Trust would be used to commission permanent or temporary works in 
downtown San Francisco, in the C3 District, and if approved, 15 percent of the funds 
would be allocated for repair and conservation of artwork in the C3 District. Ms. Manton 
explained that developers are often unsure about how to fulfill their one percent 
requirement, as building lobbies are not considered public spaces and developers often 
have few options except to place artwork on the facade of the building or the adjacent 
sidewalk. Ms. Manton stated that the city's Planning Department may have some 
resistance to the change because it would make it too easy for private developers to 
transfer their funds to the Public Art Trust instead of providing art at the site of the 
new development. Ms. Manton stated that the text of the draft resolution is almost final 
and should be ready to present to the Board of Supervisors in September, who will 
then refer the resolution to the Planning Commission for a maximum of 90 days before 
it is returned to the Board for action. 

Commissioner Lloyd asked how safe this fund would be, given the current budget crisis. 
Ms. Manton responded that it would be a protected fund established by ordinance, and 
therefore fairly safe, but that it is always possible for another ordinance to be passed tc 
use the funds for a different purpose. 

L3. Old Business 

Ms. Manton reported that she would be meeting with Maya Lin during her visit to San 
Francisco on Thursday, July 17. She stated that the wire landscape sculpture, which is 
a permanent work based on the topology of the Bay Area's ocean floor that will be 
suspended from the columns of the outdoor terrace, will be installed beginning August 
18, 2008 . Ms. Manton stated that she has a full conservation report for the wire 
landscape sculpture. She then reported that the video table sculpture has evolved to be 



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a multi-component installation called the Whispering Benches, which focuses on the 
theme of extinction and endangered or lost species; this is Ms. Lin's first video project. 
Ms. Manton stated that Ms. Lin's studio plans to use LCD technology instead of LED 
technology, which will address many concerns regarding energy consumption and 
power use, infrastructure and cooling requirements, construction costs, and ongoing 
maintenance. She reported that the Academy of Sciences supports this alternate 
technology. The completion date for the video sculpture is targeted for Earth Day in 
April 2009. Ms. Manton stated that Ms. Lin will be working with scientists to develop 
storyboards, and working on the logistics of the wire landscape sculpture, during her 
visit to San Francisco this week. 

Ms. Manton reported on the progress of Diller + Scofidio's Facsimile at Moscone 
Convention Center. She stated that Moscone will provide the $50,000 to retrofit the 
motion system and she is waiting for the transfer of funds to complete the work; she 
explained that she has reserved dates in late September for the work to be completed 
at the Moscone Convention Center. Ms. Manton clarified that the problem with the 
artwork is with the motion system. She stated that she will be meeting with Moscone 
staff to turn on the screen and confirm that the previously working parts of the 
artwork are still functioning. Commissioner Lloyd stated that the technology press 
should be contacted when the artwork begins to work again. 

L4. Adjournment 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:50 p.m. 
MC 7/21/2008 



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Page 1 of 4 



San Francisco Arts Commission 



LISTEN 
TEXT ONLY 
PRINT 
A 

A 
A 



August 20, 2008 



VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, August 20, 2008 

3:00 p.m. 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 

Agenda 



1. Consent Calendar 



08-1 8-08A1 1 : 02 RCVD 

DOCUMENTS DEFT 

AUG 1 8 2008 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



1. Motion to approve the six final poster designs by artist Jenifer Wofford scheduled for 
reproduction and installation in 24 kiosks on Market Street from September 22 to 
December 18, 2008 for the Art on Market Street 2008 Program. 

2. Motion to approve a mural by artist Cory Calandra working in collaboration with 
workshop participants from The Giants Community Fund, San Francisco Recreation and 
Park Department, the Excelsior Playground Program, and San Francisco Giants player 
Omar Vizquel, located at the Excelsior Playground at 579 Madrid Avenue in proximity of 
first base, pending approval from relevant parties to paint over an existing mural in the 
same location. 

2. Gallery 

Meg Shiffler 

Update on the upcoming exhibition at the SFAC Gallery at 401 Van Ness proposed by 

artist Michael Zheng on behalf of a group of Chinese video artists. 

Motion: Motion to approve an artist honorarium to Michael Zheng in the amount of 
$1000 for his organizational contribution to the main gallery exhibition to be installed 
on January 25, 2009. 

3. Gallery 

Joyce Grimm 

Presentation on three artists under consideration for the next North Light Court Banner 

installation in City Hall: Todd Hido, Dave Maisel and Christina Seely. 

Motion: Motion to approve artist honoraria in the amount of $200 each to artists Todd 
Hido, David Maisel and Christina Seely to develop unique proposals for new North Light 
Court art banners in City Hall. 



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4. Temporary Projects in Natural Settings 

Jill Man ton 

Presentation of a proposal for a temporary artwork by artist Patrick Doughterty at Civic 

Center Plaza for a six-month installation commencing in winter 2009. 

Motion: Motion to approve proposal for a temporary artwork submitted by Patrick 
Doughterty for the Civic Center Plaza for a six-month installation commencing in winter 
2009, pending approval from the Recreation and Park Commission. 

5. Transbay Terminal Project 

Jill Manton 

Report on the progress of the Transbay Terminal Project and the possible goals for the 
project. Designation of an Arts Commission representative and an additional 
representative, Walter Hood, to serve on the Steering Committee for the Transbay 
Terminal Project. 

Motion: Motion to approve designation of an Arts Commission representative and 
Walter Hood to serve on the Steering Committee for the Transbay Terminal Project. 

6. Temporary Projects in Natural Settings 

Jill Manton 

Report on current status of the proposal by artist John Melvin for Lake Merced. 

7. McClaren Park 

Jill Manton 

Report on progress of the artwork Philosopher's Walk by artist team Susan 

Schwartzenberg and Peter Richards at McClaren Park. 

8. Moscone Center West 

Jill Manton 

Report on current status of retrofit of the artwork Facsimile by Diller + Scofidio at 

Moscone Center West. 

9. Academy of Sciences 

Jill Manton 

Report on progress of art projects by Maya Lin and discussion of pending contractual 

issues. 

L0. Laguna Honda Hospital 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation of images of artist Beliz Brother's photographic lightboxes on three 

resident floors for Laguna Honda Hospital. 



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Motion: Motion to approve final images of artist Beliz Brother's photographic 
lightboxes on three resident floors for Laguna Honda Hospital. 

LI. 9-1-1 Emergency Communications Center 

Tonia Macneil 

Staff report 

Report on the repair and removal of the artwork Water Table by Clifford Rainey from 

the Emergency Communications Center. 

Motion: Motion to expend up to $15,000 of funds provided by the Emergency 
Management Department for the removal of the artwork Water Table from the 
Emergency Communications Center, for its relocation to an alternate site, and for 
rehabilitation of the artwork to its original condition. 

L2. Upper Noe Valley Recreation Center 

Tonia Macneil 

Report on the final installation of five stainless steel sculptures and one stainless steel 

and glass sculpture by artist Troy Corliss at the Upper Noe Valley Recreation Center. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final installation of five stainless steel sculptures and 
one stainless steel and glass sculpture by Troy Corliss at the Upper Noe Valley 
Recreation Center. 

Motion: Motion to accept five sculptures by artist Troy Corliss at the Upper Noe Valley 
Recreation Center into the Civic Art Collection. 

L3. Central Subway 

Judy Moran 

Update on the Central Subway Public Art Program. 

L4. Collections 

Carol Marie Daniels 

Report on the following three projects at Golden Gate Park: Portals of the Past, Francis 
Scott Key, and Cider Press Bucket. Report on the Crumpler Mural Restoration and the 
Embarcadero Historic Signage. 

L5. Private Percent for Art Legislation 

Jill Man ton 

Report on proposed change to private Percent for Art Legislation and distribution of 

draft Legislation. 

L6. New Business 

L7. Old Business 



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L8. Adjournment 

MC 8/15/2008 
Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts 

Commission office, 25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during 

regular business hours. INFO: Mary Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration 

of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic 

devices are prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the 

removal from the meeting of any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell 

phone, pager, or other similar sound-producing electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or 

administrative action may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San 

Francisco Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to 

register and report lobbying activity. For more information about the Lobbyist 

Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 

Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 

http://www.sfgov.org/ethics . 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the 
public. Commissions, boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist 
to conduct the people's business. This ordinance assures that deliberations are 
conducted before the people and that City operations are open to the people's review. 
For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report a 
violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, 
Sunshine Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San 
Francisco CA 94102-4689; by phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by 
email at sotf@sfgov.org . 



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J 



STAFF REPORT 

DATE: August 15, 2008 

TO: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Tonia Macneil 



Project: 9-1-1 Emergency Communications Center 

Location: 1011 Turk Street 

Budget: Original: $60,000. New: $33,000 

Artist: Clifford Rainey 

Background 

In 1999, the Arts Commission installed Water Table, an artwork by Clifford Rainey in the 
employee lounge at the new Emergency Communications Center. Rainey said about the 
artwork: "I was aware of the stressful environment of an emergency communications center and 
I wanted to create a work of art that would provide an opportunity for relaxation." This was 
consistent with the goals of the client and building designers, who proposed that the artwork 
include water. 

The proposed artwork had been reviewed by an art advisory meeting with a former dispatcher 
and community leaders, however, it was not at all well received by the new building staff, and 
there were several heated complaints. The Public Art and Collections staff were in the process of 
researching possible solutions to the complaints when it was deliberately vandalized in 
November of 2000. 

Vandalism 

The glass sculpture was discovered on the floor of a closet which was accessible only to the 
building manager, the maintenance chief, and the Sheriffs deputies who provided security for 
the building. 

An incident report was written up and the matter referred to the City Attorney who indicated that 
the vandalism was a violation of State and Federal law and could make the City susceptible to a 
large claim by the artist. The artist provided detailed drawings of the damage sustained and an 
estimate of the cost of repair. Some time later, a letter from former Director of Cultural Affairs 
Rich Newirth was sent to the current Director of the Emergency Management Department, who 
agreed verbally to reimburse the Arts Commission for the repair and replacement of the artwork. 

Resolution 

In 2006, Clifford Rainey began repairs to the glass sculpture, which were completed in the late 
Spring of 2007. The matter moved slowly until July, 2008, when staff was able to complete 



negotiations for the repair of the sculpture, removal of the granite base, and relocation to a new 
home, and obtain the transfer of funds. Time was of the essence. The Emergency 
Communications Department requested that the funds be taken from their 2007-2008 budget 
surplus, meaning that the transfer had to be completed by Friday, August 15, which was done. 

The artist has received a payment of $18,000 for repair of the glass sculpture and the 
Commission has received a Work Order of $15,000 to remove the base and support structure and 
to relocate and rehabilitate the sculpture or, if no other site can be found, to deaccession it. 

Requested Action: 

Motion to expend up to $15,000 of funds provided by the Emergency Management Department 
for the removal of the artwork WaterTable from the Emergency Communications Center, for its 
relocation to an alternate site, and for rehabilitation of the artwork to its original condition, but 
without water. 




■ ■ ■ 




■I 


I ' 1 



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Meeting Information 



Archive Cental 

back In ArtNd 



> WsualArts Con 



Visual_ Aft4„Com m ittee 
Year. 2008 u" 



Conrniuwioncn Present: 

.Icannene Przybryalri, Uumard Hunter, Alexander Lloyd, PopZhi 
Absent: DedeWilsey 

Stuff Present; 

l ulsR Canal, MaiyChou, Allison Curamings, Marcus Duties, J 
Note: All voted are unanimous unless recorded otherwise. 



VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 
Wednesday, August 20, anon 

3:00 p.m. 
25 Vaii Ness Avenue. Suite 70 

Minutes 



, JudyMoran, Susan Pondous, Ellen Shershow, Meg Shiftier 



rlir meeting c 



dat3:i2p.r 



I, Conaent Cfrtendar 

Commissioner Przvblyski; 



ifrom the Consent Calcnda 



Motion to approve the ant final poster designs by artist Jenifer Woffordsclieduled for reproduction and installation in 24 kiosks on Market Stroel from Scptcmhc 
December |8, 2008 lor the Art on Marital Street 200H Program. 

Motion: Motion ta adopt Iheconsenl calendar item. 
Moved Lloyd/Zhao 



2. Mural lit Exeeteinr Playground 

Public Art Program Director Jill Manton reported on a proposal in pain I overan existing mural located al Excelsior Playground al 579 Madrid Avenue. She explained 
thai the rourin which the existing mural was painted Li significant because of the California Art Preservation Act (CAPA), which states thai IheCil) does not have the 
right i" repainlorremovc the existing mural unless the City has permission from all Uic artists who painted the mural. Ms. Manton explained thnl the City Charier 
i^uirea Arts Commission approval forbotn the removal of artwork from public property as well as for the design of an) new artwork lobe placed on city property 
Then ai c about twenty artists » ho contribulcd to the existing mural >i Excelsior Playground. Ms. Manton stated that there wfll be .1 motion on the September Full 
1 ■ mum-sin n agenda ta approve the removal of the mural pending further direction horn the City Attorney's office, Ms. Manton explained that the new mural is 
spmuored by the Giants Foundation and painted in pari by San Francisco Giants player OmarVizqucl. Ms. Munlon then introduced Cory Calandra, one of the 
min.jli-.is arid Business Director from Precitn Eyes, and Chris Docltchcr.a representative of the Recreation and Pork Department, toprcscnl the design ol the new 



Ms. < alnndra explained thai the Giants Community Fund, which lunds community projects throughout the Hay Area, is renovating the Excelsior Playground, in part, 
due In Mr. Vjzquol's interesl in the playground and his coidjibution lo the mur.il. The heigh I ol the wall upon which the mural is to Ik- painted slopes from 1 1 inches In 
h feel and 4 indies and the widln is M) feel, Ms. Calandra explained thai the Iroatment of the color of the figures depicted in Ihe audience varj fnun sepia loncd ta full 
color lo represent and honor figures from the past to the present. The imago of the angel is ofMr.Vfe.qucl and reflects not only his athletic prowess bul his desire ta 
help the community. Mr. \ izqucl completed the drawing of the angel while Ms, Calandra completed the rendering of the figure. 



Commissioner Zhao suited thai the expression on Ihe races of the figu 
of the artists and Ms Calandra oonfinncd that it would. Cominissione) 
difforcnl wnys in which tlie figures and lallers arc rendered may invite 
participants from The Giants Community Fund, the San Francisco ftoi 
the idea ami designs that emerged from the workshops. She belie 
in addition, Ms. Calandra staled that because the figures in question a 
probabh get lost. Mr. BocMcherstatcd that the existing mural is in po< 



houklhe happier. Commissioner Pr/vWvski asked if the mural will credit Mr. Viwpiol as one 

erl'r/vhlvsli slated dial she likes the mural picloriallv am) conceptually, hut is conceniedlh.il the 

c graffiti. Ms Colandracxplaincdlhal Ihe design of tlie mural unscomplctixl with workshop 

ecreationand Park Department and the Excelsior Playground Program and she wants lorespeel 

this coTlttboration has created a mum of ownership over the mural, which would deter vandalism 

e located on Ihcshqrterpartol ihe wall, more dimensional rendering of the figures would 

shape so the newdesign is rcalry an enhancement to ihe site and will freshen up ihe park. 



Motion: Motion in approve a muralby artisl Cory Calandra working in collaboration with workshop participants from TheGiants Community Fund, San Francisco 
Recreation and Park Department, the Excelsior Playground Program, and San Francisco Giants player OmarVizqucl, located al ihe Excelsior Playgroundat 579. Madrid 
Avenue in proximity of firs I base, pending approval from relevant parties to paint over an existing mural in ihe same location. 

Moved: Zhao/Lloyd 



3. Gallery 

Gallery Director Meg Shifflcrprovidodan update on Ihe upcoming exhibition proposed by Michael Zheng on behalfofagroupof Chinese artists, She explained thai 

Mi. Zlieng and ihe artists are considering a change of Ihe exhibition title to "IJminal Slagc," with n more descriptive subtitle. The word' liminal" refers to transition and 

change while the woid "stage" reflects the artists' interests in theatricality. The group is talking to female artists such as Patty Chang in order to include 1 ire diverse 

group of artists in the exhibition. Ms. shiftier stated thai the group is not willing to formulate and write a mission statement for their loose collective simply for the 

purpose of this exhibition. She llien showed dips from three video works in Ihe exhibition. Michael Zheng's video "14 Minutes a Revolution" is a recording of the artisl 

singing, and then re-recording the song between two tape-recorders until it becomes incomprehensible. The next clip from the video titled "I will die" by artisl Yang 
Zhcnzhong shows people saj ing 'I will die" in both Chinese and English, first with a smile and chuckle, then in a more serious manner. The final video from artist zhu 
Ja tilled "Never take off* depicts a plane thai never takes off, with a ballad ihai starts and slops throughout the video. The videos will be played on a constant loop and 
ihe exhibition will include photography us well. 

Commissioner I'mt-ly-ki -l.il.d llialllic collective \ision lor this exhibition is thin and il seemed lo relied moiv about new genres pr^lne llian ;iho,il China However. 
as >ll ill* \ idea clips seem lo have a particular point of view, ihe exhibition thesis should stale dial this exhibition represents a particular strand ol work and themalk 
interest, rather than being a survey of contemporary Chinese artists. Commissioner Lloyd agreed dial the exhibition docs not need lo include works by artists widi 
different perspectives il it is labeled ns show focused on a specific Iheme. 

Commissioner Pn^iilyskistaled there needs to be a clear explanation forwhy this exhibition is important lo show in the City's Gallery. Director of Cultural Affairs Luis 
K. Cancel asked il it was a question uboul the value or having this exhibition at Ihe City's Gaiter) .Commissioner Przybryski responded thai there i< value in seeing all 
types of artwork bul the Arts Commission needs to think about why il needs lobe in Ihe City's Gallery. 



issionei /bao staled thai the works do not appear lo him lo reflect changes in China and believes thai as a gn 
Commissioner Prayblyski stated thai while il is important to present work from differcnl perspectives, this i 
Ion is unusual because lypieaHy, a curatorial view scbariy idenufied at tho beginning of the planning stages. 
ion. Ms. Shiffler stated thai the I laltory often hosts exhibition with tight thematic approaches, and that ihe be 

xhibilions of works by Chinese artists in Ihe future. This is not meant lo Ik- a broad sunn. 



er. he be 



vorks included seems to 
tfr. Cancel staled thai this 
here is value to doing this 
s the opportunity to hold 



Million: Motion to approve an 
installed on January 2$, 2009. 
Moved; Lloyd/Zhao 



ulLsllmn- 



rium to Michael /.bent; in the amount of Siooo forhisorganizatioi 



4 Gallery 

Ms. Shiffler distributed a imparl dial presents the work of three artists under consideration lor the ncxl North Light Court banner installation in City I lull: Todd 1 lido, 
Have Muiscl and ChrisiuiaSecly. The gallery will hold a competitive process similar to the process used to select ortisfcii for the Market Strccl posters. The Gallery will 
offer a small amount of $200 lo ihe three artists toerealethc proposals, which will then be presented to the Commissioners. Thcsolection of the artisl willbe based on 
their proposals. The selected artisl will receive $2,500 to create the work, which includes ten banners, one of the ten being an informational banner 



ommissioncr Przyblyski cautioned that a couple of the artists proposed gen 
f the North Light Court Ms. Shiffler explained that the Gallery wfl work cm 



rally workona 
sfullywithwhoi 



ill scale and might hive difficulty creating a work lor the large bonne 
r is chosen to creqlo a successful work. 



Motion: Motion to appro* 
North Light Court art bann 
Moved: Unyd/Zhoo 



thonorari 
City Hull. 



nt olSiilKi each toaitislsToddllido. Hav id Maisct and Christina Scclv lo develop Unique proposals for 



5, Temporary Projects in Natural Setting 

Ms. Man ton provided an update on artisl Patrick Dougherty's proposal for a temporary exhibition al Civic Center Plaza forasix-montfa installalion commencing in Uic 
winter of 2009. The swirling sculpture will span 125 feel and rise H feel above the tree lops, she exphined tltal the Recreation and Park Depart men I is concerned ahoul 
Ihe harm Ihe sculpture ma>cmisclo the lives and about the stability of ihe sculpture given Ihe strong winds at Civic Center Plaza. She Stated thai Mi. Doughcrly has a 
lot ol experience working with trees and contends that bis sculpture wiD not damage the trees. Mr. Doughcrrywilworkwithacrcwofstudcnt\-olunlccisandalocal 

artist lo head the crew . Ms Manton staled thai Hie budget is nol yel I1n.il. bul is estimated to he flboul S55.Ono.TllC installation, which will be on v iew fbraboul one 

year, will lake place in the winter when the trees arc pruned and in adormantstage. 



Commissioner Przyblyski asked to sec an unageofthe installed artwork on lop of ihe pruned trees. She slated thai ihe sculpture could bo quite dynamic if il is i 
for aver one year as the trees growandshod their leaves. Ms. Manton staled that she will obtain a photograph of the sycamores from Ihe Recreation ami park 



•d 



GOVERNMENT 
DOCUMENTS DEPT 

JUL -7 2010 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



7/7,2010 8:35 AM 



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Department when the tivusui'ubuiv.CuiiiinuHiuuui'l'rQ'blyski postponed the itiotion pending review of a drawing of the proposed sculpture by Uie artist when the 

trees arc bare 

THIS MOTION I IAS BEEN POSTPONED. 

Motion: MdliuuliiuppKnuproposuiroruluiiipotiiryuilAvurkAubmitLudbyPaUick l>>ugliei1y for Ihc Civic Center Pbza foiasi>-nioiilli inslalblioti commencing in 

Hiiiui.'uiii) pending approval from the Recreation and Park Commission, 

fi Tnu»sbuyTennlii«IPM>jcet 

Ms Man ton reported on llic progress ol llic new Transhay Terminal, dcsigucd by Cesar PeUiaiid estimated to be complete in 2014. The lotal art budget is $4.75 
millkin, with approximately $;j,a million for llic artwork. Ms. Manton staled thai she met willi the architects and discussed options for the placement of the artwork, 
including the cnlrunccul Mission Street and the rooftop park with its pools and fountains. She slated that she would like to designate both an Arts Commissioner and 
»n additional representative, Walter I loud, u renowned lundseapc aichitecl, lo serve on the Steering Committee fur IheTransbayTenninal project. The Steering 
Committee wilt also include threeotiicr participants appointed by IheTrainjbay .loinl Powers Authority (TJPA). 

Mr. Cancel questioned why the Arts Commission would invite representatives who aiv not Arts Commissioners to participate on the panel. Ms. Man ton explained that 
the inclusion of u participant who is not an Arts Commissioner Ls a way to bmaden the artistic and curatorial perspective of the Steering Committee. She explained that 
Ihere is no guaranlec that TJPA will selecl arts professionals to participate on the Committee and this Ls the opportunity to ensure their input, Mr. Cancel slated thai 
this seemed like an important relationship dial needs to be well thought-out and suggested staff to consider otherArts Commissioners to fill the two openings on the 
Steering Coinniiltee. Ms. Man Ion responded that she believes Visual Ails Commissioners would be the most appmpriale loseneon die Committee. She staled that 
Commissioner approval mid review is not mandated but value-added. Commissioner Pr/yblyski stated that she believes one Visual Arts Commissioner would be 
appmpriale for llie Transbav Terminal Steering Committee. Mr. Cancel staled that he would like a better understandtag about what the representation of these 
individuals would consist of. 

Commissioner I'mlifyski. staled thai Mr. Hood is a great choice for participation on the Steering Committee and il Ls important not only to have arts professionals 
involved in ibis process, but also to have a representative thai the Arts Commission is confident will act in thai role. She stated lliat $;}.2f, million is not a lot of money 
given the size ol the construction and questioned the need For an Arts Master Plan given dial there will probably only several larger works commissioned for the site. 
Ms. Manlou responded Hint the Arts Master Plan is requited as part of the contract and that she had discussed with the architects and project staff Hie possibility of 
smaller works and as well as larger ones. Commissioner Pr/yblyski stated thai projects with a small budget, like $50,000 will not register in the passenger waiting area. 

In response to questions from Commissioners and staff about the meeting dates of the Steering Committee, Ms. Man ton slated the meetings will begin in the fall, 
2008. She explained thai the schematic design will be complete by this fall so there is some urgency to proceed with the artist selection process. Given the timeframe, 
Ms. Manton recommended an invitational competition forthispliuseoftheartislselectiou process. The Steering Committee will meet at key points of the planning 
process throughout Hie several years ol implementing Ibearl program. In response lo a question aboul why the selection process does not have to go through an open 
call, Ms. Munlou slated that the artists will cuter into contract with the Transbay Terminal and the Federal Transportation Authority (ITA) does not require an open 
competition! but il does have cerium stipulations about the jurying process. 

Commissioner Prayblyskisuggesled thai the Aits Master Plan include a list of potential sites and potential artists. Commissioner Lloyd inquired about the definition of 

Mil Arts Master Plan. Ms. Manton explained thai an Arts Master 1'Ian usually identifies llic location, approach and general scale of the artworks for a particular project, 
butdoesn'l necessarily need to follow that Conn. 

Commissioner Pr/yblyski slated Ural she wanted to lake llils opportunity to thank Commissioner Hunter for his service al the Arts Commission. Despite his absence 
from this meeting, she expressed her appreciation lor Ids dedication lo his role as a Visual Arts Commissioner. She stated that Commissioner Hunter served on the 
Aitpori Arts Steering Committee and then asked Commissioner Lloyd if he would be interested in serving on the Airport Arts Steering Committee. She also stated that 
funner Arts Commissioners could be a valuable resource in terms of serving on panels and committees. Commissioner Pr/yblyski suspended the motion pending 

THIS MOTION HAS BEEN POSTPONED. 

Motion: Motion lo approve designation of an Arts Commission representative and Walter Hood lo serve on the Steering Committee for the Transbav Terminal 

Project, 

7. Temporary Projects in Natural Settings 

Ms. Manton reported on the current status of (he proposal by artist John Metvin for Lake Me teed, which was originally scheduled for installation this past week. Mr. 
Melvin worked wilh students from San Prancisco State's Engineering Department bul they could not produce signed and stamped engineering drawings. The project is 
on hold while the artist identifies anolherenghieerand finds a solution that is environmentally acceptable. Ms. Man ion explained thai lire problem lies witli anchoring 
the balloons and suggested thai Mr. Melvin consider using existing structures al Lake Merced, such as a concrete pedestrian bridge, lo anchor the balloons or lo 
suspend the balloon malrix with cranes placed in lour locations around the lake. Ms. Manton stated that the original budget of $;jo.oou would likely increase given 
these challenges, She reported that the Aits Commission Ls considering an honorarium for the San Prancisco State students who worked on the project and Mr. Melvin 
will he paid an additional honorarium for his additional lime and research. To dale, the Alls Commission has spent only Sl.ooo for the project. Commissioner 
Pr/yblyski staled (hal temporary projects should not take several years of planning, and suggested that if Mr. Melvin is unable to find a viable solution relatively soon. 
then the Ails Commission should hegin to work with oilier artists on this series of temporary projects in natural settings. 

H. MeChueii Park 

Ms. Manton staled that she met with Mohammed Nuru, Deputy Direclor for Operations for Uie Department of PubUc Works and ammged lor granite curb siones. 
currently in storage, to be donated to the artist team Susan Schwarl/euberg and Peter Richards for llieir artwork Philosopher's Walk- al McClareu Park, Commissioner 
Pr/yblyski slated that with Ihe large size of McClaren Park and Ihe small size of the artwork budget, she Ls delighted to hear of such a win-win opportunity where curb 
siones am recycled and artists arc provided with granite for their artwork, 

i). Moseoue Center West 

Ms. Manton reported on the status ot retrofil of the artwork Facsimile by Diller + Seofidio al the Moscone Center West. She staled that the $50,000 from the 

('on veu tion facilities Ls no longer available due lo the City's budget crisis. She stated that Kick Seofidio wiQ correspond with a San Prancisco developer in an effort la 

obtain funding to repair the work, bul currently, llic Arts Commission does not have Ihe funds to complete the repairs. 

Mr. Lloyd asked if il Was possible to ask for funding from high-tech companies. Ms. Manton stated that it would be possible hut Ihe Issue of how lo credit llieir 
contribution maybe a problem because no advertising or commercial pur|»sc may appear on the sign. She explained thai she has not yet tried loseek private funds 
because she bus been focused on working within City government to identify a souiee for the funds. Commissioner Przyblyski staled that as il has been five years since 
the video was created, she Ls concerned thai the video might look outdated. Mr. Cancel expressed his concern that the video equipment itself would actually work and 
Ms. Muuton stated that she would complete systems checks uitlic near future. 

10. Academy of Sciences 

Ms. Manton reported on her visit to Walla Walla Foundry lo examine the wire landscape sculpture by Maya Lin, which is based on the topology of the Day Ana land 
and ocean floor. She displayed images Liken during this trip and explained lliat the blue tape shown in ihe images of Ihe sculpture are plans Ms. I. in identified as 
needing more dimension. Ms. Manton stated thai it was a fascinating process losee the development of this sculpture, which will arrive at the Academy tomorrow, 
August 11, and will be installed this coining weekend. She stated that KQED started interviewing Ms. I in two years ago and ihey will interview both Ms, Lin at the 
Academy of Sciences, as well us Commissioner Pr/yblyski aboul the installation. 

11. Laguna Honda Hospital 

Public AH Deputy Program Director Susan Poulious presented images of artist Beliz Brother's photographic lighlboxes, which depict images of flowers, on the south 
resident floors of Laguna Honda Hospital. Ms. Pontious presented alayoul of the firsl floor of the hospital and explained thai the darkened areas are the niches where 

the artwork will be installed. The smaller works are vertical in orientation and will be fiat mounted; Ihe larger works arc all 4 x (> feet and horizontal in orientation. The 
lighlboxes will use tiic same energy-efficient light fixtures as the rest of the building, 

Motion: Motion lo approve final images of artist Delhi Brother's photographic lighlboxes for south resident floors tor Laguna Honda Hospital, 
Moved: Zhao. Lloyd 

12. 9-1-1 Emergency Communications Center 

Project MunagerTonia Macueil reported on the repair and removal of the artwork Water 7Vi6/eby Clifford Rainey from llic Emergency Communications Center (KCC). 
The sculpture Ls made up of two main elements, a cast-glass column formed around the hollow figure of 11 man, and a .t-foot by 6-loot granite slab can'cil out lo create a 
shallow pool. She explained thai tin- building staff had reacted negatively to tliesubjeel matter and the condition of the artwork, which originally functioned as ■ 
fountain. Although a rusting chain and algae build-up were removed, and in spile of ongoing efforts lo allay concerns, Ihe work was nevertheless vandalized by ECC 
staff, who had voiced objections to the figure's apparent nudity and their sense lliat the figure was trapped in its glass column. 

( 'on.iuissioucr Pr/yblyski asked why there is public art in a non-public urea. Ms. Macueil explained thai while the building is essentially closed, Die Emergency 
Management Department requested and Ihe Commission approved Ihe artwork for the common area of the building thai would be the centerpiece of Q quid corner. 
Ms. Macueil explained lh.it following the vandalism, the Kinergcncy Management Department has provided the funds to have ihe glass sculpture repaired by ihe artist. 
Ill addition, the department has allocated Stfl.ooo for the removal of the granite slab undre-installulion at an alternate site. The glass has been repaired and will 
shortly be relumed lo the Commission. Ms. Macueil explained thai the artwork was originally designed to function as a wet or dry sculpture, and given the difficulty in 
maintaining clean water, il was finally determined (hat the artwork would function as a dry fountain. 

Commissioner Pr/yblyski inquired aboul the possibility of deacccssioning the work. Ms. Macueil staled thai she had a conversation with Collections Manager Allison 
Cumuiings and came to Ihe understanding that it would be an abrupt and less than ideal solution lo deacccssion the work from the City's Collection without making an 
effort lo locale a new home for the work in another City building, 

Commissioner Pr/yblyski expressed the opinion thai ihe work does not reully function us u public artwork. She stated thai there is no clear reason why this work needs 
to be in the Civic Art Collection and there are no clear alternative locations to install the work. She explained il is also difficult forCily Departments to allocate a space 
ufsix-by-lhreu feet for the woik given the already limited space for staff in most City buildings. Commissioner Lloyd asked if the base has to stay witlitlic artwork and 

Ms. Macueil responded that il is an integral part of ihe artwork. 

Mr. Cancel staled that the Arts Commission staff will engage in further discussion about Uie future of the piece. Ms. Macncilexplamed that the motion prasenlcd to 
Commissioners is to accept Ihe money provided by Ihe Emergency Management Department for the removal of the granite slab and ils supporting structure. 

Motion: Motion 10 expend up to $15,000 of funds provided by the Emergency Management Department for tin- removal of the artwork WattrTablefmm the 
Emergency Communications Center, for its relocation to an alternate site, and for rehabilitation of the artwork la its original condition. 
Moved: Lloyd/Zhao 

i;i Upper- Noe Valley Recreation Center 

Ms. Macueil presented images and reported on the final installation of live stainless sieel sculptures undone stainless steel and glass sculpture by artist Troy Corliss al 



2 of 



http://www.sfgov3.org/archivc.aspx?dept=3 108&sub=3 1 16&year 2. 



i In- UpperNoe VaUej Recreation Center, The sculptures ri.se from Ihe tops of gate posts at the entrance Lo the complex .mil the entrance in tin- children's playground, 
She explained thai the artist had explored aearbj natural areas and researched San Francisco's native plants to identify specific species indigenous t« the City, The 
nix-fool high sculptures are Bnhirgemonlsofplanls and flowers that arc bare.) a few incites in actual sko. Mr. Cancel inquired annul replacement glnNs pieces I * • ■ the 
sculpture and Ms, Macneil stated thai she would k>"k iui" this possibility. Tho dedication oelcbiation for iliis artwork will lake place on Saturday, September fi, 

Motion: Motion to .ippiow the final installation of live stainless slecl sculptuivs and <»ik- sl,iinl,-.vN skvl nudgb^ Nfulpluiv by Tr.»> Torliss .illlu- Upper Noe Valley 

Recreation Center. 
Moved: Uoyd/Zhao 

Motion: Motion to rwxept five sculptures by artistTroyOirlissal the Upper Noe vmh, v Recreation Center into the Civic Alt Collection. 
Moved: Zhao/Lloyd 

1. 1 Central Subway 

Project Manager Judy Moran provided an update on the Central Subway Public Art Program. She stated that there have been two meetings of the Central Subway Arts 
Master Plan Advisor) Group, which consists of 23 participants, facilitated in part by Francis Wong, the Central Subway Outreach Consultant. 1 !»■ Advisor) Group will 
have one more ineetinK.it the end of September, During the second meeting, the Advisory Group discussed their ideas about the Central Subway Public Art Program 
for both permanent and rotating works; IhoircoinmcnutandsuggcstionswQlbe used in the development of the Arts Master Rjan, and an Appendix with a summary of 
their ideas and comments will be attached to Plan. Ms. Moran reminded Commissioners that at Ihelasl visual Arts Committee meeting, there was a suggestion thai 
Commissioners haw a meeting solely dedicated to the Central Subway Arts Master Plan. Ms. Moran stated that she will provide Commissioner with a draft of the Arts 
Master Plan before the meeting for their review, and have the architects present revised designs of the stations as sonic of the largoropen spaces arc now intersected by 
structural beams and supports. 

Commissioner Przybtyskistalcdlhalshc believes it is important to have one hour dedicated to the discussion of the Arts Master Plan. She strongly urged staff In have 
this discussion during I lie Sept ember Visual Ails Committee meeting, and arrange the agenda accordingly, because a separate meeting outside of the monthly Visual 
Arts Committee meetings can be difficult to schedule. Ms. Moran stated thai her schedule is flexible and is willing to do whatever time works bcsl for the 

Commissioners. Ms, Manton slated that she will work with staff lo postpone agenda items planned lor the September meeting lo October in order to accommodate the 

Central Subway discussion. 

15. Collections 

Collections Manager Allison Cu minings reported on three projects at Golden Gate Park. The column of Portals of the Past has been re-fabricated ami will be installed mi 
August *H. Work on the Francis Scott Key Monument has Liken longer than anticipated because of the time involved with cleaning the green stains off of ihc stone, 
but will be completed before Labor Day and the opening of the Academy of Sciences. TlieCUlerPreM Bucket has been reinstalled and repntinnlcd to match the 

monument. M.s.Cuinminnsalso reported that the Dewey Cruniplcr Mural Restoration project at the .losepli P. l-ce Recreation Center in BayviCVt has been completed 
and a wonderful dedication ceremony took place on August 14. In addition, for Ihc Embarcndcm Historic Intcrpiclivc Signage project, Ihc Ray llridgcnnd Herb Caen 

pvlons weiv reinstalled and there is jus) one additional pylon to be reinstalled. 

id. Private Percent for Art Legislation 

Ms. Manion confirmed wii li Commissioners thai the) received through email a draft of the Private Percent for Art Legislation, ■> prh ileged and confidential documcnl. 

She announced that the developmciit ol Hi is legislation is the culmination of several years of work. The legislation pnwides for the aesllieli. ouisi,;|,l <,f llie ArU 
CominLssion relative lothe I ultilhneiiioliliLs 1 ctpiiivment in the C3 downtown tlistrkt and provides private developers with three options for how te apply their one 
pcrconl publican requirement: ft) contribute 100 nercenl of the one percent public art fee loan onsile artwork; (2) contribute 100 perccnl ol the public art fee to a 
Public Art Trust to-be managed by the Arts Commissron; or(3) contribute liOpcrocnt of the public art fee loan nnsite artwork 4fi percent to the Public Art Trust, and 
receive .1 five pereent discount from their one perccnl requirement, Ms. Manion explained that with most of these development projects in downtown San Francisco, 
five nercenl of the one pcrconl raquiremcnl can translate to budgets in the Si million range. The Public Art Trust will be established h) companion legislation, overseen 
by the Arts Commission, and may be used for both permanent and temporary artworks in Ihe Dj district, as well as the repair and conservation of works in ihc Civic Art 
Collection located in the C;i dklricL 

Ms. Manion explained thai the legislation wiD be introduoed to the Board of Supervisors ami ll: 
change in the Planning Code. Citj Planning will have go days lo take action before il fa 
2009. Ms. Manion requested comments and suggestions I mm Commissioners and as 
confidentiality. Commissioner Pr/yblyski congratulated Ms. Manion on the Icgislntioi 
artworks in downtown. 

17. New Business 
Ms. Poniious reported thai the Airport Commission approved BobZoeU's proposal for the Secure Conneclor. They also approved the issuing of an RFQfora 

pre-^ualified pool ol appraisers lorbolli the Airport Museum Collection and the permanent collection ul | lie Airport Having more current apprised values is 

importaiil for making sure thai the artwork is properly iu.surcd. Ms. Poniious stated thai *>iib Commissioner Hunter resigning from the Visual Arts Committee, she 
needs a Commissioner to participate on the Airport Steering Committee and upronjjngu^Uslsclcclion panels - on airport selection panel meeting on September 24, . 
well as a General I lospilal selection panel meeting on October 24. Commissioner Pr/yblyski appointed Commissioner l.loyd to si I on Ihe Airport Steering Committee 
Commissioner IJnydstateil he would be hapmMosen'e on the Committee if his schedule penniLsit. Ms. Poniious explained that Ihc Arts Commissioner who sits on 
the Airport Steering Committee is usually the one who participate* in the artist selection panels for the Airport. 

Commissioner Przyblyski staled that one of the newly appointed Arts Commissioners, Lorraine Gnroa-Nakala, migbl be able to serve on the .Sepicml>cr:;4 panel. 
Commissioner Przyblyski also suggested that former Visual Arts Commissioners such as Maya Drnisan might be interested in participating in die panel selection 
process if the current Vwunl Arts Commissioners are unable to attend. 

18. Old Business 
There was no old business. 

in. Adjournment 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:14 p.m. 
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sfac: September 17, 2008 Page 1 of 4 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

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September 17, 2008 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

? - Wednesday, September 17, 2008 

3:00 p.m. DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

25 Van Ness Avenue. Suite 70 

AUG 1 6 2008 
Agenda 

1. Consent Calendar SAN FRANCISCO 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Motion to approve a mosaic tile mural at the 24th Street mini-park. Lead artist Susan 
Cervantes will work in collaboration with members of the lower 24th Street 
Neighborhood Association. Painting will commence in October, 2008 and be complete 
by July, 2009. 

Motion to approve two painted rolled-iron metal artworks by artist Isis Rodriguez, each 
completed and installed above exterior entryway gates, one at Rolph Playground and 
the other at Potrero Del Sol Park, and to accept both artworks into the Civic Art 
Collection. 

Motion to approve the addition of Blue Walcer, Director of the CARE (Cancer 
Awareness, Resources and Education) program to the Selection Panel pool for General 
Hospital. 

2. Central Subway 

Judy Moran 

Workbook to be provided by USPS mail 

Discussion of the public art opportunities and priorities for the Central Subway. 

3. General Hospital 

Susan Pontious 

Appointment of Commissioner to sit on Selection Panel for General Hospital. 

4. "Great Streets" Streetscape Improvement Projects - Valencia Street 

Tonia Macneil, Jill Man ton 
Staff report 



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sfac: September 17, 2008 Page 2 of 4 



Presentation of a new public art opportunity for Valencia Street between 15th and 19th 
Streets, and discussion of public art opportunities and artist selection process. 

Motion: Motion to approve the public art program and artist selection process for the 
Valencia Street "Great Streets" Streetscape Improvement Project. 

5. Civic Center Plaza-Temporary Sculpture Proposal 

Jill Man ton 

Presentation of three alternate locations for the installation of a temporary willow 
sapling sculpture by. artist Patrick Dougherty: South Park, Oak Trees on Grove and Polk 
Street side of City Hall, and other location to be identified. 

Motion: Motion to approve three alternate locations for the installation of a temporary 
willow sapling sculpture by artist Patrick Dougherty and authorization to approve 
project implementation budget of $50,000: (1) South Park; (2) Oak Trees on Grove 
and Polk Street side of City Hall; and (3) other location to be identified. 

6. Patricia's Green - Temporary Sculpture Proposal 

Jill Manton 

Report on the temporary exhibition of Tony Labat's peace sign sculpture in Patricia's 

Green. 

Motion: Motion to approve a loan fee not to exceed $30,000 with Tony Labat for the 
installation of a peace sign sculpture at Patricia's Green. 

7. Academy of Sciences 

Jill Manton 

Report on the final installation of Maya Lin's Where the Land Meets the Sea at the 

California Academy of Sciences. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final installation of Where the Land Meets the Sea by 
Maya Lin for the California Academy of Sciences and authorization to accept artwork 
into Civic Art Collection. 

8. "Great Streets" Streetscape Improvement Projects - Leland Avenue 

Tonia Macneil, Jill Manton 

Presentation of Department of Public Works ("DPW") plans, public art program 

opportunities, and selection process for the Leland Avenue/Bayshore transportation 

connection. 

9. SOMA West Ancillary Improvement Projects 

Tonia Macneil, Jill Manton 

Presentation of DPW plans for the creation of a mini-park and community garden at 

McCoppin and Valencia Streets and the outdoor sports facilities along Division under 



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the Central Freeway on-ramp. 

L0. Arts Festival Exhibition at San Francisco International Airport 

Susan Pontious 
Staff report 

Presentation of the October 11, 2008 opening of the exhibition The Art of a City: The 
History of the San Francisco Arts Festival 1946-1986 at the San Francisco 
International Airport. 

LI. New Business 

L2. Old Business 

L3. Adjournment 

MC 9/12/2008 
Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts 
Commission office, 25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during 
regular business hours. INFO: Mary Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration 
of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic 
devices are prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the 
removal from the meeting of any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell 
phone, pager, or other similar sound-producing electronic devices. 
Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or 
administrative action may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San 
Francisco Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to 
register and report lobbying activity. For more information about the Lobbyist 
Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 
Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 
http://www.sfgov.or g/ ethics . 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the 
public. Commissions, boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist 
to conduct the people's business. This ordinance assures that deliberations are 
conducted before the people and that City operations are open to the people's review. 
For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report a 
violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, 
Sunshine Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San 



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sfac: September 17, 2008 Pa 8 e 4 of 4 



Francisco CA 94102-4689; by phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by 
email at sotf(5)sf aov.org . 



, . . , 0A oo^o, 9/12/2008 

http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=88531 



STAFF REPORT 

DATE: September 10, 2008 

TO: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Tonia Macneil 

RE: NEW PROJECTS 

Project: Valencia Street (Liveable Cities Great Streets Project) 

Location: Valencia Street between 15 th Street and 19 th Street 

Budget: Art Enrichment Allocation: $76,000 Artist's Budget: $52,000 

Artist: To Be Determined 

Great Streets Capital Streetscape Improvement Projects 

Valencia Street is the first of several streetscape improvement projects managed by the 
Department of Public Works (DPW) that will come before this Committee in the next few 
months. The Great Streets Program was created in September, 2005 to design and implement 
one-time capital investments on a series of streets across the City, using best practices in street 
design, including landscaping, lighting, and pedestrian safety measure4s to improve life in the 
neighborhoods. These projects are funded through multi-year federal transportation bill called 
"SAFETEA", other federal and state grants, and a variety of local funding sources. Each 
streetscape improvement is tailored to each street and community. 

Valencia Street (15 th to 19 th Streets) Districts 6, 8 and 9 
Community Planning Complete - Summer, 2008 
Design Complete - Winter, 2008 
Construction Begins - Spring, 2009 

Valencia Street 

Valencia Street is one of the City's main bicycle routes, and is a favorite of the bicycle 
community. Over the last 15 to 20 years the blocks near the intersection of Valencia and 16 th 

Streets have become a center of Generation culture, with restaurants of every ethnicity, 

boutiques, antique stores, body work businesses, coffee and liquor bars and the indomitable 
Roxie Cinema. The 16 th Street Bart Station, noted for its Mexican folk-art themed plaza, is a 
short block away. Based on community input, DPW has developed tree grate designs that 
continue the 16 l -Street Bart motif with Dia de los Muertos imagery. Their design and a sample 
of the grating material will be presented at the meeting. 

Pedestrian experience and improvements to the bicycle lanes and bicycle amenities are high on 
the list of goals for the planned street improvements. Sidewalks will be widened, trees added, 



bike lanes improved and traffic slowed as a result of the planned alterations. Details of the street 
renovation are described in the attached DPW fact sheet. 

Public Art Program and Selection Process 

Incorporating artwork into the streetscape of San Francisco is a challenging enterprise. Years of 
experience in this type of environment lead us to conclude that the artwork must be out of harm's 
way. Staff has concluded that art in the sidewalks, art on Muni platforms, art within easy reach 
will not last. Accordingly, staff has identified two possible opportunities on Valencia Street: 

1 . 16 th and Valencia Street intersection . One or two sculptures might be attached to 
existing traffic or lighting poles. This location, while conceptually appealing, is not ideal. In 
addition to the over-head Muni lines crossing in both directions, the busy intersection is a 
visually dense environment which lacks an identifiable focal point. The successful proposal will 
be a strong, simple statement, possibly including lighting. 

For this site, an invitational selection process is most suited, as the successful candidate will 
ideally demonstrate a history of strong sculptural statements and mastery of similarly challenging 
environments. 

2. Artwork on poles . The four-block stretch of Valencia Street is neither architecturally 
or culturally consistent. The addition of trees and widened sidewalks will do much to improve 
the visual landscape. The other consistent motif will be the 64 bike racks that are planned for the 
street, 16 on each block. These DPW-supplied bike racks can be as simple as a vertical, eight- 
foot pole intersected by a circle at the bottom. The tops of the poles would be available for the 
addition of small sculptures. The sculptures can be fabricated in multiples and painted in several 
colors, thus increasing their visual interest. While unassuming, this opportunity offers the 
possibility of exploration and discovery, as the artworks would be scattered all the way along the 
street. 

This approach offers the opportunity to select one or more San Francisco artists who may have 
limited or no experience in public art. An open selection process, perhaps aimed at sculptors, 
would allow new talent to apply. The chosen artists will be paid a design fee for their proposals 
and work with a fabricator during design development. The Arts Commission or DPW will 
manage the fabrication contract, thus assuring consistent results. 

Requested Action: Motion to approve a public art program and selection process for the 
Valencia Street (Great Streets) Project. 



J 



Department of Public Works: Valencia Streetscape Improvements 

Department of Public Works 



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Valencia Streetscape Improvements 

A Renewed Valencia Streetscape between 1 5th and 
19th streets will provide sidewalk improvements on 
both the east and west sides of Valencia Street, 
[improvements include: removal of the striped center 
(median, better spaced and more accommodating 
:urbside loading zones for trucks, improved 
traffic/parking and bicycle lane alignment, sidewalk 
/idening, bulb-outs, pedestrian scale lighting, art 
elements, bike racks, kiosks, and new street trees. The goal is to provide residents and visitors with 
safe and easy access to businesses, schools, shopping and regional transit connections, enhancing 
the sense of place with a unified ribbon of streetscape improvements. 




Coordination 

In 2004, the Municipal Transportation Agency (MTA) secured an Environmental Justice Grant from 
Caltrans to develop a Pedestrian Safety Plan for Valencia Street. The MTA held four meetings in 2004- 
2005 to solicit community input on potential pedestrian improvements and to identify community 
priorities. Through that process, the community expressed a strong desire to widen the sidewalks along 
Valencia Street and improvements to streetscape amenities along the corridor. In 2006, MTA, the 
Planning Department, and the Department of Public Works' Great Streets Program teamed up to 
create a collaborative vision for all users of Valencia Street. 

Community Planning & Stewardship 

A series of workshops, on-site meetings and walkthroughs were held with community members, the 
Mission Merchants Association and the International Brotherhood of Teamsters to evaluate needs for 
the corridor. Incorporating feedback from the previous workshops, the final conceptual design was 
presented in 2006, and received strong support from all groups. The community expressed a 
preference for focusing the first phase of improvements between 15th and 19th streets. 
Conceptual Master Plan Presented at the Final Community Workshop 

Valencia Streetscape Goals - Phase 1 

The three major goals identified for Valencia Street through the planning process are: 
- Providing a more pleasant pedestrian and bicycling experience 



date Printed 9/10/2008 Page 1 of2 



Department of Public Works: Valencia Streetscape Improvements 

Making Valencia Street a safer environment with more usable sidewalk space, improved bike and traffic lanes, 
and sidewalk amenities 
Maintaining neighborhood diversity and balancing the needs of all of the community 

Valencia Streetscape Improvements Factsheet : (pelf ) 

Project Team 

Department of Public Works, Project Manager: Kris Opbroek 

Department of Public Works, Landscape Architecture: Martha Ketterer, John Dennis 

Municipal Transit Agency, Traffic Engineering: Manito Velasco, Dan Provence 



vm. mam "' ,'imKim.m,' .wwtwBaw* 




HXUtTMTM PLAN 



icisw^afs' 



o - 



date Printed 9/10/2008 Page 2 ofi 



Date: September 12, 2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Marcus Davies 

Re: Arts Festival Exhibition at San Francisco International Airport 



Collections staff is pleased to announce the October 1 1 th opening of The Art of a City: 
The History of the San Francisco Arts Festival 1946-1986 at the San Francisco 
International Airport. The result of a partnership between the San Francisco Arts 
Commission and the San Francisco Airport Museums, the exhibit features selections from 
the Civic Art Collection representing four decades of acquisitions from the City's annual 
Arts Festivals. Comprised of a variety of media including paintings, works on paper, 
jewelry and ceramics, the exhibit explores the overlapping history of the festival program 
and the regional artistic identities that it encouraged. 

History of the San Francisco Arts Festivals 

In October 1946 the first municipally sponsored Arts Festival was held in the City's Civic 
Center. The event, a collaborative effort between the San Francisco Arts Commission and 
a group of artists frustrated by the scarcity of local museums and galleries, drew hundreds 
of participants and firmly established the viability of a highly democratized alternative to 
the relative exclusivity of existing exhibition venues. As the festivals grew in popularity 
and attendance over the years they became a significant forum for the exchange of visual 
ideas and material technique. By mid-century this creative current was fully evident in 
the expressive mingling of fine art and craft tradition that shaped the Bay Area studio 
movement and informed the work of artists such as Merry Renk, Peter Macchiarini and 
Anthony Prieto. 

From 1946 until the last years of the Arts Festivals in the mid-1980s, the Arts 
Commission used budgeted monies from the City's general fund to purchase jury- 
selected work by contributing local artists. As a result, the Civic Art Collection contains a 
number of early works by influential artists, including Robert Arneson, Bruce Beasley 
and Viola Frey. In 1978 an exhibit of Arts Festival acquisitions was held at the Arts 
Commission's gallery, followed in 1986 by a second showing in the lobby of the 
TransAmerica Building, after which many of the objects were incorporated into the Arts 
Commission's interdepartmental loan program for display in City offices. For many of 
the artworks included in The Art of a City, this is the first time they have been publicly 
exhibited in over twenty years. 

The Art of a City: The History of the Arts Festival 1946-1986 runs from October 11, 
2008 through April 1 th , 2009 and is located pre-security in the San Francisco 
International Airport's International Terminal Main Hall, Gallery G2. The exhibition is 
on view twenty-four hours a day and is free of charge. 



c: September 1 7, 2008 



http://sfgov.org/site/sfac_page. asp?id=90057 



San Francisco Arts Commission 



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DOCUMENTS DEP" 

OCT " 7 2008 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



September 17, 2008 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, September 17, 2008 

3:00 p.m. 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 

Minutes 

Commissioners Present: 

Jeannene Przyblyski, Lorraine Garcia-Nakata, P.J. Johnston, Alexander Lloyd 
Absent: Dede Wilsey 
Staff Present: 

Luis R. Cancel, Mary Chou, Allison Cummings, Nancy Gonchar, Tonia Macneil, Jill Manton, 
Judy Moran, Susan Pontious, Ellen Shershow 
Note: All votes are unanimous unless recorded otherwise. 



The meeting commenced at 3:11 p.m. 
1. Consent Calendar 

1. Motion to approve a mosaic tile mural at the 24th Street mini-park by lead artist 
Susan Cervantes in collaboration with members of the lower 24th Street Neighborhood 
Association to commence in October, 2008 and be complete by July, 2009. 

2. Motion to approve two painted rolled-iron metal artworks by artist Isis Rodriguez, each 
installed above exterior entryway gates, one at Rolph Playground and the other at 
Potrero Del Sol Park, and to accept both artworks into the Civic Art Collection. 

3. Motion to approve the addition of Blue Walcer, Director of the CARE (Cancer 
Awareness, Resources and Education) program to the Selection Panel pool for General 
Hospital. 



Motion: Motion to adopt the consent calendar items. 
Moved: Garcia-Nakata/Lloyd 

2. Central Subway 

Project Manager Judy Moran introduced Albert Hoe, Central Subway Project Engineer, 
and Mona Tamari, Central Subway Project Architect. She then thanked the 



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Commissioners for allotting one hour of the meeting to discuss a draft of the Central 
Subway Arts Master Plan. Ms. Moran announced two upcoming Central Subway Public Art 
Program community meetings on September 18th at the Museum of the African 
Diaspora, and on September 23rd at the Chinese Historical Society of America. These two 
meetings are intended to provide the public with an opportunity to provide input into the 
public art program for the Central Subway stations. Ms. Moran also announced that the 
third and final Central Subway Arts Master Plan Advisory Group meeting will take place 
on Friday, September 26th. Ms. Moran explained that she will incorporate comments 
from the two public meetings, from the Advisory Group, and from the Commissioners into 
a revised draft of the Arts Master Plan, which she will provide to Commissioners for their 
review during the October Visual Arts Committee meeting. Ms. Moran then introduced 
Ms. Tamari to present images of the architecture and design of the three underground 
Central Subway stations. 

Ms. Tamari showed images of the distinctive cross-sectional designs of the three 
underground stations. She then showed a brief animation of passengers traveling along 
the escalator path of the Chinatown station, pointing out areas where passengers 
naturally pause or slow down as potential spaces for artworks. She explained that the 
design of the stations is based on an intuitive way-finding. Ms. Tamari stated that while 
the volumes of space shown in the images of the station designs are accurate, the 
finishes and colors are not accurately presented. She explained that the architects are 
leaning towards a minimal, restrained palette; the vibrancy and color in the stations will 
come from the people and the artworks. The finishes will consist of glass for the 
elevators, metal for the guardrails and the trains, and exposed concrete, which reveal the 
unique forms of each of the stations. The elevators have glass walls for security reasons 
and enable passengers to see where they are going. For the Chinatown station, the 
entrance will be in the lobby of a multi-story building, the design of which is yet to be 
determined. The concourse level with the ticketing area and a walkway above the 
platform level will be a place of pause for passengers. 

For the Union Square/Market Street Station, there will an entrance at Union Square and 
on the concourse level of the Market Street Powell station, connected by a 
two-block-long concourse. While the basic materials for the station will also be concrete, 
glass, and metal, the station will be distinguished by color. The walls along the concourse 
of the Union Square/Market Street Station will likely have a direct connection to the 
aboveground retail businesses. The platform level of the Union Square/Market Street 
Station is double-height or 40 feet high so it is a tall and dramatic space. 

The Moscone Station entrance is located on the corner of Fourth and Folsom Streets with 
one entrance to be located in the lobby of an as-yet-to-be-determined multi-storied 
building that will replace the existing gas station. There is one escalator that brings 
passengers down to the Ticketing Hall, which is a double-height space, and only one 
entrance into the subway station on the west side of Fourth Street. There are also 
elevated walkways along the platform. 



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Ms. Tamari then presented various types of art opportunities at the different stations. 
Examples of locations include the dramatic double-height concourse space with tall walls 
viewable as passengers descend the escalator; the curved roof of the Chinatown station 
which creates a curved upper walkway with spaces for display cases along the wall; 
opportunities for hanging elements/sculptural pieces in ticketing hall areas; and the long 
uninterrupted length of the ceiling and floor along the two-block long concourse of the 
Union Square/Market Street Station. Other opportunities are the glass walls of the 
elevators, the floors, which could be of polished concrete or terrazzo in the Union 
Square/Market Street station concourse, and the benches on the platforms. 

Ms. Moran reported that among the comments from the Advisory Group, there was a lot 
of consensus but also a range of concerns. She explained that there is an interest in 
having neighborhoods represented in the artwork but not to have works that are 
culturally stereotypical. The Advisory Group thought there should be design consistency 
from one station to another. Some people wanted cutting-edge work while others wanted 
works that would promote a calm and peaceful environment; Ms. Moran explained that 
the challenge will be to find a balance. She also noted a strong interest among Advisory 
Group members for rotating exhibitions. Ms. Moran emphasized that the Arts Commission 
was not expecting a consensus from the Advisory Group, the purpose of the Group being 
to gather a range of ideas. 

Commissioner Przyblyski inquired about the next steps of the Advisory Group. Ms. Moran 
responded that the Advisory Group will review a rough draft of the Arts Master Plan and 
provide final comments during the third and final meeting on September 26th. After the 
two public meetings on September 18th and 23rd, Arts Commission staff will incorporate 
comments from these meetings as well as the Advisory Group meetings into the Arts 
Master Plan. Ms. Moran will then submit a revised version of the Arts Master Plan to the 
Arts Commissioners for the October Visual Arts Committee meeting for final approval 
before distribution. The next step will then be to develop cost estimates and budgets for 
various types of artworks in a range of materials for the Central Subway art 
opportunities. 

Commissioner Garcia-Nakata stated that based on her review of the Arts Master Plan it 
seemed as though there were two conflicting voices: one in support of light boxes for the 
presentation of artworks, and the other that considered such technology prohibitive 
because of maintenance issues. Ms. Moran explained that light boxes are relatively easy 
to maintain. She also stated that the issue of technology is a difficult one as no one 
knows what technology will look like in 2016. Ms. Moran stated that advertising was an 
important issue raised by the Advisory Groups. Commissioner Przyblyski stated that the 
advertising plans for the stations should be determined with the MTA and an agreement 
memorialized n writing, to be included in the Arts Master Plan and Ms. Moran concurred. 
Ms. Moran stated that the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency ("MTA") will 
rely heavily on income from advertising space in the Central Subway stations to maintain 
and repair the stations. She also said that she and Ms. Manton had met with MTA staff to 
begin discussions about the allocation of space for both advertising and art in the 



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stations. 

Commissioner Przyblyski asked if there will there be a budget for funding ongoing 
projects. Ms. Moran stated that the Arts Commission hopes to find a way to create a 
reserve to fund the rotating exhibitions. In response to Commissioner Przyblyski's inquiry 
about the model of funding used for the Art on Market Street Program, Ms. Manton 
explained that this is one model that could be used to fund artworks for the Central 
Subway rotating exhibitions; an agreement between the MTA and the station advertising 
vendor could provide for a portion of advertising space for artwork along with a dedicated 
annual allocation for that purpose from the advertising revenue. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that as the Art on Market Street Program engages the 
themes of transportation and transit, the program is not just an altruistic gift from the 
MTA to the Arts Commission but a way for the MTA to promote public transportation and 
outreach to the neighborhoods. Commissioner Przyblyski explained that one of the 
challenges of having a temporary arts program connected with advertising is to deliver it 
in a way that does not look like advertising. 

Commissioner Johnston suggested the Arts Commission negotiate with Muni to connect 
the advertising displays with an ongoing art program. He stated that the Art on Market 
Street Program is a good example of how to structure the Central Subways Public Art 
Program. He explained that a firm long-lasting agreement with the MTA for such a 
program is important because as Muni continues to grow it will want to increase the 
amount of advertising to generate revenue. Commissioner Johnston explained that the 
Art on Market Street Program was developed in the late 1980s, and it is important to 
create such a relationship at the beginning of the Central Subway Project. Director of 
Cultural Affairs Luis R. Cancel stated that the Arts Commission should focus on using a 
portion of the MTA's advertising display equipment for art programming. Ms. Manton 
reiterated the importance of claiming certain station spaces for the artwork with an 
agreement that they would not be available in the future for advertising; for example, 
some of the prime spaces at the new San Francisco International Airport terminal have 
already been allocated to advertising. 

Commissioner Garcia-Nakata asked how the boundaries between artwork and advertising 
will be articulated in the Arts Master Plan and how it will take into account changes in 
technology. She also explained that endowments have to be fairly significant in amount 
to generate enough funding for maintenance and repairs as interest rates are so low. She 
asked about other approaches for funding that the Arts Commission is planning to use. 

Ms. Moran stated that the funding for the rotating exhibitions is still in the process of 
being developed and as these exhibitions will not begin until 2016, there is still time to 
develop the program. Ms. Moran stated that perhaps a reserve rather than an 
endowment is the more appropriate path. She stated that the focus right now, however, 
is on the permanent works as the Arts Commission needs to move forward with the 
selection of artists to create works that will be integrated into the architectures of the 



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stations. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata stated that the Arts Master Plan should include 
language about the creation of a financial development plan for the rotating exhibitions. 
Ms. Manton added that if the Private Percent for Art Legislation is approved by the Board 
of Supervisors, then that is another potential source for funding a rotating exhibition 
program of the artworks if they are located in the C3 downtown district. 

Commissioner Przyblyski asked about funding for the ongoing temporary projects that 
would occur while the stations are under construction. Ms. Moran stated that the Arts 
Commission will work with existing arts and cultural organizations along the Central 
Subway corridor to develop the temporary programs. These organizations will be selected 
from a competitive process and there will be one or two events or programs a year that 
will take place in one neighborhood one year and then the next neighborhood the 
following year. The event or program could be a one-time event with auxiliary materials 
and a public display. Ms. Moran stated that an example of a program could be an 
evening screening of historic films about the development of transit. Another example is 
a youth arts program in which youth work with artists and organizations along the 
Central Subway corridors in a variety of meaningful ways. 

Commissioner Przyblyski asked how these temporary programs would be articulated in 
the Arts Master Plan. Ms. Moran stated that a description of the temporary art program 
will be included in the Arts Master Plan. Commissioner Przyblyski stated that there is the 
potential to look at temporary art programming as putting money back into impacted 
neighborhoods during the construction period. She emphasized the need to explain the 
purpose of having a temporary art program in the Arts Master Plan. Commissioner 
Garcia-Nakata stated that it is important to set parameters for what the neighborhoods 
can have so their expectations are not over and above what is possible. Mr. Cancel 
concurred that it is important to include the parameters of the temporary programs in 
the Arts Master Plan. Ms. Moran stated that after completion the Arts Master Plan may 
require revisions and additions as the Central Subway Public Art Program progresses over 
the next eight years. 

Ms. Moran stated that the Advisory Group is interested in artworks that are located at 
the station entrances and that serve to enhance the areas around the stations; the 
Advisory Group also wants key identifiable elements at the station entrances as the ones 
for Muni and BART are somewhat nondescript. Ms. Tamari explained that the design of 
the station entrances will be coordinated with the buildings above but will also have its 
own statement. The signage will have to be coordinated with the architecture and design 
of the building itself. Commissioner Przyblyski stated that BART had expressed their wish 
to have artists design canopies to the station entrances as they could not be easily 
identified by passengers. 

Commissioner Johnston explained that there will be an enormous amount of community 
pressure to share the Central Subway public art funding with the community and this will 
be a challenge as the three stations are located in such distinct and self-identified areas. 
He stated that as Muni will need to appease the businesses in Union Square impacted by 



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the construction, the Union Square retailers will have a huge influence on how their 
stores are presented in the stations if access to them is granted along the underground 
concourse. Commissioner Johnston stated that a strong design for the aboveground 
entrances to the stations would be a great asset to the neighborhoods. Commissioner 
Garcia-Nakata stated that such a design would also set a precedent for other 
neighborhoods who may want the same type of design; she cautioned that the design 
should be one that does not become quickly outdated. 

Commissioner Przyblyski explained that a major statement at each of the station 
entrances will consume a large portion of the funding and she wonders how this will 
affect other priorities if the Arts Commission wants to have two or three different types 
of works in each of the stations. She does not think the budget will allow a huge 
sculpture in the interior of the station as well as a prominent work at the entrance. Ms. 
Moran stated that she would like to hear from Visual Arts Commissioners what they 
believe the priorities are for the permanent works in the stations. In response, 
Commissioner Przyblyski stated that she believes the art program will be successful if 
someone in 2016 says "I will meet you at the X (artwork)" so that the artwork becomes a 
defining element of the station, making it a destination or a landmark in the City. 

Commissioner Garcia-Nakata asked if there was a way to clearly define the priorities for 
the art program (i.e. an aboveground artwork, an underground artwork, a landmark, 
etc.) and then identify what is possible once the budget is established and once the 
buildings above the stations are determined. Ms. Tamari explained that the. station 
entrances will be located on the ground floor and then construction of the building above 
will come in a later phase. 

Ms. Moran explained that the aboveground presence is very important to the Chinatown 
community. Commissioner Przyblyski asked if an aboveground presence would consist of 
something similar to the light standards and gates on Grant Street. Ms. Manton 
explained that the community has expressed interest in enhancing the canopies on 
existing storefronts and in having artwork help identify pedestrian routes adjacent to the 
station. Commissioner Johnston stated that as the type of business that will occupy the 
building above the station entrances will have a great impact on the design of the station 
entrance, he would like clarification about the timeframe for determining which business 
will occupy the building. 

Mr. Hoe explained that decisions about the aboveground facility will not be concurrent 
with the beginning of construction for the Central Subway. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata 
stated that it is important to ensure there is cooperation and integration between the 
artwork installed at the entrance and the type of facility that will be constructed over the 
entrance as it may have a very particular aesthetic and brand. She warned against 
commissioning an artwork that doesn't fit with the resulting facility. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that a temporary, low-budget solution for an 
aboveground presence adjacent to a station could consist of a banner program or light 



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standards to be placed along a one block radius. She stated that each of the Central 
Subway stations should have a major signature piece; a temporary rotating exhibit; and 
a broadly dispersed place-making intervention throughout the station, or a conceptual 
through-line. Mr. Cancel stated that with the uncertainty about the multi-level facility 
above the Chinatown and the Moscone station entrances, the budget for artworks 
underground should be determined first. Commissioners stated that a private 
development above the entrance stations, if located in the C-3 district, could generate its 
own percent for art requirement which could then become another opportunity for a 
public artwork at the entrances. 

Ms. Moran thanked Commissioners for the opportunity to allocate one hour of the 
meeting to the Central Subway Arts Master Plan and encouraged Commissioners to 
contact her directly if they had any more comments or suggestions. 

3. General Hospital 

Deputy Director of the Public Art Program Susan Pontious requested the appointment of 
an Arts Commissioner to sit on the Selection Panel for General Hospital on Friday, 
October 24th. Commissioner Przyblyski asked Commissioner Garcia-Nakata if she would 
be interested in serving as the point Commissioner for General Hospital. Commissioner 
Garcia-Nakata stated that she will check her schedule and respond directly to Ms. 
Pontious. Ms. Pontious explained that the art budget for commissioning several artworks 
for General Hospital will be $5.5 million. The first step will be the selection of a 
pre-qualified pool of artists. Then the panel will focus their selection on artists to create 
artworks that will be integrated into the architecture; these will include artworks that are 
part of the lobby design and various glass opportunities. The panel will meet on multiple 
occasions to make additional selections of artists for other opportunities at General 
Hospital. 

Commissioner Garcia-Nakata asked if the Arts Commission has someone like a doctor at 
General Hospital to participate on the panel. Ms. Pontious explained that Kathy Jung, 
Project Manager at General Hospital, will participate on the panel as well as Blue Walcer, 
Director of CARE (Cancer Awareness, Resources and Education) who does programming 
with cancer patients, and artist Hilda Shum. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata recommended 
Sandra Herna ndez, an MD as well as CEO of the San Francisco Foundation for future 
panels. 

4. "Great Streets" Streetscape Improvement Projects - Valencia Street 

Project Manager Tonia Macneil presented a new public art opportunity for Valencia Street 
between 15th and 19th Streets as part of the Municipal Transportation Authority's Great 
Streets Streetscape Improvement Project, which rehabilitates a series of streets with 
state and federal money. Ms. Macneil stated that the project budget at Valencia Street is 
$52,000 for a four-block area and the streetscape design is currently at 90 percent 
design level. The area is a fluctuating urban landscape with limited opportunities for 
making a prominent statement. She stated that the improvements are intended to make 
the streets more livable and will include, among other elements, an expanded sidewalk 



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with new lighting, trees, 64 bicycle racks, and more consistent bicycle lanes. 

Ms. Macneil stated that the corner of 16th and Valencia Streets would be a great location 
for artwork but anything installed at that site would have to be attached to the existing 
traffic light poles or pedestrian light poles. She explained that the site is very close to the 
16th street BART station and the community has expressed their interest in incorporating 
the Mexican folkloric sensibility found in the "papel picado"-style fences along the BART 
station and the illuminated glass house by artist Cork Marcheschi and community tile 
mural on the elevator tower. She stated that the Department of Public Works ("DPW") 
proposed using a "Day of the Dead" theme for horizontal bike racks and tree grates. Ms. 
Macneil suggested vertical bike racks that are eight feet tall with a sculpture or artwork 
installed at the top of the poles although there would be limitations placed on the scale 
and material of the artwork and sculpture. The budget would allow for approximately 30 
or 40 bike racks, as DPW would be paying for the racks themselves. 

Mr. Cancel stated that he hoped the artists could come up with a more visually 
interesting sculpture than those shown in the images. Ms. Macneil asked Commissioners 
what they thought about the "Day of the Dead" theme. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata 
explained that "papel picado" is more universal and colorful and the "Day of the Dead" 
theme is more specific to a particular community and may perhaps be controversial. 

Commissioner Przyblyski expressed her preference for continuing the theme of the 
artworks installed at the nearby BART station. She supported the idea of creating 
artworks with the bike racks and suggested building on the folkloric and historic 
background of the neighborhood. 

Commissioner Garcia-Nakata stated that she liked the idea of vertical bike racks because 
they would complement the new row of trees along the sidewalk. She stated that 
perhaps the artists could do something creative with the poles. She also stated that if 
maintenance was an issue in terms of the scratches, perhaps the racks could remain in 
their raw state instead of coated with a color. 

Motion: Motion to approve the public art program of art on bike racks and selection of 
one to four artists for the Valencia Street from Streetscape Improvement Project. 
Moved: Garcia-Nakata/Lloyd 

5. Civic Center Plaza-Temporary Sculpture Proposal 

Ms. Manton reported that the original plans for an installation of a temporary willow 
sapling sculpture by artist Patrick Dougherty on the sycamore trees at Civic Center Plaza 
were not going to be feasible because the trees would not be able to support the 
sculpture, according to the Recreation and Park Department. Ms. Manton also explained 
that the Recreation and Park Department is proceeding with caution regarding the 
maintenance of the trees because of a recent Division of Occupational Safety and Health 
("Cal/OSHA") fine resulting from an accident related to the pruning of the sycamores. 
Ms. Manton presented two alternative locations for Mr. Dougherty's installation: South 



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Park and the oak trees on the Grove and Polk Street sides of City Hall. Ms. Manton 
presented images of the oak trees at City Hall, which were suggested as a potential site 
by the Recreation and Park Department, but Commissioners did not think this would be 
an appropriate location for the sculpture. Ms. Manton stated that the flag poles on Civic 
Center Plaza would not work because they are located too far apart from one another. 
Ms. Manton explained that Mr. Dougherty suggested South Park as a possible location for 
a free-standing sculpture but she thought the site might be too small and confined for 
his work. Commissioners and Mr. Cancel suggested other potential sites including Golden 
Gate Park, the facade of City Hall, the interior of City Hall, the parking structure on Civic 
Center Plaza, and a pump station. Ms. Manton stated that she will check with the 
Recreation and Park Department about the suggested sites, take pictures of some of the 
potential locations, and encourage Mr. Dougherty to consider a location for his artwork 
that will be more prominently showcased in the City's important civic spaces. 
Commissioner Przyblyski stated that the motion will be postponed. 

THIS MOTION IS POSTPONED 

Motion: Motion to approve three alternate locations for the installation of a temporary 
willow sapling sculpture by artist Patrick Dougherty and authorization to approve project 
implementation budget of $50,000: (1) South Park; (2) Oak Trees on Grove and Polk 
Street side of City Hall; and (3) other location to be identified. 

6. Patricia's Green - Temporary Sculpture Proposal 

Ms. Manton stated that she is working on a loan agreement for Tony Labat's "Peace 
Sign," to be temporarily installed on Patricia's Green. The agreement will include a fee to 
fabricate, install and deinstall a new sculpture, which costs as much as transporting and 
refurbishing the existing sculpture that the Arts Commission originally wished to borrow. 
The agreement will also provide the Arts Commission with the opportunity to extend the 
length of the installation, the ability to exhibit the work in another public venue, and the 
right to retain and accept the work into the Civic Art Collection if the Arts Commission so 
desires. Ms. Manton reminded Commissioners that Stanlee Gatti, former president of the 
Arts Commission, wanted to give the sculpture as a gift to the City for placement in the 
Pan Handle. Commissioner Przyblyski expressed her support for the project and the 
installation at Patricia's Green in Hayes Valley. Ms. Manton stated that she will determine 
the gage of the steel for the new work and how it will last through time and announced 
that Mr. Labat currently is working on an exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of 
Modern Art related to recruitment campaigns and Uncle Sam. 

Motion: Motion to approve a loan fee not to exceed $30,000 with Tony Labat for the 
installation of a peace sign sculpture at Patricia's Green. 
Moved: Johnston/Garcia-Nakata 

7. Academy of Sciences 

Ms. Manton reported on the completion of the installation of Maya Lin's "Where the Land 
Meets the Sea" at the California Academy of Sciences. The sculpture is installed at. a 
height of 15 feet and is attached to six columns and nine thin cables suspended from the 



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overhead glass and steel canopy. An interpretive plaque will be installed with includes a 
map with the section of the Bay Area that is represented in the sculpture. Tonight at 
7:30 pm, KQED will air an interview with Maya Lin about the sculpture, which will also 
include interviews with Commissioner Przyblyski and Academy scientists. The dedication 
of the sculpture will take place October 24th at 3:30 or 3:45 pm and will be coordinated 
with Maya Lin's exhibition opening at the de Young Museum. The dedication will take 
place right before the reception at the de Young Museum. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final installation of Where the Land Meets the Sea by 
Maya Lin for the California Academy of Sciences and authorization to accept the artwork 
into Civic Art Collection. 
Moved: Garcia-Nakata, Lloyd 

8. "Great Streets" Streetscape Improvement Projects - Leland Avenue 

Presentation of this item is postponed to the next Visual Arts Committee meeting. 

9. SOMA West Ancillary Improvement Projects 

Presentation of this item is postponed to the next Visual Arts Committee meeting. 

10. Arts Festival Exhibition at San Francisco International Airport 

Ms. Pontious presented the October 11, 2008 opening of the exhibition The Art of a City: 
The History of the San Francisco Arts Festival 1946-1986 at the San Francisco 
International Airport. She explained that the Arts Commission used budgeted monies 
from the City's general fund to purchase jury-selected works by local artists from the 
annual city-sponsored festival. The collection includes works by artists like Viola Frey, 
Robert Arneson and Peter Voulkos, and unique pieces of modernist jewelry. The 
exhibition will feature works that were purchased during this period and Ms. Pontious 
suggested holding a reception with the artists at the Airport. Commissioner Przyblyski 
and Mr. Cancel agreed that a reception in November would be a great idea. 

11. New Business 

Ms. Manton reported on her recommendation to the Transbay Joint Powers Authority 
staff to develop a public art program that uses the limited funding in a judicious way to 
make fewer, but more significant, statements. She explained that the Transbay Terminal 
senior staff and project architects seemed supportive of the idea of conducting an 
invitational competition in October for this first phase of projects. Mr. Cancel and 
Commissioner Przyblyski will serve as the Arts Commission designees on the Transbay Art 
Steering Committee. Ms. Manton also explained that a private office tower that provides 
the funding for the Transbay Center will be subject to the one percent for art in private 
development requirement and it's possible that part of this one percent could be used for 
programming public art for the City Park, which will be at the roof level of the Transbay 
Terminal or Mission Square between Mission Street and Transbay Terminal, or for the art 
budget for the permanent work in the Transbay Terminal. 

12. Old Business 



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There was no old business to report. 

13. Adjournment 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:03 pm. 

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San Francisco Arts Commission 



LISTEN 

TEXT ONLY 

PRINT 

A 

A 

A 



October 15, 2008 



10-1 I : 16 RCVD 



VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, October 15, 2008 

3:00 p.m. 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 

Agenda 



1. Consent Calendar 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

OCT 1 5 2008 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



1. Motion to approve a multiphase mural entitled "The Bayview is. 



." by artists 



Malik Seneferu and Heidi Hardin working in collaboration with Bayview Footprints and 
Quesada Garden Initiative. The mural is located at the intersection of Newhall and 
Bridgeview Streets. During this first phase, sun and bird imagery will visually divide the 
wall into five distinct sections and provide space for community artists and youth to 
add imagery pending funding and design approval from relevant parties. 

2. Motion to approve and to accept into the Civic Art Collection, the artwork consisting 
of 27 porcelain enamel panels with photographic images of blue water, completed in 
2008 by artist Catherine Wagner, installed on the east wall of the Larsen Park Sava 
Pool natatorium at 19th Avenue and Ulloa Street in the Sunset District. 

3. Motion to approve and accept into the Civic Art Collection the artwork consisting of 
four glass and stainless steel shutters, each shutter with five hand crafted tempered 
glass panels with flower imagery, completed in 2008 by artist Dana Zed, installed 
behind the front windows of the Portola Branch Library located at Bacon and 
Goettengen Streets in the Portola District. 

4. Motion to approve and accept into the Civic Art Collection the artwork Sun Spheres, 
consisting of three mosaic-covered spheres, measuring three feet, four feet, and five 
feet in diameter, respectively, completed in 2008 by artist Laurel True, installed on 
three corners of the intersection of Ocean and Granada Avenues in the Ocean View- 
Merced Heights-Ingleside District. 

5. Motion to approve the addition of the following arts professionals and community 
representatives to the Branch Library Improvement Artist Selection Panel: Kevin Chen, 
Gallery Director, Intersection for the Arts; Carrie Brewster, Director, Hearst Art Gallery, 



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St. Mary's College; Carrie Lederer, Director, Bedford Gallery; Sharon Wilchar, Artist 
and member of the Emeryville Public Art Advisory Committee; Michelle Seville, Cultural 
Arts Manager, City of Richmond; Karen Tsujimoto, Curator, Oakland Art Museum; and 
Amana Johnson, artist. 

6. Motion to approve the addition of the following arts professionals and community 
representatives to the Central Subway Artist Pool Selection Panel: Ellen Oh, Director of 
Kearny Street Workshop; Shiree Dyson, Director of Public Programs, Education, and 
Museum Exhibitions, Museum of the African Diaspora; Hou Hanru, Director of Public 
Programs, San Francisco Art Institute; and Ellen Magnin Newman, Union Square 
Association board member. 

7. Motion to approve honoraria in the amount of $200 to each artist participating in the 
Chinese video and photography exhibition taking place at the SFAC Gallery from 
February 13 through April 18, 2009. The artists include: Zhu Jia, Ni Haifeng, Lu 
Chunsheng, Shi Yong, Xu Zhen, Xing Danwen, Yang Zhenzhong, and Michael Zheng. 

2. Gallery - North Light Court Banner 

Meg Shiftier 

Brief update on the North Light Court Banner project, including the selected artist and 
budget issues. 

3. Gallery - 401 Van Ness 

Meg Shiffler 

Presentation of artists and proposed special events for the 2009 exhibition City of 
Glass, to be co-curated by Ferris Plock. 

Motion: Motion to approve an honorarium in the amount of $1000 to Ferris Plock for 
his contributions as co-curator of the City of Glass exhibition at the SFAC Gallery at 401 
Van Ness Avenue on view from May 1 to July 3, 2009. 

4. Central Subway 

Judy Moran 
Staff report 

Discussion of the final draft of the Artwork Goals and Guidelines sections of the Central 
Subway Arts Master Plan. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final draft of the Artwork Goals and Guidelines sections 
of the Central Subway Arts Master Plan. 

5. Philosopher's Walk 



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5. Philosopher's Walk 

Regina Almaguer/Peter Richards 

Report on the design development phase of the Philosopher's Walk by artists Peter 
Richards and Susan Schwartzenberg at McLaren Park. 

Motion: Motion to approve the design development phase of the Philosopher's Walk by 
Peter Richards and Susan Schwartzenberg at McLaren Park. 

6. Moscone Recreation Center 

Regina Almaguer 

Report on the conceptual design submitted by Kent Roberts for the Moscone Recreation 
Center. 

Motion: Motion to approve the conceptual design submitted by Kent Roberts for the 
Moscone Recreation Center, and to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter 
into contract with the artist for design development, fabrication, transportation, and 
installation of the artwork for an amount not to exceed $70,000. 

7. Randall Museum 

Regina Almaguer 

Presentation of the conceptual design submitted by artist Charles Sowers for the 
Randall Museum. 

Motion: Motion to approve the conceptual design submitted by Charles Sowers for the 
Randall Museum and to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract 
with the artist for design development, fabrication, transportation, and installation of 
the artwork for an amount not to exceed $100,000. 

8. San Francisco International Airport - Terminal Two 

Susan Pontious 

Report on the selection of artists Janet Echelman and Buster Kendall to design 
suspended artworks for Terminal Two of the San Francisco International Airport. Report 
on the selection of artists Linda Beaumont and Norie Sato as finalists for the glass 
faA§ade curtainwall of Terminal Two. Report on selection of a pre-qualified pool of 
artists for future opportunities at Terminal Two. 

Motion: Motion to approve the selection of artists Janet Echelman and Buster Kendall 
to design suspended artworks for Terminal Two of the San Francisco International 
Airport, and to pay each an honorarium of $2,000 for the conceptual design. 



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Motion: Motion to approve the selection of artists Linda Beaumont and Norie Sato as 
finalists for the glass facade curtainwall, and approval to pay each an honorarium of 
$2,000. 

Motion: Motion to approve the selection of a following pre-qualified pool of artists for 
future opportunities at Terminal Two of the San Francisco International Airport: Seyed 
Alavi, Terry Allen, Freya Bardell, Ron Baron, Dan Corson, Brian Goggin, Doug Hollis, 
Anna Murch, Jody Pinto, Wendy Ross, Charles Sowers, and May Sun. 

9. San Francisco International Airport - Secure Connector 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation of Bob Zoell's final design for glass panels for the Secure Connector of San 
Francisco International Airport. 

Motion: Motion to approve Bob Zoell's final design for glass panels for the Secure 
Connector at San Francisco International Airport. 

L0. Laguna Honda Hospital 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation of the design of Lewis deSoto's tapestries 1999 and 2003 & 2006 to be 
installed at Laguna Honda Hospital 

Motion: Motion to approve design of Lewis deSoto's tapestries 1999 and 2003 & 2006 
for Laguna Honda Hospital. 

LI. Civic Art Collection Inventory - Progress Report 

Susan Pontious 
Staff report 

Progress report on the status of the full inventory of the Civic Art Collection, including 
data from the completion of Phase I and the plans for Phases II and III. 

L2. Leland Avenue Streetscape Improvement (Great Streets) Project 

Tonia Macneil 
Staff report 

Presentation of a new public art opportunity generated by DPW's Leland Avenue 
Streetscape Improvement project, and request for approval of the site and scope of the 
artwork. 

Motion: Motion to approve the public art program for the Leland Avenue Streetscape 
Improvement Project. 



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i 

L3. City Hall Commemorative Bust Guidelines 

Jill Manton 

Report on the City Hall Commemorative Bust Guidelines. 

L4. Private Percent for Art Legislation 

Jill Manton 

Report on the Private Percent for Art Legislation. 

L5. Transbay Terminal Public Art Program 

Jill Manton 

Report on the progress of the Transbay Terminal Public Art Program. 

L6. Rabbi noid Relocation 

Jill Manton 

Report on the relocation of Gerald Heffernon's Rabbinoid. 

17. California Street Steps Proposal 

Jill Manton 

Report on the California Street Steps Proposal. 
L8. New Business 
L9. Old Business 
10. Adjournment 

MC 10/8/2008 

* 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts 

Commission office, 25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during 

regular business hours. INFO: Mary Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration 

of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic 

devices are prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the 

removal from the meeting of any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell 

phone, pager, or other similar sound-producing electronic devices. 



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Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or 
administrative action may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San 
Francisco Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to 
register and report lobbying activity. For more information about the Lobbyist 
Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 
Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 
htt p://www.sfgov.org/ethics. 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the 
public. Commissions, boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist 
to conduct the people's business. This ordinance assures that deliberations are 
conducted before the people and that City operations are open to the people's review. 
For more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report a 
violation of the ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, 
Sunshine Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San 
Francisco CA 94102-4689; by phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by 
email at sotf (9)sf gov. org. 



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Date: October 10, 2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Judy Moran 

Re: San Francisco Arts Commission Central Subway Public art Program Arts Master 
Plan 

DRAFT******DRAFT******DRAFT*****DRAFT 

Below is the final draft of the Goals and Guidelines sections of the Central 
Subway Arts Master Plan for review and approval by the Visual Arts 
Committee. 

San Francisco Arts Commission Central Subway Public Art Program 

Arts Master Plan 

The Central Subway Public Art Program Goals and Guidelines 

Central Subway Public Art Program Goals 

• To commission vibrant high quality works of art to reflect San Francisco's 
enduring commitment to the exceptional design of civic spaces. 

• To enhance the quality of transit riders' experience through a range of high 
quality, signature public artworks by both local and national artists. 

• To create a unique visual identity for each station, architecturally and culturally, 
by commissioning artworks that dramatically enliven the station interiors and 
reflect the diverse history and vitality of surrounding neighborhoods. 



• 



To develop artworks that will remain in excellent condition in a busy underground 
transit environment for many years through the use of durable materials and 
fabrication methods that allow for easy maintenance and are resistant to 
vandalism. 

To maintain ongoing neighborhood interest in the Central Subway Project and 
help to mitigate the impact of construction during the final design and 
construction phase through periodic temporary art and educational projects along 
the Central Subway corridor. 



• 



To engage new artists and maintain a fresh and lively environment in the Central 
Subway station following station completion through a rotating exhibition 
program at each station. 

Central Subway Public Art Program Guidelines 

The Arts Commission has developed the following guidelines for the Central Subway 
Public Art Program based on ideas expressed by the members of the Central Subway Arts 
Master Plan Advisory Group, community members in the Central Subway corridor 
neighborhoods, and the Arts Commission. 

These guidelines are based on the current plans and designs for the larger Central Subway 
Project. Changes in the Central Subway Project during the design development or 
construction phases may require adjustments in the artwork guidelines. For example, 
architectural or budgetary changes may affect the quantity, scale and locations, as well as 
the type of materials and fabrication methods, of the permanent artworks, and the scope 
and duration of the rotating exhibition program. Budgetary changes may also affect the 
number, frequency and size of the temporary community art projects and the extent of 
marketing and educational outreach, during the eight year design development and 
construction phases of the Central Subway Project. 

The Central Subway Public Art Program will include three components: 

1) Permanent public artworks 

a) In the subway stations and above ground areas adjacent to the station 

b) On the light rail platform at 4 th and Brannan 

2) A rotating exhibitions program in each of the three subway stations after the transit 
line begins operation 

3) A temporary projects program in each of the neighborhoods in the vicinity of the 
subway stations during the design development and construction phases of the Central 
Subway. 

The guidelines are intentionally more general and conceptual than prescriptive in terms of 
artwork sites, proposed content, and materials in order to allow the Artist Finalists 
selected for each station adequate leeway in developing preliminary artwork proposals, 
and for the Artist Selection Panels to have flexibility in determining the best locations, 
thematic approaches, and aesthetic criteria for the artwork at each station. 

The Central Subway Public Art Program will include permanent artworks by a diverse 
group of local and regional, emerging and more established artists working in a variety of 
media. In addition, the rotating exhibitions program will provide future generations of 
artists with the opportunity to have their artwork professionally displayed in the stations 
after operations begin in 2016. 

Artworks with a vital and enduring aesthetic will be commissioned to forge a unique 
identity for each station. Some artwork may reflect a station's neighborhood context, 
either historically or culturally, while avoiding cultural stereotypes, and others may be 



based on broader, more universal themes. Other artworks may provide a format or 
aesthetic, particularly at the entryway, that is consistent from station to station, helping 
forge a broader visual identity for the system as a whole. 

The Arts Commission will work with the SFMTA to coordinate the allocation of station 
spaces for advertising and spaces for artwork. It is the Arts Commission's objective to 
have this accord finalized in a written agreement with the SFMTA before artists begin 
developing proposals for each station. 

With several different artworks in each station, as well as SFMTA directional signage 
and advertising, careful planning and coordination is essential at the outset of the project 
in order to incorporate several artworks in each station in a cohesive and thoughtful 
manner. Appropriate placement, scale, media, and content must be balanced within the 
larger architectural, operational and cultural context of each station. A chaotic collection 
of jarring and disparate artworks in a complex visual environment is to be avoided. 

It is expected that each station will have artwork in a variety of appropriate media. All 
permanent artworks will be fabricated in durable, easily maintained materials, such as 
ceramic or glass tile or mosaics; metal, including stainless steel porcelain enamel; 
laminated glass, terrazzo, and concrete. The Arts Commission will consult with a 
conservator as part of the review and evaluation process for each artwork proposal prior 
to final selection. 

Subway Station Artwork Categories 

Each station will feature both several permanent artworks and a temporary rotating 
exhibitions program in designated station areas. Some permanent artworks will contribute 
to a station identity, others will provide a connecting series of artworks that run through 
two or more levels of the stations, and some artworks may have a consistent format at 
each of the three stations, such as a distinctive light element. The rotating exhibitions 
program will provide an ongoing series of dynamic artwork displays that reflect the 
changing cultural and aesthetic interests of the City over time after transit operations 
begin. 

1. Permanent Public Artworks 

A collection of several permanent public artworks in the following four categories 
will be developed for each of the three stations and adjacent areas as follows: 

a. A large significant artwork 

One large scale, vibrant and engaging artwork in each station will create a 
station identity and a landmark for the neighborhood. A prime location for 
a significant artwork might be the station entryways, or the large wall 
expanses on the concourse levels. 

b. A wavfinding artwork project 

An art project by one or more artists will extend through two or three of 
the station levels, providing a thread for pedestrians to follow through the 
station to help with wayfinding. Not necessarily one long linear artwork, 



the project could be a series of artworks that are thematically and 
aesthetically related, creating a second signature element that helps to 
guide passengers through the station. Such projects might also incorporate 
historical or cultural elements related to the station neighborhood. This art 
project could involve multiple artists working with a consistent theme and 
format. However, these artworks are not intended to replace MTA 
directional signage, but to create a distinctive visual language that is 
coordinated with, rather than replacing, signage and other MTA graphic 
material. 

Examples might include a series of art elements extending along walls 
next to the escalators, or along the floor or ceilings in the entryway and 
concourse levels. An artwork might begin outside the station as banners or 
light fixtures and continue into the entryway and down through the station 
in other media. Artworks could be two dimensional, such as tile or metal 
insets, or sculptural, with elements sited throughout the station. The glass 
walls of the elevators that continue from the entryway to the platform level 
could contain a laminated or sand-blasted art treatment as long as visibility 
into the interior of the elevators cars was not significantly impaired. 

c. Additional artworks within the stations 

Additional art opportunities might include more intimate elements, each 
distinct and sited in a smaller area. Functional elements, such as benches, 
might be designed by artists on the platforms or concourse areas, as well 
as railings on the concourse level of the Chinatown station. Station pillars 
could be covered with mosaics, each by a different artist. 

d. Artworks adjacent to the stations 

Artworks will be located in appropriate areas adjacent to the station 
entryways to assist in leading pedestrians to the entry levels of the 
stations. As previously stated, these artworks could extend into the 
stations, leading passengers through the stations as well. Examples of 
artworks might be banners on the streets approaching the stations, a large 
archway that spans an intersection, or an above-ground sculptural element 
at the entryways. 

Such artworks cannot be on private property which will restrict projects to 
publicly owned real estate. The FTA states that "Artistic undertakings that 
promote specific private or corporate business interests are ineligible for 
FTA funding." 

Plans for artwork at the entryway of the stations can only be finalized after 
a final determination has been made about the buildings that will house the 
entryways to the subways at the Chinatown and Moscone/Yerba Buena 
stations. This determination will not necessarily coincide with the design 
development and construction schedule of the Central Subway. 



2. Rotating Exhibitions 

The Arts Commission will establish a rotating exhibitions program at each station 
to provide an ongoing infusion of fresh artwork for station users and allow for 
future generations of artists to participate in the Central Subway Public Art 
Program after the stations begin operations in 2016. Such a program will also 
provide an opportunity to Central Subway corridor arts organizations to have a 
presence in the stations by curating exhibitions. 

The Arts Commission will work with the MTA to designate a dedicated rotating 
exhibition space in each station and to provide the necessary professional 
exhibition equipment, such as light boxes, display cases, LED boards or decals. 
The display equipment may be different from one station to another, or each 
station may have a combination of different types of equipment, but the location 
and equipment will be determined and installed at each station prior to the end of 
project construction. 

The rotating exhibitions program will be funded by a reserve, a set amount of the 
art enrichment budget to be used exclusively for this purpose, possibly for a five 
year period following the beginning of system operations. The Arts Commission 
is committed to the rotating exhibitions program as long as funding is available. 
Exploration of additional funding sources to extend the rotating exhibition 
program will be investigated. 

The rotating exhibition program may not be used for other purposes such as 
advertising or public service, but will be reserved exclusively for temporary art 
projects. 

As the rotating exhibitions program will not be implemented until 2016, the 
specific guidelines for the program will not be finally determined until closer to 
the end of construction. At this time, the Arts Commission is planning to 
determine exhibitions through an annual application process for San Francisco 
artists, nonprofit arts organization or nonprofit community organizations that have 
arts programming, such as a youth art program. A different artist or arts 
organization will be selected annually for each station, to work with the Arts 
Commission to curate one or more exhibitions. All exhibitions will need to be 
approved by the Arts Commission. 

The Arts Commission is working with the MTA to explore the possibility of 
dedicating a portion of the advertising delivery equipment for artwork. A 
challenge for such a program would be to create artworks that are distinctive 
enough not to be confused with the advertising. 

3. Temporary Art Projects 

The Arts Commission will conduct a temporary program of art activities 
throughout the eight year design development and construction phase of the 



Central Subway Project. This program will provide an additional investment in 
the Central Subway corridor neighborhoods, helping to mitigate the impact of the 
extensive multi-year City public works project. The program will allow for 
ongoing participation of artists, arts and other organizations, as well as the public, 
in the Central Subway Public Art Program. 

The program will initially sponsor approximately one temporary project per year, 
beginning in 2009, in one of the three Central Subway neighborhoods. Projects 
will be developed in the other two neighborhoods in the subsequent two years. 
Additional temporary projects may be scheduled annually depending on the 
availability of adequate resources. 

Projects will be selected through a competitive application process among artists, 
arts organizations or community organizations with an arts program along the 
Central Subway corridor. A two-tiered selection process will result in a short list 
of appropriate organizations selected and paid a stipend to develop proposals, one 
of which will be selected for implementation. 

Projects may include banners, bus wraps, posters, a cultural event, an art 
installation or a youth arts program, and may take place at any appropriate point 
along the Central Subway corridor, not just at the station locations. All temporary 
projects must reflect an aspect of the surrounding neighborhood and take place in 
a venue or venues that provide a maximum amount of broad public access. This 
program is not intended for a gallery or for exhibitions in existing nonprofit art 
spaces. 

3. Related Educational and Project Promotional Activities 

Throughout the design development and construction phases of the Central Subway 
Project, the Arts Commission will sponsor educational and promotional activities in the 
Central Subway neighborhoods. Such activities will include community presentations by 
those artists selected to create artwork for the Central Subway; public infonnational 
displays of artwork proposals; and brochures and posters about the Central Subway 
Public Art Program, among others. 






Date: October 10, 2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Susan Pontious 

Re: Civic Art Collection Inventory - Wall to Wall: Progress Report 



One of the primary mandated responsibilities of managing the city's art collection is 
preserving and caring for those objects. Accountability for objects is a significant part of 
that care. A major goal of the Civic Art Collection Program is to complete an inventory 
of the entire collection. This is a several year, multi-phase project. 

To date, no full inventory has ever been completed in the history of the Civic Art 
Collection, although several attempts have been made. Art collection inventories are 
ambitious projects, and require a staffing level that has been absent from the Arts 
Commission for many years. 

A full inventory of the San Francisco Civic Art Collection is particularly challenging due 
to the high number of "portable" works that have been loaned out to city departments 
since the early 1950's. Tracking artwork in a loan program such as this requires a 
diligence through adequate staffing and funding that the Arts Commission has struggled 
to provide. As a result, an inventory of these works requires an analysis of contradictory 
location records contained within our hard files as well as our electronic database, and 
sleuthing loans that are attached to city staff that are no longer employed with their 
respective departments or whose offices have relocated over the years. 

• There are approximately 3,200 objects in the Civic Art Collection. 

• 1,396 of these objects are catalogued in our database with unlisted locations. 

• An additional 754 objects are listed as on loan to 183 different city agencies and 
offices. 

Phase I - Completed FY07/08 

Location: San Francisco General Hospital 

STATS: 

• The San Francisco General Hospital inventory took 1 staff member approximately 
1 year to complete, dedicating 20% of their time to the project while working on 
concurrent assignments. 

• 169 objects were thought to be located at SFGH and 81 of these artworks have 
been accounted for as a result of the inventory. 

• 44 of the located works were removed from the hospital basement, and are stored 
at Brooks Hall. 

Locations: SFAC controlled storage spaces at Suite 60 (25 Van Ness Ave.) and Brooks 
Hall (Civic Center) 



Pagel 10/10/2008 



STATS: 



The Suite 60 and Brooks Hall inventories took 2 staff members approximately 6 

months to complete, dedicating 40% of their time to the project while working on 

concurrent assignments. 

487 objects were listed in EmbARK as being in Suite 60 prior to the 2008 

inventory 

624 clearly accessioned artworks have been accounted for in Suite 60; meaning 

137 previously missing works have been located. 

Brooks Hall provides storage for 128 artworks. 

80% of the artwork in storage needed identification photographs taken and 

entered into our database. 



PROCESS: 



• 



Each storage space was approached systematically, beginning with arranging a 
numbering system for the existing storage furniture (the bins, racks, and drawers) 
as no formalized approach to the organization of the storage spaces had 
previously been arranged. 

• Each artwork in the storage space was then given a condition assessment, checked 
that it was labeled properly, measured, photographed, its specific location 
recorded, re-packed in archival housing, and labeled on the exterior of the 
packaging. 

• Inventory data was then reconciled with EmbARK - involving making location 
changes, adding images to records, entering condition notes, and correcting data 
mistakes left over from when the database was upgraded several years ago. 

Phase II - Scheduled completion end of FY09/10 

Locations: Department of Public Health including General Hospital, the Mental Health 
Rehab Facility, Health Clinics, and administrative offices. Inventory the Hall of Justice 
and the Branch Library's. 

Phase II goals for FY08/09 include the completion of the Health Department inventory, 
and giving priority to confirming the location of artworks in the collection of high merit. 
We will also begin the entry of loan data from existing paper files into EmbARK in order 
to establish loan chronologies from which to begin the tracking of objects. 



STATS: 



There are 161 objects listed as on loan to DPH buildings, programs, and offices, 
including SFGH and 19 satellite health centers. 

There are 83 objects listed as on loan to the Hall of Justice (850 Bryant), and 47 
objects on loan to police stations, Police Academy and Sheriffs facility. 
There are 19 objects listed as on loan to SFPL throughout 8 branches. 



COMMENT: 



Page 2 10/10/2008 



Phase II presents unique challenges and requires more detailed coordination than Phase I. 
We are inventorying spaces that we do not have control over or continued access too, 
therefore cannot freeze potential movement of objects, as would be done in other 
inventory initiatives. Scant location records will require Collections staff to conduct 
thorough walk-throughs of each office (including internal offices, closets, etc.). This is a 
delicate operation and requires making contact with a staff person within the department 
and scheduling time to enter the space. Several of the departments, including the Hall of 
Justice and the Mental Health Facility, require security escort. In addition, a number of 
our records lack photographic documentation, necessitating careful comparison to catalog 
information during the on-site inventory process. Fortunately, many pieces bear an 
identifying SFAC label on their reverse, but mounting hardware and size often requires 
assistance in removing them from the wall for inspection. 

Phase III 

Locations: City Hall, Public Art Projects, Monuments, and various remaining locations. 



Page 3 



10/10/2008 



DATE: 
TO: 
FROM: 
RE: 



October 10, 2008 

Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 
Tonia Macneil 
NEW PROJECTS 



Project: Leland Avenue (Liveable Cities Great Streets Project) 

Location: Leland Avenue at Bayshore Boulevard, Visitation Valley 

Budget: Art Enrichment Allocation: $56,000 Artist's Budget: $38,000 

Artist: To Be Determined 

Leland Avenue 

Leland Avenue is a four-block commercial street that is the civic heart of Visitation Valley, a 
neighborhood of small bungalows in the Southeastern part of the City. The once-ignored 
neighborhood is now on the map largely due to the work of community members over the last 
twelve years, who have created a true civic treasure in the Visitation Valley Greenway, which 
begins at Leland Avenue Construction will start soon on a new library, the new T-Third Line is 
now running and a 20- acre parcel directly across from the intersection of Leland Avenue and 
Bayshore is scheduled for redevelopment with housing, businesses, and a link to the nearby Cal- 
Train Station. In sum, Leland Avenue is in the midst of a major renaissance. 

Creating a sense of arrival at the intersection of Leland Avenue and Bayshore is the primary 
goal of the Community and the Department of Public Works (DPW). A secondary choice is on 
the avenue itself adjacent to the entrance to the Greenway. 

Public Art Program 

As of this writing, we propose that the artwork be located on the Southwest corner of Leland and 
Bayshore Boulevard. In addition to being a free-standing sculpture, the artwork would serve 
both as an entrance beacon and, possibly, as a light fixture at night. The T-Third line stops in the 
center divider of Bayshore and a Muni bus stops at Leland. Drivers traveling the southbound 
lanes of Bayshore are naturally drawn to look at that corner. DPW has committed to providing 
the concrete base from which the artwork would rise, which will greatly enhance the possibilities 
available to an artist. Discussions are currently underway with Muni and with DPW to be sure 
that the site is available and relatively clear of visual clutter. In the event that we are unable to 
reach agreement, the second choice will be presented. 

Requested Action: Motion to approve a public art program (to be determined at the meeting) 
for the Leland Avenue Improvement Project. 



sfcfc: October 15, 2008 Page 1 of 13 



San Francisco Arts Commission 

LISTE N 
TEXT ONLY 
PRINT 

A 
A 
A 

October 15, 2008 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, October 15, 2008 
3:00 p.m. 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 
Minutes 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 



Commissioners Present: 

PJ Johnston, Lorraine Garcia-Nakata, Alex Lloyd OCT 2 8 2008 

Absent: Jeannene Przyblyski, Dede Wilsey o^ FRANCISCO 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 
Staff Present: 

Regina Almaguer, Mary Chou, Allison Cummings, Marcus Davies, Jill Manton, Judy 

Moran, Susan Pontious, Meg Shiffler 

Note: All votes are unanimous unless recorded otherwise. 

The meeting commenced at 3:05 p.m. 
Consent Calendar 

1. Motion to approve a multiphase mural entitled "The Bayview is " by artists 

Malik Seneferu and Heidi Hardin working in collaboration with Bayview Footprints and 
Quesada Garden Initiative. The mural is located at the intersection of Newhall and 
Bridgeview Streets. During this first phase, sun and bird imagery will visually divide the 
wall into five distinct sections and provide space for community artists and youth to 
add imagery pending funding and design approval from relevant parties. 

2. Motion to approve and to accept into the Civic Art Collection, the artwork Swimmers' 
Waves, consisting of 27 porcelain enamel panels with photographic images of blue 
water, completed in 2008 by artist Catherine Wagner, installed on the east wall of the 
Larsen Park Sava Pool natatorium at 19th Avenue and Ulloa Street in the Sunset 
District. 

3. Motion to approve and accept into the Civic Art Collection the artwork California 
Wildf lowers, consisting of four glass and stainless steel shutters, each shutter with five 
hand crafted tempered glass panels with flower imagery, completed in 2008 by artist 
Dana Zed, installed behind the front windows of the Portola Branch Library located at 
Bacon and Goettengen Streets in the Portola District. 



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sfac: October 15, 2008 Page 2 or 13 



4. Motion to approve and accept into the Civic Art Collection the artwork Sun Spheres, 
consisting of three mosaic-covered spheres, measuring three feet, four feet, and five 
feet in diameter, respectively, completed in 2008 by artist Laurel True, installed on 
three corners of the intersection of Ocean and Granada Avenues in the Ocean View- 
Merced Heights-Ingleside District. 

5. Motion to approve the addition of the following arts professionals and community 
representatives to the Branch Library Improvement Artist Selection Panel: Kevin Chen, 
Gallery Director, Intersection for the Arts; Carrie Brewster, Director, Hearst Art Gallery, 
St. Mary's College; Carrie Lederer, Director, Bedford Gallery; Sharon Wilchar, Artist 
and member of the Emeryville Public Art Advisory Committee; Michelle Seville, Cultural 
Arts Manager, City of Richmond; Karen Tsujimoto, Curator, Oakland Art Museum; and 
Amana Johnson, artist. 

6. Motion to approve the addition of the following arts professionals and community 
representatives to the Central Subway Artist Pool Selection Panel: Ellen Oh, Director of 
Kearny Street Workshop; Shiree Dyson, Director of Public Programs, Education, and 
Museum Exhibitions, Museum of the African Diaspora; Hou Hanru, Director of Public 
Programs, San Francisco Art Institute; and Ellen Magnin Newman, Union Square 
Association board member. 

7. Motion to approve honoraria in the amount of $200 to each artist participating in the 
Chinese video and photography exhibition taking place at the SFAC Gallery from 
February 13 through April 18, 2009. The artists include: Zhu Jia, Ni Haifeng, Lu 
Chunsheng, Shi Yong, Xu Zhen, Xing Danwen, Yang Zhenzhong, and Michael Zheng. 

Motion: Motion to adopt the consent calendar items. 
Moved: Lloyd/Garcia-Nakata 

Gallery - North Light Court Banner 

Gallery Director Meg Shiffler explained that due to gallery budget cuts this fiscal year, 
the Gallery will raise funds to organize the next North Light Court Banner exhibition. 
She stated that she will first select an artist for the exhibition, then begin fundraising 
efforts. Ms. Shiffler presented artist Christina Seely and a recent series of her works 
called Lux. The series consists of photographs of the three brightest spots on the globe 
from space; the artist is interested in the loss of darkness. Ms. Shiffler will ask the 
artist to create a new image of San Francisco, to be exhibited alongside existing 
photographs of other cities. The images will encourage people to think about the City 
and its relationship to the rest of the world. She also stated that she will work with the 
Public Utilities Commission ("PUC") and other city agencies to create programming 
related to the topic of light and its impact on energy resources. Ms. Shiffler explained 
that this work also takes into consideration the Mayor's goals towards making the City 
a world leader in city greening. 



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Commissioners expressed their support for the proposed artist and project and noted 
that light output has been found to be directly related to carbon emissions. Ms. Shiffler 
stated that she would raise $15,000 for this project, which includes $2,500 for the 
artist and $1,000 to print each of the ten banners. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata asked 
if Ms. Shiffler had spoken to PG&E regarding fundraising and Ms. Shiffler responded 
that she had not yet started to solicit funds but would take the suggestion into 
consideration. 

Commissioner Johnston stated that the current exhibition of Lonnie Graham's work is 
powerful and has a great impact in City Hall. Ms. Shiffler stated that she plans to meet 
with the City Hall Events Department to ensure that the installation and de-installation 
of the covers placed in front of the banners during events do not harm the artwork. 

3. Gallery - 401 Van Ness 

Ms. Shiffler presented artists for the 2009 exhibition City of Glass, to be co-curated by 
Ferris Plock. The exhibition takes as its starting point Paul Auster's story "City of 
Glass," which was also published as a graphic novel in 2004. The book includes tales 
about the City of New York and themes that include hidden codes in the urban 
environment, the way history is pieced together, and the ease in which people can 
disappear in cities. Ms. Shiffler will ask eight to ten local artists to create new work for 
the exhibition based on these themes; each artist will be allocated a certain amount of 
space for their work. She then showed images of the works of artists proposed for the 
exhibition: Deth P. Sun, Doze Green, Clare Rojas, Mike Davis, Casey Jex Smith, Dan 
Nakamura, Ferris Plock and Kelly Tunstall, Michelle Blade, Marci Washington, 
Hamburger Eyes, and Maya Hayak for the Grove Street site. Ms. Shiffler stated that 
these artists have a comics, graffiti, illustration and fine art background, and are shown 
in galleries such as Shooting Gallery and Park Life Gallery in San Francisco. She stated 
that the exhibition includes a group of young, lively and energetic artists who will 
attract a new audience to the Gallery. Ms. Shiffler explained that she has not yet 
entered into contract with these artists. 

Motion: Motion to approve an honorarium in the amount of $1000 to Ferris Plock for 
his contributions as co-curator of the City of Glass exhibition at the SFAC Gallery at 401 
Van Ness Avenue on view from May 1 to July 3, 2009. 
Moved: Garcia-Nakata/Lloyd 

4. Central Subway 

Project Manager Judy Moran stated that she had sent the final draft of the Artwork 
Goals and Guidelines section of the Central Subway Arts Master Plan to Commissioners 
last week for their review and she is looking for their input and feedback on the 
document. 

Commissioner Johnston stated that the document successfully incorporated the issues 



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discussed during the last Visual Arts Committee meeting and suggested Ms. Moran 
contact Commissioner Przyblyski, who is absent from this meeting, for her comments 
before final approval during Full Commission in November. Ms. Moran responded that 
she would contact Commissioner Przyblyski for her comments. Commissioner Garcia- 
Nakata also stated that the final draft was comprehensive and included her specific 
concerns about fundraising. 

Commissioner Johnston stated that he is still concerned that the building that will 
house the entrance to the Chinatown station has not yet been determined, especially 
since the Chinatown community is interested in artwork that is located at the entrance 
to the station. Commissioner Lloyd expressed his concern about how the artwork would 
interact with the advertisements in the stations, both in terms of placement and 
technology. Ms. Moran explained that she has begun discussions with MUNI regarding 
this issue and the Arts Commission will work with MUNI to develop a plan for the 
location of the artwork and the advertising. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final draft of the Artwork Goals and Guidelines sections 
of the Central Subway Arts Master Plan. 
Moved: Lloyd/Garcia-Nakata 

Philosopher's Walk 

Project Manager Regina Almaguer presented the artist team of Peter Richards and 
Susan Schwartzenberg to describe the design development phase of their work 
Philosopher's Walk at McLaren Park. Mr. Richards explained that his inspiration for the 
artwork came from his walks through McLaren Park with its intimate wooded areas to 
its wide vistas; its diversity of users ranging from dog walkers to people practicing tai 
chi; and its year-round creeks with redwood groves and a recently restored pond. Ms. 
Schwartzenberg explained that philosophers' walks appear in many cities ranging from 
Toronto to Heidelberg. She stated that based on community meetings, it was clear that 
the community wanted art but did not want the artwork to change the ecology of the 
park. The artists proposed art elements that would enhance the existing trails by 
creating better connections between the trails and by repositioning stones to be used 
as seating at vista points that provide views of the Bay Area. 

Mr. Richards explained that the locations of the trail connections and seating areas 
were mapped out during a community meeting in June, which included the artist team 
with collaborator George Gonzales, who will build the benches and signposts, and 
community members including Franco Mancini, spokesperson for the Friends of 
McLaren Park. The artists will hire a cartographer to map out the paths upon which the 
trail markers and benches will be sited.. Ms. Schwartzenberg showed samples of the 
designs of the benches and explained that the Department of Public Works ("DPW") has 
a supply of granite curbstones at Candlestick Park that the artists will use for the 
benches and signposts. The design of the benches and posts will be dictated by the 
shape of the granite stones. The artists also showed a conceptual rendering of a sign 



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post with a photo-transfer on a piece of polished black granite. The trail markers will 
consist of shorter granite stones that mark the trails. The next step will include the 
development of stories, quotes, and musings with the community as well as the 
selection of photographs. The map will be placed on a series of city websites, and a 
trail stabilization plan will be developed in partnership with volunteer groups. 

Commissioner Johnston stated that Mohammed Nuru of DPW might be helpful with the 
development of the trail stabilization plan. Commissioner Lloyd asked the artists what 
kind of content would be printed on the sign posts. Mr. Richards responded that the 
imagery and text would reflect the diversity of the surrounding neighborhoods and help 
people become more aware of their immediate surroundings as well as their place 
within the context of the larger Bay Area. Ms. Schwartzenberg also explained that the 
neighborhood had changed a lot over time - languages from all over the world are 
spoken in the neighborhood - and quotes by authors such as Thoreau and Jane Jacobs 
would be included on the signposts. 

Commissioner Garcia-Nakata stated that she enjoys the fact that the artwork is 
reflective and takes into account the context of the surrounding land and the way in 
which the artists engaged the community during the inception of the artwork. She 
recommended artist engage members of the African American community in the 
neighborhood and also that the quotes of philosophers come from a diverse source and 
not only include one genre of philosophical thinking. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata 
stated that such an approach would give the diverse communities a sense of ownership 
over the work; she enjoyed the universal nature of the work. 

Commissioner Johnston stated that the ability to view the Bay Area in all four directions 
and to see major sites in the area makes the park a special area; he also expressed his 
support for the project and for integrating the map onto the city's websites. 
Commissioner Lloyd encouraged artists to promote their work and expressed his 
support for the design of the benches and signposts. 

Motion: Motion to approve the design development phase of the Philosopher's Walk by 
Peter Richards and Susan Schwartzenberg at McLaren Park. 
Moved: Garcia-Nakata/Lloyd 

Moscone Recreation Center 

Ms. Almaguer presented the conceptual design submitted by Kent Roberts for the 
Moscone Recreation Center. The design is a ship-like steel structure with concrete 
"wake" pavers that are flush with the grass and a potential bed of river rock that will lie 
under the base of the steel structure. The length of the sculpture, including the 
concrete trail, is about 57 feet and the height is just over 5 feet. The sculpture will be 
located off of Laguna Street, between Francisco and Bay Streets. Ms. Almaguer 
explained that she will work with the Recreation and Park Department regarding safety 
and maintenance issues during the design development phase. Ms. Manton explained 



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that the funding for the public art project was generated from the renovation of the 
Moscone Recreation Center. 

Motion: Motion to approve the conceptual design submitted by Kent Roberts for the 
Moscone Recreation Center, and to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter 
into contract with the artist for design development, fabrication, transportation, and 
installation of the artwork for an amount not to exceed $70,000. 
Moved: Garcia-Nakata/Lloyd 

7. Randall Museum 

Ms. Almaguer explained that two of the three finalists for the Randall Museum project 
were asked to revise their proposals. The artists included Charles Sowers and the artist 
team of Wang Po Shu and Louise Bertelesen. The selection panel reconvened to review 
the proposals and recommended the proposal by Charles Sowers titled Windswept, 
which consists of wind vanes that will be attach to a bare exterior wall of the Randall 
Museum and which will become animated by the wind. 

Commissioner Garcia-Nakata stated that the kinetic aspect of the work is wonderful but 
recommended that the wind vanes be tested at the particular site to make sure they 
will move as intended. Ms. Almaguer stated that the artist has completed tests, but 
agreed that the installation of some wind vanes on the proposed wall of the museum to 
test the effects would be a good idea. Ms. Manton stated that the artist also plans to 
conduct workshops with children. 

Commissioner Johnston explained that when the Valencia Gardens were being rebuilt, 
the Arts Commission temporarily housed sculptures by Beniamo Bufano at the Randall 
Museum. When the sculptures were returned to Valencia Gardens, Supervisor Bevan 
Dufty worked with the staff at the Randall Museum, the Arts Commission, and the PUC 
to have public artwork installed at the Randall. 

Motion: Motion to approve the conceptual design submitted by Charles Sowers for the 
Randall Museum and to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract 
with the artist for design development, fabrication, transportation, and installation of 
the artwork for an amount not to exceed $100,000. 
Moved: Garcia-Nakata/Lloyd 

8. San Francisco International Airport - Terminal Two 

Public Art Program Deputy Director Susan Pontious reported on the selection of artists 
to prepare proposals for the new Terminal Two at San Francisco International Airport. 
Ms. Pontious explained that the design of the new terminal is on the fast track and 
therefore provides a very limited time period for the development of artworks that will 
•be integrated into the architecture of the new terminal. The deadline for finishing the 
design is February 1, 2009. She stated that when she first met with the architects, they 
had already developed design concepts for where the art should be located. Ms. 



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Pontious explained that the Arts Commission agreed with the architect's 
recommendations for the location of the artworks, and the selection of artists was 
based not only on their aesthetics but also their experience creating works of such size 
and scale. Given the tight timeframe, there was not an opportunity to have an artist 
unfamiliar with the public art process to create a work for the new terminal. 

Ms. Pontious presented images of the artwork sites in the new Terminal Two. The first 
site is on the glass facade of the terminal with a fritted design to protect the ticket 
agents from the glare of the sun on either side of the pedestrian bridge. Sites in the 
interior of the terminal include the Ticketing Area with room for an overhead work that 
leads people into the Security Area and the Recomposure Area for a suspended work. 
Other interior locations for artworks include the gaterooms which are open and 
resemble a lobby; the fractured ceilings in the gateroom may change if there is not 
enough funding. Ms. Pontious explained that the project was advertised through 
mailings and through the posting of the call on CaFE, an online application process 
used by the Arts Commission. The Arts Commission received 530 applications and the 
work was first prescreened by curatorial consultant Chandra Cerrito and then Ms. 
Pontious, before the works were presented to the panel. 

Ms. Pontious presented images of past works by artists Janet Echelman and Buster 
Kendall who were selected to design suspended artworks for the new terminal and 
images of past works by artists Linda Beaumont and Norie Sato as finalists for the 
glass facade curtainwall for the new terminal. She also presented the work of artist 
Charles Sowers for a prequalified pool of artists for works placed in the waiting area. 

Commissioner Garcia-Nakata, who served as a juror on the selection panel stated that 
there were a lot of strong artists in the pool but with the understanding that the project 
is on the fast track and already in the design development phase, she felt comfortable 
with the selection and the way that the past works of the selected artists fit with the 
vision of the new terminal. Commissioner Lloyd agreed that the works of the selected 
artists matched well with the architectural design of the space. 

Commissioner Johnston asked for public comment regarding this item. 

Dan Macchiarini, on behalf of the Art and Culture Committee of the Telegraph Hill 
Dwellers, introduced himself and stated that he found it difficult to understand how a 
selection of artists could be made without a design proposal. He then read a letter 
expressing frustration that none of the four finalists selected for Terminal Two were 
from San Francisco. He concluded by asking the Visual Arts Committee to reject or 
amend the current recommendation of artist for Terminal Two until a process is 
implemented to ensure greater inclusion of San Francisco based artists. He stated that 
the Arts Commission should form an internal policy to ensure more San Francisco 
artists receive contracts to create public artworks. 



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In response, Commissioner Johnston stated that he has heard this issue presented on 
several occasions and was not impressed with argument. Public Art Program Director 
Jill Manton stated that of the 25 recent contracts, 96 percent were awarded to San 
Francisco Bay Area artists; of that group, 56 percent reside in San Francisco. She 
explained that the Arts Commission typically limits the award of commissions for 
neighborhood projects such as libraries and recreation centers only to San Francisco 
Bay Area artists. The Art on Market Street poster series is only open to San Francisco 
artists and almost three-quarters of the artists selected for the International Terminal 
were local artists. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata stated that the airport has a long 
history of major projects completed by artists of color as well, but she thanked Mr. 
Macchiarini for presenting his argument and the letter at the Visual Arts Committee 
meeting. 

Motion: Motion to approve the selection of artists Janet Echelman and Buster Kendall 
to design suspended artworks for Terminal Two of the San Francisco International 
Airport, and to pay each an honorarium of $2,000 for the conceptual design. 
Moved: Lloyd/Garcia-Nakata 

Motion: Motion to approve the selection of artists Linda Beaumont and Norie Sato as 

finalists for the glass facade curtainwall, and approval to pay each an honorarium of 

$2,000. 

Moved: Lloyd/Garcia-Nakata 

THIS MOTION HAS BEEN POSTPONED 

Motion: Motion to approve the selection of a following pre-qualified pool of artists for 
future opportunities at Terminal Two of the San Francisco International Airport: Seyed 
Alavi, Terry Allen, Freya Bardell, Ron Baron, Dan Corson, Brian Goggin, Doug Hollis, 
Anna Murch, Jody Pinto, Wendy Ross, Charles Sowers, and May Sun. 

San Francisco International Airport - Secure Connector 

Ms. Pontious presented images and samples of Bob Zoell's final design for the glass 
panels for the Secure Connector at San Francisco International Airport. The work will 
consist of lightly frosted translucent glass panels with colorful designs depicting birds 
and typography that extend 80 feet along either side of the connector. Ms. Pontious 
explained that the color panels will be fabricated in Germany in order to achieve a 
richness in color. Sand-blasted glass panels will frame the top of the bottom of the 
large color panels with a similar pattern. Wall niches with eight by eight foot glass 
panels will have a black background with white images. Ms. Pontious explained that the 
artist is also a print-setter and grew up playing with typography. Mr. Zoell has created 
numerous covers for the New Yorker magazine and the image of birds is a recurring 
element in his work. 

Commissioner Garcia-Nakata stated that the artwork is a nice combination of design 
and story-telling. 



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Motion: Motion to approve Bob Zoell's final design for glass panels for the Secure 
Connector at San Francisco International Airport. 
Moved: Garcia-Nakata/Lloyd 

L0. Laguna Honda Hospital 

Ms. Pontious presented the design of Lewis deSoto's tapestries 1999 and 2003 & 2006 
to be installed at Laguna Honda Hospital. She explained that the series consists of 
sixteen tapestries with the history of Laguna Honda Hospital, which was established in 
the mid-1800s. Mr. deSoto has completed the first twelve and is now working on the 
remaining four for the new hospital. The tapestry titled 1999 depicts newspaper 
clippings regarding the passage of Proposition A for the rebuilding of Laguna Honda 
Hospital with 73 percent of the vote. The tapestry includes an image of City Attorney 
Louise Renne and a depiction of her in a cartoon by Phil Frank. The tapestry titled 2003 
& 2006 depicts the groundbreaking for the new building and images of construction. 
Ms. Pontious explained that the images are carefully pieced together with Photoshop 
and the tapestries are woven in Belgium with a computer program that allows for a 
complex blending of colors to create a photographic effect. The dimensions for each 
tapestry are four by seven feet. The image of a campaign button will be included on 
the tapestry entitled 1999. The final two tapestries will celebrate the dedication of the 
completed hospital. 

Motion: Motion to approve design of Lewis deSoto's tapestries 1999 and 2003 & 2006 
for Laguna Honda Hospital. 
Moved: Lloyd/Garcia-Nakata 

LI. Civic Art Collection Inventory - Progress Report 

Ms. Pontious referred Commissioners to a staff report that includes the progress made 
on the full inventory of the Civic Art Collection, including data from the completion of 
Phase I and the plans for Phases II and III. Ms. Pontious emphasized the importance of 
completing the inventory, which includes locating and documenting all the works in the 
collection. She also stated that once the inventory is complete, the Arts Commission 
can consider reinstating its loan program, which the Commission suspended when 
former Collections Manager Debra Lehane retired. 

L2. Leland Avenue Streetscape Improvement (Great Streets) Project 

Project Manager Tonia Macneil presented the program for a new public art opportunity 
generated by DPW's Leland Avenue Streetscape Improvement project. She distributed 
plans to the Commissioners and screened images of the street, explaining that the 
community would like to have a free-standing sculpture at the corner of Leland and 
Bayshore Boulevard. According to DPW planners, the community is interested in 
creating a sense of destination at this intersection and would like the artwork to have 
some relationship to the recently completed Visitacion Valley Greenway, with 
sculptures and mosaics by Fran Martin and Jim Growden, which has been more than 



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ten years in the making and extends six blocks up an adjacent hillside. Ms. Macneil 
noted that the improvements to Leland Avenue will include new lighting, seating areas, 
a bulbed-out sidewalk, and deciduous trees on the sidewalk. Another possible site for 
artwork would be at the entrance to the Greenway, at the intersection of Leland and 
Peabody. Ms. Macneil introduced Adam Varat of the Planning Department who was 
available for questions. Ms. Macneil showed an example of the type of work that might 
be appropriate for the site: a columnar light fixture created with a tile base that would 
resist graffiti. Ms. Macneil requested approval from the Commissioners to proceed with 
the project. 

Ms. Macneil stated that the budget is $38,000 for the design and installation of the 
artwork, and DPW has provisionally committed to providing the concrete base for the 
artwork. Commissioner Johnston inquired about the bulbed-out sidewalk and how that 
would affect traffic at the intersection of Leland and Bayshore Boulevard. Mr. Varat 
explained that there are a few parking spaces that will be removed to prevent 
congestion. Ms. Macneil indicated that the timeline for the selection of an artwork for 
the site is tight. Arts Commission staff will need to convene a community meeting 
within the next month to confirm the artwork location and obtain their input. 
Community response will be a factor in determining the final location of the artwork. 
Commissioner Johnston acknowledged the need to consult with the community and 
honor their strong opinions if possible. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata emphasized the 
importance of informing the community of the limited possibilities due to the size of the 
budget. 

Motion: Motion to approve the public art program for the Leland Avenue Streetscape 
Improvement Project. 
Moved: Garcia-Nakata/Lloyd 

L3. City Hall Commemorative Bust Guidelines 

Ms. Manton distributed a draft of the City Hall Commemorative Bust Guidelines and 
presented some of the major points in the guidelines. She began by stating that the 
only gift of artwork that will be considered for placement in City Hall will be 
commemorative busts of either an elected official or someone whose contribution to 
the history of the city are well documented. Any recommendations regarding the 
placement, removal or relocation of a bust will be reviewed with the Mayor's Office. In 
addition, the Arts Commission will require a $5,000 maintenance reserve for each new 
bust. When possible, the Arts Commission will make its best effort to communicate 
with the family and relatives of the official honored by the bust if the bust needs to be 
relocated. In order to achieve consistency in style and look, the pedestals of the busts 
will be stone and the bust itself will be made of bronze; in addition, the pedestals will 
be clad on all four sides. Ms. Manton also stated that the Mayor's Rotunda will be 
reserved for the busts of individuals who have served as Mayor of the City and County 
of San Francisco; similarly, the Board of Supervisor's Ceremonial Rotunda will be 
reserved for individuals who served as a member of the Board of Supervisors for the 



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City and County of San Francisco. 

Commissioner Johnston stated that the guidelines reflect common sense. While he has 
some reluctance over introducing a new set of guidelines that involve the Mayor's 
Office as well as the City Hall Preservation Advisory Commission, he is aware that not 
having the guidelines makes the Arts Commission vulnerable to criticism. 
Commissioner Johnston continued to say that he does take issue with reserving the 
Mayor's Rotunda and the Board of Supervisor's Ceremonial Rotunda strictly for 
individuals who served as a Mayor and Supervisor. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata 
agreed that the guidelines do not need to be so specific. She stated that there should 
be fewer guidelines, but simplified and broader. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata also 
suggested that the language regarding a maintenance endowment should be revised to 
include a reserve, in addition to an endowment. 

L4. Private Percent for Art Legislation 

Ms. Manton reported on the progress of the proposed amendments to the Private 
Percent for Art Legislation. She stated that she met with John Rahaim, Director of City 
Planning, Susan Cleveland-Knowles, Deputy City Attorney, Larry Badiner, Zoning 
Administrator, AnMarie Rodgers, Manager of Legislative Affairs, with Mike Farrah, 
Director of the Mayor's Office of Neighborhood Services, participating via telephone. 
Ms. Manton stated that the proposed legislation involves the one percent for art 
requirement for private developers in the Downtown C-3 District and responds to the 
Mayor's desire to improve the quality of commissioned artworks in public spaces. She 
stated that private developers currently have the option to spend the one percent for 
art requirement in a publicly accessible location on their property, in an adjacent public 
space, or towards the restoration of the Mint. Arts Commission staff joined the Mayor's 
staff in meeting with private developers to hear their concerns and interests in the 
development of this legislation. The first component consists of aesthetic oversight by 
the Arts Commission of the artwork selected by private developers for their properties 
in the C-3 downtown district. The Arts Commission would be required to comment 
within 60 days of submission and the Arts Commission would charge a reasonable 
administrative flat fee for the consultation and review of the proposed artworks. She 
reported that Mr. Rahaim was concerned about the additional work that would be 
required of private developers interested in creating a public artwork for the space. 

Ms. Manton continued to say that after 9/11, the lobbies of buildings are no longer 
considered public spaces. As a result private developers are limited in the spaces where 
they can place an artwork. The new legislation would provide more options for the 
private developers who could opt to deposit funds in a Public Art Trust. The Trust would 
be used to commission new temporary and permanent work with a maximum of 15 
percent from any particular project to be contributed to a repair and conservation 
reserve. Ms. Manton reported that the Planning Department viewed this option as less 
money for the commission of artwork, but stated that the Planning Department's 
biggest objection was the 20 percent administrative fee that would go to Arts 



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Commission staff for managing the projects; Ms. Manton noted that the 20 percent 
figure is consistent with the current administrative fee allowed by the Art Enrichment 
ordinance for managing public art projects. She stated that the Planning Department 
thought the fee was too high and that it would take money away from artists. Ms. 
Manton stated that the thresholds for the administrative fee could be lowered 
depending on the total budget of the project. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata thought 
that a flat fee was okay, but there should be some flexibility in case a project lasts 
much longer than anticipated. Ms. Manton agreed that there could be two different fee 
structures depending on the total budget. 

L5. Transbay Terminal Public Art Program 

Ms. Manton stated that she will report on the progress of the Transbay Terminal Public 
Art Program during the next Visual Arts Committee meeting. 

L6. Rabbinoid Relocation 

Ms. Manton reported that Gerald Heffernon's bronze Rabbinoid sculpture will be placed 
at an alternate location, on the campus of the Laguna Honda Hospital, which was 
approved by the Hospital Chief Administrator, with a plaque that states the sculpture 
is there on a long-term loan. Ms. Manton stated that this is an interim solution to the 
Arts Commission's concern with the safety of the sculpture. 

L7. California Street Steps Proposal 

Ms. Manton reported on a proposal by the Friends of Lincoln Park for the beautification 
of the California Street Steps, which has been in the works for three years. She 
presented images of the proposed tile design by artist Aileen Barr. Ms. Manton stated 
that while the Arts Commission supports this project, there is currently a moratorium 
on the acceptance of gifts because of limited staff resources. The Friends have 
proposed a $45,000 maintenance endowment and the Arts Commission is interested in 
sharing maintenance responsibilities and costs with the Recreation and Park 
Department. Ms. Manton explained that she met with Dennis Kern, Recreation and 
Park Department's Director of Operations, who stated that he was willing to take the 
proposal of shared responsibility to Recreation and Park Department's General 
Manager Yomi Agunbiade. Commissioner Johnston stated that Mr. Agunbiade's last 
day in the office was last Friday. He stated that another possible solution after the 
$45,000 is exhausted is to include the maintenance money in a future bond. 
Commissioner Johnston stated that he will follow up with Steve Kawa regarding the 
proposal and stated his enthusiastic support for the project based upon the success of 
the 16th Avenue stairway by the same artist. 

L8. New Business 

Ms. Manton reported that Patrick Dougherty's proposal for Civic Center Plaza is moving 
forward based on a recent conversation between Director of Cultural Affairs Luis R. 
Cancel and the Mayor's Office. 



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L9. Old Business 

There was no old business to report. 
The meeting was adjourned at 5:23 pm. 
MC 10/27/2008 



_ 



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10/28/2008 



Date: October 10, 2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Judy Moran 

Re: San Francisco Arts Commission Central Subway Public art Program Arts Master 
Plan 

DRAFT******DRAFT******DRAFT*****DRAFT 

Below is the final draft of the Goals and Guidelines sections of the Central 
Subway Arts Master Plan for review and approval by the Visual Arts 
Committee. 

San Francisco Arts Commission Central Subway Public Art Program 

Arts Master Plan 

The Central Subway Public Art Program Goals and Guidelines 
Central Subway Public Art Program Goals 



• 



• 



To commission vibrant high quality works of art to reflect San Francisco's 
enduring commitment to the exceptional design of civic spaces. 

To enhance the quality of transit riders' experience through a range of high 
quality, signature public artworks by both local and national artists. 

To create a unique visual identity for each station, architecturally and culturally, 
by commissioning artworks that dramatically enliven the station interiors and 
reflect the diverse history and vitality of surrounding neighborhoods. 

To develop artworks that will remain in excellent condition in a busy underground 
transit environment for many years through the use of durable materials and 
fabrication methods that allow for easy maintenance and are resistant to 
vandalism. 

To maintain ongoing neighborhood interest in the Central Subway Project and 
help to mitigate the impact of construction during the final design and 
construction phase through periodic temporary art and educational projects along 
the Central Subway corridor. 



• To engage new artists and maintain a fresh and lively environment in the Central 
Subway station following station completion through a rotating exhibition 
program at each station. 

Central Subway Public Art Program Guidelines 

The Arts Commission has developed the following guidelines for the Central Subway 
Public Art Program based on ideas expressed by the members of the Central Subway Arts 
Master Plan Advisory Group, community members in the Central Subway corridor 
neighborhoods, and the Arts Commission. 

These guidelines are based on the current plans and designs for the larger Central Subway 
Project. Changes in the Central Subway Project during the design development or 
construction phases may require adjustments in the artwork guidelines. For example, 
architectural or budgetary changes may affect the quantity, scale and locations, as well as 
the type of materials and fabrication methods, of the permanent artworks, and the scope 
and duration of the rotating exhibition program. Budgetary changes may also affect the 
number, frequency and size of the temporary community art projects and the extent of 
marketing and educational outreach, during the eight year design development and 
construction phases of the Central Subway Project. 

The Central Subway Public Art Program will include three components: 

1) Permanent public artworks 

a) In the subway stations and above ground areas adjacent to the station 

b) On the light rail platform at 4 and Brannan 

2) A rotating exhibitions program in each of the three subway stations after the transit 
line begins operation 

3) A temporary projects program in each of the neighborhoods in the vicinity of the 
subway stations during the design development and construction phases of the Central 
Subway. 

The guidelines are intentionally more general and conceptual than prescriptive in terms of 
artwork sites, proposed content, and materials in order to allow the Artist Finalists 
selected for each station adequate leeway in developing preliminary artwork proposals, 
and for the Artist Selection Panels to have flexibility in determining the best locations, 
thematic approaches, and aesthetic criteria for the artwork at each station. 

The Central Subway Public Art Program will include permanent artworks by a diverse 
group of local and regional, emerging and more established artists working in a variety of 
media. In addition, the rotating exhibitions program will provide future generations of 
artists with the opportunity to have their artwork professionally displayed in the stations 
after operations begin in 2016. 

Artworks with a vital and enduring aesthetic will be commissioned to forge a unique 
identity for each station. Some artwork may reflect a station's neighborhood context, 
either historically or culturally, while avoiding cultural stereotypes, and others may be 



based on broader, more universal themes. Other artworks may provide a format or 
aesthetic, particularly at the entryway, that is consistent from station to station, helping 
forge a broader visual identity for the system as a whole. 

The Arts Commission will work with the SFMTA to coordinate the allocation of station 
spaces for advertising and spaces for artwork. It is the Arts Commission's objective to 
have this accord finalized in a written agreement with the SFMTA before artists begin 
developing proposals for each station. 

With several different artworks in each station, as well as SFMTA directional signage 
and advertising, careful planning and coordination is essential at the outset of the project 
in order to incorporate several artworks in each station in a cohesive and thoughtful 
manner. Appropriate placement, scale, media, and content must be balanced within the 
larger architectural, operational and cultural context of each station. A chaotic collection 
of jarring and disparate artworks in a complex visual environment is to be avoided. 

It is expected that each station will have artwork in a variety of appropriate media. All 
permanent artworks will be fabricated in durable, easily maintained materials, such as 
ceramic or glass tile or mosaics; metal, including stainless steel porcelain enamel; 
laminated glass, terrazzo, and concrete. The Arts Commission will consult with a 
conservator as part of the review and evaluation process for each artwork proposal prior 
to final selection. 

Subway Station Artwork Categories 

Each station will feature both several permanent artworks and a temporary rotating 
exhibitions program in designated station areas. Some permanent artworks will contribute 
to a station identity, others will provide a connecting series of artworks that run through 
two or more levels of the stations, and some artworks may have a consistent format at 
each of the three stations, such as a distinctive light element. The rotating exhibitions 
program will provide an ongoing series of dynamic artwork displays that reflect the 
changing cultural and aesthetic interests of the City over time after transit operations 
begin. 

1. Permanent Public Artworks 

A collection of several permanent public artworks in the following four categories 
will be developed for each of the three stations and adjacent areas as follows: 

a. A large significant artwork 

One large scale, vibrant and engaging artwork in each station will create a 
station identity and a landmark for the neighborhood. A prime location for 
a significant artwork might be the station entryways, or the large wall 
expanses on the concourse levels. 

b. A wavfinding artwork project 

An art project by one or more artists will extend through two or three of 
the station levels, providing a thread for pedestrians to follow through the 
station to help with wayfinding. Not necessarily one long linear artwork, 



the project could be a series of artworks that are thematically and 
aesthetically related, creating a second signature element that helps to 
guide passengers through the station. Such projects might also incorporate 
historical or cultural elements related to the station neighborhood. This art 
project could involve multiple artists working with a consistent theme and 
format. However, these artworks are not intended to replace MTA 
directional signage, but to create a distinctive visual language that is 
coordinated with, rather than replacing, signage and other MTA graphic 
material. 

Examples might include a series of art elements extending along walls 
next to the escalators, or along the floor or ceilings in the entryway and 
concourse levels. An artwork might begin outside the station as banners or 
light fixtures and continue into the entryway and down through the station 
in other media. Artworks could be two dimensional, such as tile or metal 
insets, or sculptural, with elements sited throughout the station. The glass 
walls of the elevators that continue from the entryway to the platform level 
could contain a laminated or sand-blasted art treatment as long as visibility 
into the interior of the elevators cars was not significantly impaired. 

c. Additional artworks within the stations 

Additional art opportunities might include more intimate elements, each 
distinct and sited in a smaller area. Functional elements, such as benches, 
might be designed by artists on the platforms or concourse areas, as well 
as railings on the concourse level of the Chinatown station. Station pillars 
could be covered with mosaics, each by a different artist. 

d. Artworks adjacent to the stations 

Artworks will be located in appropriate areas adjacent to the station 
entryways to assist in leading pedestrians to the entry levels of the 
stations. As previously stated, these artworks could extend into the 
stations, leading passengers through the stations as well. Examples of 
artworks might be banners on the streets approaching the stations, a large 
archway that spans an intersection, or an above-ground sculptural element 
at the entryways. 

Such artworks cannot be on private property which will restrict projects to 
publicly owned real estate. The FTA states that "Artistic undertakings that 
promote specific private or corporate business interests are ineligible for 
FTA funding." 

Plans for artwork at the entryway of the stations can only be finalized after 
a final determination has been made about the buildings that will house the 
entryways to the subways at the Chinatown and Moscone/Yerba Buena 
stations. This determination will not necessarily coincide with the design 
development and construction schedule of the Central Subway. 



2. Rotating Exhibitions 

The Arts Commission will establish a rotating exhibitions program at each station 
to provide an ongoing infusion of fresh artwork for station users and allow for 
future generations of artists to participate in the Central Subway Public Art 
Program after the stations begin operations in 2016. Such a program will also 
provide an opportunity to Central Subway corridor arts organizations to have a 
presence in the stations by curating exhibitions. 

The Arts Commission will work with the MTA to designate a dedicated rotating 
exhibition space in each station and to provide the necessary professional 
exhibition equipment, such as light boxes, display cases, LED boards or decals. 
The display equipment may be different from one station to another, or each 
station may have a combination of different types of equipment, but the location 
and equipment will be determined and installed at each station prior to the end of 
project construction. 

The rotating exhibitions program will be funded by a reserve, a set amount of the 
art enrichment budget to be used exclusively for this purpose, possibly for a five 
year period following the beginning of system operations. The Arts Commission 
is committed to the rotating exhibitions program as long as funding is available. 
Exploration of additional funding sources to extend the rotating exhibition 
program will be investigated. 

The rotating exhibition program may not be used for other purposes such as 
advertising or public service, but will be reserved exclusively for temporary art 
projects. 

As the rotating exhibitions program will not be implemented until 20 1 6, the 
specific guidelines for the program will not be finally determined until closer to 
the end of construction. At this time, the Arts Commission is planning to 
determine exhibitions through an annual application process for San Francisco 
artists, nonprofit arts organization or nonprofit community organizations that have 
arts programming, such as a youth art program. A different artist or arts 
organization will be selected annually for each station, to work with the Arts 
Commission to curate one or more exhibitions. All exhibitions will need to be 
approved by the Arts Commission. 

The Arts Commission is working with the MTA to explore the possibility of 
dedicating a portion of the advertising delivery equipment for artwork. A 
challenge for such a program would be to create artworks that are distinctive 
enough not to be confused with the advertising. 

3. Temporary Art Projects 

The Arts Commission will conduct a temporary program of art activities 
throughout the eight year design development and construction phase of the 



Central Subway Project. This program will provide an additional investment in 
the Central Subway corridor neighborhoods, helping to mitigate the impact of the 
extensive multi-year City public works project. The program will allow for 
ongoing participation of artists, arts and other organizations, as well as the public, 
in the Central Subway Public Art Program. 

The program will initially sponsor approximately one temporary project per year, 
beginning in 2009, in one of the three Central Subway neighborhoods. Projects 
will be developed in the other two neighborhoods in the subsequent two years. 
Additional temporary projects may be scheduled annually depending on the 
availability of adequate resources. 

Projects will be selected through a competitive application process among artists, 
arts organizations or community organizations with an arts program along the 
Central Subway corridor. A two-tiered selection process will result in a short list 
of appropriate organizations selected and paid a stipend to develop proposals, one 
of which will be selected for implementation. 

Projects may include banners, bus wraps, posters, a cultural event, an art 
installation or a youth arts program, and may take place at any appropriate point 
along the Central Subway corridor, not just at the station locations. All temporary 
projects must reflect an aspect of the surrounding neighborhood and take place in 
a venue or venues that provide a maximum amount of broad public access. This 
program is not intended for a gallery or for exhibitions in existing nonprofit art 
spaces. 

3. Related Educational and Project Promotional Activities 

Throughout the design development and construction phases of the Central Subway 
Project, the Arts Commission will sponsor educational and promotional activities in the 
Central Subway neighborhoods. Such activities will include community presentations by 
those artists selected to create artwork for the Central Subway; public infonnational 
displays of artwork proposals; and brochures and posters about the Central Subway 
Public Art Program, among others. 



Date: October 10, 2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Susan Pontious 

Re: Civic Art Collection Inventory - Wall to Wall: Progress Report 



One of the primary mandated responsibilities of managing the city's art collection is 
preserving and caring for those objects. Accountability for objects is a significant part of 
that care. A major goal of the Civic Art Collection Program is to complete an inventory 
of the entire collection. This is a several year, multi-phase project. 

To date, no full inventory has ever been completed in the history of the Civic Art 
Collection, although several attempts have been made. Art collection inventories are 
ambitious projects, and require a staffing level that has been absent from the Arts 
Commission for many years. 

A full inventory of the San Francisco Civic Art Collection is particularly challenging due 
to the high number of "portable" works that have been loaned out to city departments 
since the early 1950's. Tracking artwork in a loan program such as this requires a 
diligence through adequate staffing and funding that the Arts Commission has struggled 
to provide. As a result, an inventory of these works requires an analysis of contradictory 
location records contained within our hard files as well as our electronic database, and 
sleuthing loans that are attached to city staff that are no longer employed with their 
respective departments or whose offices have relocated over the years. 

• There are approximately 3,200 objects in the Civic Art Collection. 

• 1,396 of these objects are catalogued in our database with unlisted locations. 

• An additional 754 objects are listed as on loan to 183 different city agencies and 
offices. 

Phase I - Completed FY07/08 

Location: San Francisco General Hospital 

STATS: 

• The San Francisco General Hospital inventory took 1 staff member approximately 
1 year to complete, dedicating 20% of their time to the project while working on 
concurrent assignments. 

• 169 objects were thought to be located at SFGH and 81 of these artworks have 
been accounted for as a result of the inventory. 

• 44 of the located works were removed from the hospital basement, and are stored 
at Brooks Hall. 

Locations: SFAC controlled storage spaces at Suite 60 (25 Van Ness Ave.) and Brooks 
Hall (Civic Center) 



Pagel 10/10/2008 



STATS: 



The Suite 60 and Brooks Hall inventories took 2 staff members approximately 6 

months to complete, dedicating 40% of their time to the project while working on 

concurrent assignments. 

487 objects were listed in EmbARK as being in Suite 60 prior to the 2008 

inventory 

624 clearly accessioned artworks have been accounted for in Suite 60; meaning 

137 previously missing works have been located. 

Brooks Hall provides storage for 128 artworks. 

80% of the artwork in storage needed identification photographs taken and 

entered into our database. 



PROCESS: 



• 



• 



Each storage space was approached systematically, beginning with arranging a 
numbering system for the existing storage furniture (the bins, racks, and drawers) 
as no formalized approach to the organization of the storage spaces had 
previously been arranged. 

Each artwork in the storage space was then given a condition assessment, checked 
that it was labeled properly, measured, photographed, its specific location 
recorded, re-packed in archival housing, and labeled on the exterior of the 
packaging. 

Inventory data was then reconciled with EmbARK - involving making location 
changes, adding images to records, entering condition notes, and correcting data 
mistakes left over from when the database was upgraded several years ago. 

Phase II - Scheduled completion end of FY09/10 

Locations: Department of Public Health including General Hospital, the Mental Health 
Rehab Facility, Health Clinics, and administrative offices. Inventory the Hall of Justice 
and the Branch Library's. 

Phase II goals for FY08/09 include the completion of the Health Department inventory, 
and giving priority to confirming the location of artworks in the collection of high merit. 
We will also begin the entry of loan data from existing paper files into EmbARK in order 
to establish loan chronologies from which to begin the tracking of objects. 



STATS: 



There are 161 objects listed as on loan to DPH buildings, programs, and offices, 
including SFGH and 19 satellite health centers. 

There are 83 objects listed as on loan to the Hall of Justice (850 Bryant), and 47 
objects on loan to police stations, Police Academy and Sheriffs facility. 
There are 19 objects listed as on loan to SFPL throughout 8 branches. 



COMMENT: 



Page 2 10/10/2008 



Phase II presents unique challenges and requires more detailed coordination than Phase I. 
We are inventorying spaces that we do not have control over or continued access too, 
therefore cannot freeze potential movement of objects, as would be done in other 
inventory initiatives. Scant location records will require Collections staff to conduct 
thorough walk-throughs of each office (including internal offices, closets, etc.). This is a 
delicate operation and requires making contact with a staff person within the department 
and scheduling time to enter the space. Several of the departments, including the Hall of 
Justice and the Mental Health Facility, require security escort. In addition, a number of 
our records lack photographic documentation, necessitating careful comparison to catalog 
information during the on-site inventory process. Fortunately, many pieces bear an 
identifying SFAC label on their reverse, but mounting hardware and size often requires 
assistance in removing them from the wall for inspection. 

Phase III 

Locations: City Hall, Public Art Projects, Monuments, and various remaining locations. 



Page 3 10/10/2008 



DATE: 
TO: 
FROM: 
RE: 



October 10, 2008 

Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 
Tonia Macneil 
NEW PROJECTS 



Project: Leland Avenue (Liveable Cities Great Streets Project) 

Location: Leland Avenue at Bayshore Boulevard, Visitation Valley 

Budget: Art Enrichment Allocation: $56,000 Artist's Budget: $38,000 

Artist: To Be Determined 

Leland Avenue 

Leland Avenue is a four-block commercial street that is the civic heart of Visitation Valley, a 
neighborhood of small bungalows in the Southeastern part of the City. The once-ignored 
neighborhood is now on the map largely due to the work of community members over the last 
twelve years, who have created a true civic treasure in the Visitation Valley Greenway, which 
begins at Leland Avenue Construction will start soon on a new library, the new T-Third Line is 
now running and a 20- acre parcel directly across from the intersection of Leland Avenue and 
Bayshore is scheduled for redevelopment with housing, businesses, and a link to the nearby Cal- 
Train Station. In sum, Leland Avenue is in the midst of a major renaissance. 

Creating a sense of arrival at the intersection of Leland Avenue and Bayshore is the primary 
goal of the Community and the Department of Public Works (DPW). A secondary choice is on 
the avenue itself adjacent to the entrance to the Greenway. 

Public Art Program 

As of this writing, we propose that the artwork be located on the Southwest corner of Leland and 
Bayshore Boulevard. In addition to being a free-standing sculpture, the artwork would serve 
both as an entrance beacon and, possibly, as a light fixture at night. The T-Third line stops in the 
center divider of Bayshore and a Muni bus stops at Leland. Drivers traveling the southbound 
lanes of Bayshore are naturally drawn to look at that corner. DPW has committed to providing 
the concrete base from which the artwork would rise, which will greatly enhance the possibilities 
available to an artist. Discussions are currently underway with Muni and with DPW to be sure 
that the site is available and relatively clear of visual clutter. In the event that we are unable to 
reach agreement, the second choice will be presented. 

Requested Action: Motion to approve a public art program (to be determined at the meeting) 
for the Leland Avenue Improvement Project. 



DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT 

September 29, 2008 

Draft Guidelines for the Placement of Commemorative Busts in City Hall 

General 

1. In accordance with City Charter Section 5.103, all gifts of artwork are subject to 
the review and approval of the Arts Commission and shall be consistent with the 
Arts Commission's Gift Policy Guidelines. ( to be attached) 

2. The Arts Commission does not accept gifts of artwork with specified conditions. 

3. The only gifts of artwork that will be considered for placement in City Hall are 
commemorative busts. 

4. The subject of the commemorative bust must have been either an elected official 
and served in office as the Mayor or a member of the Board of Supervisors or an 
individual whose contributions to the history of the City are well documented and 
established. 

5. The Arts Commission reserves the right to relocate or remove any bust or 
commemorative artwork at any time. The final decision regarding the placement 
of a commemorative bust will rest with the Arts Commission. 

6. All new installations, relocations and removal of busts are subject to the approval 
of the Arts Commission. 

7. Any gifts of a commemorative bust to the Arts Commission must be accompanied 
by a maintenance endowment the amount of which shall be determined by the 
Arts Commission as a condition of its acceptance. 

8. The Arts Commission shall consult with the Mayor's Office before finalizing any 
decision regarding the installation, relocation and/or removal of any 
commemorative busts. 

9. Where possible, if an existing bust is to be relocated, the Arts Commission shall 
make its best effort to consult with or advise individuals and/or communities that 
may be associated with the subject of the bust to be relocated. 

10. An informational presentation of the proposed design and location for the 
commemorative bust will be made to the City Hall Preservation Advisory 
Commission. 

Design 

1 . All commemorative busts must be of an appropriate scale and quality as 
determined by the Arts Commission. 

2. All proposed gifts of commemorative busts must be executed by artists of 
professional stature and expertise whose qualifications and past experience shall 
be reviewed by the Arts Commission. 

3. All commemorative busts shall consist of a stone pedestal and a bronze bust. 

4. The scale of all commemorative busts shall be at least life sized to include the 
head and shoulders of the person. The approximate size of pedestal and bust shall 
be 75 inches. The proposed site for the commemorative bust should be 
determined prior to its final design and fabrication. 



DRAFT DRAFT — DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT 

5. The pedestal must be clad with stone on all sides. A plywood or felt backing is 
not acceptable. 

6. Signage should be incorporated into pedestal base and may not be applied to the 
adjacent wall surface. 

7. The artists must be credited on either the pedestal or the bronze bust. 

8. Installations must be designed to be stable and secure without being bolted to the 
floor of City Hall. 

9. The total weight of the proposed commemorative bust and pedestal must be 
reviewed and approved by the City Hall Building Engineer prior to fabrication. 

Considerations for Site Selection 

1. The Mayor's Rotunda shall be reserved for busts of individuals who have served 
as Mayor of the City and county of San Francisco. 

2. The Board of Supervisor's Ceremonial Rotunda shall be reserved for busts of 
individuals who served as a member of the Board of Supervisors of the City and 
County of San Francisco. 

Future sites for commemorative busts shall be evaluated by the following criteria: 

1. Public Access 

2. Visibility of artwork 

3. Quality of natural and existing light 

4. Prominence of site within architectural hierarchy of building 

5. Architectural symmetry and balance 

6. Use of the site for programs and special events 

7. Ability to ensure the safety and protection of the artwork 

8. Historical context 

9. Office served by individual being commemorated 

Fees 

1. A Maintenance Endowment shall be required for each new commemorative 
bust to provide funds for routine cleaning and conservation of the work. 

2. The Arts Commission will be compensated for reasonable administrative 
expenses incurred in facilitating the review, acceptance and placement of the 
commemorative bust. 

Other Required Reviews and Approvals 

City Hall Facilities Management Office 
City Hall Preservation Advisory Commission 

Inventory of Potential Sites for Future Artworks : 



DRAFT - DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT 

1 st Floor: 

Top of central stairway from ground level. 

South west corner near Treasurer's Office 

2 nd Floor: 

Mayor's rotunda 

North Light Gallery Corridor 

Supervisors Ceremonial Rotunda 

3 rd Floor: 

North and South Light Gallery Corridors 

4 th Floor: 

North and South Light Gallery Corridors 



California Street Steps Improvement Project 

At the end California Street, near 32 nd Avenue, there is a wide cement staircase that leads up to 
Lincoln Park. This unique spot boasts a beautiful sweeping view of San Francisco, California 
Street stretching to downtown and on a clear day you can see the East Bay hills and Mt. Diablo. 
The California Street steps have a historic look, and were likely built in the early 1900's along 
with the Lincoln Park Golf Course. The steps are used by local residents for exercise and by 
tourists as an access to Lincoln Park, the Legion of Honor Museum and the newly renovated 
Land's End walk. 

Unfortunately, years of neglect and deterioration have led to broken and cracked cement and the 
stairs are often blighted by litter and graffiti. The Friends of Lincoln Park conceived an idea for a 
beautification project that would enhance the beauty of this unique location and restore the 
damage done by deterioration and neglect. An artistic tile project is proposed, its design would 
honor the era and style of the staircase and its functionality would serve to improve the area and 
inspire community and civic pride. 

The Friends of Lincoln Park will continue to work alongside neighborhood groups such as the 
Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association and others in hopes of achieving a positive improvement 
of the area. For more than a year, a group of interested neighbors have been gardening and 
cleaning the California Street stairs on a monthly basis. For the 2008-2009 school year, the girls 
in the upper school at Katherine Delmar Burke School will continue the cleaning and landscaping 
as part of a Community Service elective. 

The tile artist, Aileen Barr has much experience in public tile projects and you can see her work 
at the beautifully redone Alta Plaza Playground and the "San Francisco Beautiful" award-winning 
16th Avenue Stairs. 

We sincerely hope you will join us in this worthwhile effort to reclaim one of San Francisco's 
neighborhood treasures. Please contact us with any questions. 

Anna Yatroussis and Meg Autry 
Friends of Lincoln Park 
friendsoflincolnpark@yahoo.com 



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Proposed California Street Steps 






Top Retaining Wall, Pillar and Bench 



This proposed legislative change addresses several of Mayor Newsom's Policy Pillars and is the result of a 
collaborative effort among the Mayor's Office, Arts Commission, Planning Department and City Attorney's 
Office. The new legislation will enable the following four Policy Pillars to be achieved. 

1. Consolidate management of private Percent for Art requirements at the Arts Commission 

2. Increase temporary and performance based art in the public realm. 

3. Support art in the parks. 

4. Create new cultural destinations through art conscious city planning. 

Summary: The amendment to Section 149 of the Planning Code will allow for the aesthetic oversight of the 
Arts Commission to guide the selection of artwork by private developers for their properties in the Downtown. 
This review will ensure that high quality artwork is commissioned and placed in locations that are easily 
accessible to the public. In addition, the Arts Commission will maintain a publicly accessible online database of 
the privately funded public art in the Downtown. Currently, there is no inventory, record nor information 
regarding the artwork commissioned through this program since its implementation in 1985. Another significant 
feature of the proposed legislative change is the expansion of options available to the private developer to 
fulfill the 1% for art obligation. One of the new options reflected in the legislation allows developers to deposit 
the 1% art fee into a Public Art Trust. The Public Art Trust will be created by new companion legislation and 
will be overseen by the Arts Commission to fund the creation, installation and exhibition, conservation and 
repair of temporary and permanent works of art for public places within the downtown. An explanation of the 
options, the rationale for the change and the corresponding benefits are summarized below. 

1 . Private developers may spend 100% of the public art fee at the site of the development project and must 
consult with the Arts Commission regarding the type of artwork, its durability, design, artistic merit and publicly 
accessible location. The Arts Commission will also require interpretive signage to be placed in a location 
adjacent to the artwork. The Arts Commission will be paid on a time and materials basis for this consultation 
by the private developer out of the Public Art Fee. The Arts Commission will also maintain a public record of 
the location of privately owned artworks for which they have conducted reviews. This information shall be 
available to the public on line and shall be posted on the Arts Commission's website. 

Rationale: This ensures that art decisions will be made by qualified professionals, that the work will be in a 
publicly accessible location and that a record of the artwork and an online database to provide information to 
the public will be established and maintained. 

2. Private developers may contribute the entire 100% to a Public Art Trust which shall be established by new 
legislation which will be proposed as a companion to this legislative change. The Public Art Trust will be 
overseen by the Arts Commission and may be used to commission new permanent and temporary work for 
the C-3 District and for the repair and conservation of artwork in the C-3 District. A maximum of 15% from any 
particular project may be contributed to the repair/conservation reserve. 

Rationale: Many developers are unable to fulfill the original intent of Section 149 to place artwork in a publicly 
accessible location in conjunction with the new development. Since 9/1 1/2001, lobbies in many office and 
residential buildings are no longer considered public places due to security concerns. In addition, due to the 
economy and changes in planning requirements and real estate development trends, many developments no 
longer include large public plazas where artwork may be installed and developers instead choose to maximize 
their investment by building to the property line. If developers are not able to integrate the artwork into the 
facade of their building, few options remain to fulfill the art requirement. The benefit of the Public Art Trust is 
that it will allow the City to accumulate a larger single pot of funding dedicated for public art in the downtown 
than the funding available through the mechanism of the Art Enrichment Ordinance which can not be pooled 
due to bond restrictions. As the scale of private development in the downtown is often significantly greater than 
the art enrichment proceeds from community based projects, it is anticipated that the Trust have the potential 
to support significant urban scaled projects similar to Millennium Park in Chicago. 

3. Lastly, in an effort to comply with the original intent of Section 149 to place artwork at the site of the new 
development and to allow the Public Art Trust to grow, the final option provides a cost savings to developers 
as an incentive to place artwork at the site of the new development and to contribute to the Public Art trust. 
Private developers may spend 50% of the public art fee at the site of the development project, subject to the 
review and written comment from the Arts Commission and may contribute 45% of the balance of the public 
art fee to the Public Art Trust. 



Draft For Discussion Purposes Onh 
Privileged and Confidential - Attorney/Client Communicatioi 

Attorney Work Produc 

FILE NO. ORDINANCE NO. 

1 [Allocation and Administration of the Public Art Fee for Private Development Projects and 

establishment of Public Artwork Trust Fund.] 
2 

3 Ordinance amending Section 149 of the Planning Code to provide that developers 

4 currently required to spend one percent (1%) of construction costs for public artwork 

5 on any development project over 25,000 square feet located in a C-3 district (the 

6 "Public Art Fee") have an option to use all or a portion of the Public Art Fee to 

7 contribute to a City fund dedicated to support public art (the "Public Artwork Trust 

8 Fund") subject to Arts Commission approval; amending the Administrative Code by 

9 adding Section 10.200-29 to establish a Public Artwork Trust Fund, funded through 

10 contributions and Public Art Fees, for the creation, installation, exhibition, 

1 1 conservation and repair of temporary and permanent public art to be administered and 

12 expended by the Arts Commission; and making findings including findings under the 

13 California Environmental Quality Act. 

14 Note: Additions are single -underline italics Times New Roman ; 

deletions are strikethrough italics Times New Roman . 

1 5 Board amendment additions are double underlined . 

Board amendment deletions are strikothrough norma l. 

17 Be it ordained by the People of the City and County of San Francisco: 

18 Section 1. Findings 

1 9 (a) Pursuant to Planning Code Section 302, the Board of Supervisors finds that this 

20 ordinance will serve the public necessity, convenience, and welfare for the reasons set forth ir 

21 Planning Commission Resolution No. , and incorporates such reason; 

22 herein by reference. A copy of said Planning Commission Resolution is on file with the Clerk 

23 of the Board of Supervisors in File No. . 



24 (b) The Board of Supervisors finds that this ordinance is in conformity with the 

25 General Plan and the Priority Policies of Planning Code Section 101.1 for the reasons set 






* Mayor Newsom" 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS Page 1 

9/23/2008 
c:\docume-1\jmanton\locals-1\temp\notes6030c8\artord22.doc 



Draft 



., and hereby 



1 forth in Planning Commission Resolution No. 

2 incorporates those reasons by reference. 

3 (c) The Planning Department has determined that the actions contemplated in this 

4 ordinance are in compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (California Public 

5 Resources Code sections 21000 et seq.). Said determination is on file with the Clerk of the 

6 Board of Supervisors in File No. and is incorporated herein by 

7 reference. 

8 Section 2. The San Francisco Planning Code is hereby amended by amending Section 

9 1 49 to read as follows: 

10 SEC. 149. ARTWORKS, OPTIONS FOR USE OF PUBLIC ART FEE, RECOGNITION OF 

1 1 ARCHITECT AND ARTISTS AND MODEL ARTWORK REQUIREMENTS IN C-3 DISTRICTS. 

1 2 (a) ArtworkSr ; Options for use of Public Art Fee; Recognition of Artists . 

13 (I) Application. This section shall apply to all projects that involve In the case of 

1 4 construction of a new building or addition of floor area in excess of 25,000 square feet to an 

1 5 existing building in a C-3 Districts 

16 (2) Public Art Fee Requirement. Upon design approval from the Planning Department, and 

17 except as otherwise provided herein, the project sponsor shall dedicate and expend works of art costing 

18 an amount equal to one percent of the construction cost of the building or addition as 

1 9 determined by the Director of the Department of Building Inspection (the "Public Art Fee") for the 

20 purposes described herein and subject to the allocation options set forth below, shall be installed and 

21 maintained (i) in areas on the site of the building or addition and clearly visible from the public 

22 sidewalk or the open space feature required by Section 138, or (ii) on the site of the open space feature 

23 provided pursuant to Section 138, or (Hi) upon the approwil of any relevant public agency, on adjacent 

24 public property, or (iv) in a publicly accessible lobby area of a hotel. 
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1 (3) Project Sponsor's Public Art Fee Allocation Options. 

2 Tlie project sponsor shall select one of the following Public Art Fee Allocation Options in 

3 satisfaction of the Project sponsor's Public Art Fee Requirement, as further described below: 

4 (A ) Option to Use 1 00% of Public Art Fee to Provide On-Site Public Artwork 

5 Unless otherwise provided below, the project sponsor may elect to provide on-site public art of a value 

6 at least equivalent to the Public Art Fee. Tlie project sponsor must install such public art (i) in areas 

7 on the site of the building or addition so that the public art is clearly visible from the public sidewalk oi 

8 the open-space feature required by Section 138, or (ii) on the site of the open-space feature provided 

9 pursuant to Section 138, or (Hi) in a publicly accessible lobby area of a hotel ("On-Site Public 

10 Artwork"). Effective January 1, 2009, if the project sponsor elects the On-Site Public Artwork option. 

1 1 the project sponsor shall consult with the Arts Commission regarding the type, durability, design, 

12 artistic merit, and publicly accessible location of the project sponsor's proposed On-Site Public 

13 Artwork Following such consultation and prior to the Department of Building Inspection's issuance oi 

14 a Site Permit, the Arts Commission shall provide the project sponsor and Department with a written 

15 report summarizing its recommendations regarding the type, durability, design, artistic merit, and 

16 publicly accessible location of the On-Site Public Artwork. Tlie Arts Commission shall conduct its 

17 consultation with the project sponsor regarding the On-Site Public Artwork proposal within 60 days of 

18 receiving complete documentation of the On-Site Public Artwork proposal from the project sponsor, 

19 unless the Zoning Administrator approves a time extension following a written request by the Arts 

20 Commission setting forth the reasons for the requested extension. Tlie Controller shall deduct from the 

21 fee proceeds an amount that recovers the costs incurred bx the Arts Commission and its staff for 



22 consultation regarding the On-Site Public Artwork. Once the project sponsor has installed and 

23 completed the final Artwork, the project sponsor, building owner and any third party, may not remove, 



24 
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1 relocate or alter the Artwork without notifying and consulting with the Arts Commission at least 120 

2 days prior to the proposed removal, relocation or alteration. 

3 (B) Option to Contribute 100% of Public Art Fee Amount to Public Artwork Trust. Effective 

4 January 1, 2009 for a project that has not received its first Site Permit, and except as provided herein. 

5 the project sponsor may elect to deliver the Public Art Fee directly to the City Treasurer for deposit in 

6 the Public Art Trust Fund defined under Section 10. 100-29 of the San Francisco Administrative Code 

7 for the creation, installation, exhibition, conservation and repair of works of public art ( "In-Lieu Fee 

8 for Public Artwork Trust"); or 

9 (C) Option to Provide 50% of Public Art Fee Amount to On-Site Public Artwork with 

10 Remaining Discounted Amount to Public Art Trust. Effective January 1, 2009 a project that lias not 

1 1 received its first Site Permit may elect to expend 50% of the Public Art Fee for the acquisition of'On- 

12 Site Public Artwork that shall be subject to the requirements of subsection (3)(A) above regarding On 

13 Site Public Artwork, and deposit 45% of the remaining balance of the Public Art Fee into the Public 

14 Art Trust. These two actions will fulfill the project sponsor's Public Art Fee Requirement under this 

15 Section 149 and die project sponsor may retain the balance of 5% of the Public Art Fee for other 

16 project purposes. 

17 (D) Option to Pay an In-Lieu Fee for Renovation of Certain Historical Landmarks. 

18 Notwithstanding any other provision of this Ordinance, if the project sponsor pays tlie Public Art Fee 

1 9 prior to June 6, 2009 which is the date upon wliich Ordinance No. 77-04 shall expire, tin lieu of 

20 installing and maintaining On Site- Public Artworks as defined above in subsection 3(A) and in lieu of 

21 paying anv portion of the Public Art Fee to die Public Artworks Trust under subsection 3(B) or 3(C) 

22 above^ works of art pursuant to subsections (i) through (iv) above, a project Sponsor may elect to 

23 contribute a sum of money at least equivalent to the cost of the artwork the Public Art Fee to 

24 finance, in whole or in part, rehabilitation and restoration of the exterior of a publicly-owned 



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1 building provided that the building is (i) owned by the City and County of San Francisco, and 

2 (ii) located in a P District adjacent to a C-3 District, and (iii) designated as an historical 

3 landmark by Article 10 of this Code or designated as a Category I Significant Building by 

4 Article 1 1 of this Code and listed as a National Historical Landmark on the National Historical 

5 Register ; provided, however, that the right to elect to use this in lieu provision to satisfy the 

6 obligations of this Section shall terminate five years from the effective date of this ordinance . 

7 (4 ) Notification, Approvals; Installation, Medium and Display of Artwork. 

8 Prior to the issuance of a Site Permit from the Department of Building Inspection, the project 

9 sponsor must notify the Arts Commission in writing as to which of the above-listed allocation options 

10 set forth under subsection 3(A) through 3(D) it chooses. Tlie project sponsor must schedule a 

1 1 consultation with the Arts Commission as provided in subsection 3(A) above, unless the project sponso 

12 elects to contribute 100% of the Public Art Fee to the Public Artwork Trust as described under 

13 subsection 3(B) above. If the project sponsor chooses to install and maintain an On-Site Public 

1 4 Artwork, sS aid works of art shall be installed prior to issuance of the first certificate of 

1 5 occupancy; provided, however, that if the Zoning Administrator concludes that it is not feasibk 

1 6 to install the works within that time and that adequate assurance is provided that the works 

17 will be installed in a timely manner, the Zoning Administrator may extend the time for 

18 installation for a period of not less than 12 months. Said works of art may include sculpture, 

1 9 bas-relief, murals, mosaics, decorative water features, tapestries or other artworks 

20 permanently affixed to the building or its grounds, or a combination thereof, but may not 

21 include architectural features of the building, except as permitted with respect to the in lieu 

22 contribution regarding publicly owned buildings meeting the criteria described above. Artworks 

23 shall be displayed in a manner that will enhance their enjoyment by the general public. The 

24 type and location of artwork, but not the artistic merits of the specific artwork proposed, shall 



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1 be approved by the Zoning Administrator following ci review of the Arts Commission's written report 

2 under Section (a)(3)(A) in a ccordance with the provisions of Section 309. 

3 (5) Construction cost; Payment of Fees . 

4 The term "construction cost" shall be determined by the Planning Department in 

5 accordance with established industry standards or in the manner used to determine the valuation 

6 of work as set forth in Section 1 07.2 of the Building Code. Except where the project sponsor has 

7 elected to provide On-Site Public Artwork, the Project Sponsor must provide written evidence to the 

8 Planning Department and the Arts Commission that the Public Art Fee has been paid in full and 

9 deposited with the City Treasurer prior to the Department of Building Inspection's issuance of a first 

10 Site Permit. 

1 1 i£i Recognition of Architects and Artists. In the case of construction of a new building 

12 or an addition of floor area in excess of 25,000 square feet to an existing building in a C-3 

1 3 District, a plaque or cornerstone identifying the project architect and the creator of the On-Site 

1 4 Public Artwork artwork provided pursuant to Subsoction (a) this Section 149 and the erection 

1 5 date of the On-Site Public Artwork shall be placed at a publicly conspicuous location on the 

16 building prior to the issuance of the first certificate of occupancy. Prior to the issuance of the 

17 first certificate of occupancy, the project sponsor shall also send a written notice to the Arts 

18 Commission for the Commission's records containing the name of the artist(s), the title, date and 

19 medium of the artwork, a photograph of the artwork, and the location of the Artwork and address of the 

20 building. 

21 -f*^ Models. In a C 3 District, in the case of construction of a new building, or any addition in height in 

22 excess of 10 feet to an existing building, two models shall be submitted to the Department of City 

23 Planning prior to approval of the project, as follows: 

24 (-H — One model of the building at a scale of I " » 100'; and 



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1 {i) — One model of the block in which the building is located at a scale of 1 " ■ 32', which model shall 

2 include all the buildings on the block on which the building is located and the streets surrounding the 

3 block to the centerline of the streets and shall use as its base the land form starting at sea level; 

4 provided, however, that if the Department of City Planning determines that it has an up to date model 

5 of the block in which the building is located, only a model of the building shall be submitted. 

6 -kto (c) Procedure Regarding Certificate of Occupancy. The Director of the Department 

7 of Building Inspection shall provide notice in writing to the Zoning Administrator at least five 

8 business days prior to issuing the first certificate of occupancy for any building subject to the 

9 provisions of this Section. If the Zoning Administrator notifies the Director within such time tha 

10 the provisions of this Section have not been complied with, the Director shall deny the permit. 

1 1 If the Zoning Administrator notifies the Director that the provisions of this Section have been 

12 complied with or fails to respond within five business days, the permit of occupancy shall not 

13 be disapproved pursuant to this Section. As used herein, the "first certificate of occupancy" 

1 4 shall mean either a temporary certificate of occupancy or a Certificate of Final Completion an< 

15 Occupancy as defined in San Francisco Building Code Sections 109.3 and 109.4, whichever 

1 6 is issued first. The procedure set forth in this subsection is not intended to preclude 

1 7 enforcement of the requirements of this Section through any means otherwise authorized. 

18 id) Public Artwork Trust. 

19 (1 ) All monies contributed to the Public Artwork Trust pursuant to this Section 149 shall be 

20 deposited in the special fund maintained bx the Controller called the Public Artwork Trust under 

21 Section 10. 100-29 of the Administrative Code, as may be amended. The receipts in the Trust are 

22 hereby appropriated in accordance with law to be used by the Arts Commission within the C-3 District 

23 or within a half-mile of the boundary of the C-3 District to enhance the visibility and quality of 

24 artworks and to improve the public 's access and enjoyment of the artworks. With this objective, the 



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1 Public Art Trust shall be used to: (i) fund the creation, installation, exhibition, conservation and repair 

2 of temporary and permanent public works of art within the C-3 District or within a half mile of the 

3 boundary of the C-3 District and (ii) fund the conservation and repair of temporary and permanent 

4 artworks within the C-3 District or within a half-mile of the boundary of the C-3 District subject to a 

5 15% maximum allocation per single project and (Hi) pax the reasonable administrative expenses of the 

6 Arts Commission staff in connection with administering compliance with the requirements of this 

7 Section on a time and materials basis. The Arts Commission shall administer and expend the Public 

8 Artwork Trust, which shall have the authority to prescribe rules and regulations governing the Fund 

9 that are consistent with this Section. Tlie Arts Commission shall prepare and submit an annual report 

10 of the expenditures and use of the Public Art Trust to the Director of the Planning Department starting 

1 1 in July 1 of 2009 for the prior fiscal year. Tlie Arts Commission shall not allocate more than 15% of 

12 the amount of any Public Art Fee deposited into the trust for conservation and repair of artworks which 

13 are located in the C-3 District or within a half-mile of the boundary of the C-3 District. 

14 (e) Lien Proceedings. 

15 (1) A project applicant's failure to comply with the requirements of this Section shall 

16 constitute cause for the City to record a lien against the development project in the sum of the in-lieu 

17 fee required under this Ordinance. 

18 (2) If, for any reason, the requirements in this Section are not met or the fee imposed 

19 pursuant to this Ordinance remains unpaid following issuance of a certificate of occupancy for the 

20 project, the Treasurer shall initiate proceedings to impose the lien in accordance with the procedures 

21 set forth in Chapter 10, Article XX, Sections 10.230 et seq. of the San Francisco Administrative Code to 

22 make the entire unpaid balance of the fee, including interest, a lien against all parcels used for the 

23 development project. Tlie Treasurer shall send all notices required by that Article to the owner of the 

24 property as well as the sponsor. Tlie Treasurer shall also prepare a preliminary report notifying the 
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I II 

III 



TILfOfcAPHHftl 
BWILLttS 



October 14, 2008 

San Francisco Arts Commission 
26 Van Ness Ave., Suite 240 
San Francisco, C A 94102 

Dear SFAC Visual Arts Committee Members, 

As a committee focused on enriching the quality of life in our community through 
support of local art and culture, it has come as a surprise to observe that SFAC is 
proposing to award 1. million dollars in contracts to four artists from out of state to do 
permanent art installations in the Terminal 2 remodeling project at our SF International 
Airport. 

We understand that SFAC has received no less than 530 applications for SFO T-2 
through the CAFE process that the Art Commission has established. In light of this we 
find it hard to believe that the selection panel failed to find even one San Francisco Artist 
technically and artistically qualified for this project. 

Our concern in this matter reflects our strongly held belief that artists for this kind of 
project should almost exclusively come from the rich and diversified cultures within our 
own city, in which many talented artists produce wonderful art work which reflect 
communities that they originate from. Shouldn't the Art Commission of the City of San 
Francisco select our own artists for installation contracts at our own airport? When this 
happens and if the right kind of publicity is associated with this work at the airport 
within the terminals, visitors will then be introduced to and hopefully patronize more of 
local art and visit galleries and working art studios within our city. In this sense our 
airport becomes a real "gateway" for visitors to access the many culturally rich 
communities that make up our great city. 

Further, the significant grant that is associated with this kind of project should be used to 
enable artists within our city to develop their studios and -work so as to establish our city 
as a world-class center for working artists who create their work within it and actually 
earn a living doing so. 

Currently, several other projects are offered in SFAC CAFE process, with hundreds of 
thousands of dollars in contractual awards available for artists. These are the SF General 
Hospital, the proposed Central Subway Project and four new Libraries from Visitation 



Valley to our neighborhood in the North Beach Chinatown Area. Unfortunately, the 
SFAC CAFE process for these projects does not favor artists actually living and working 
in these communities within San Francisco either. This is also unacceptable in our 
opinion, particularly in the context of the recently enacted "Green Cities" policy our city 
is supposed to be following in awarding city contracts to vendors, merchants and 
contractors who Jive and work within our city. 

In the spirit of supporting our local San Francisco artists we ask that the Visual Arts 
Committee of the SF Art Commission reject or amend the current recommendations 
forwarded from the selection panel for the SFO T-2 project and withhold approval until a 
way is found to include San Francisco artists for this and future projects. 

Lastly, as a community based organization, we offer to work directly with the SFAC to 
form an internal policy that ensures more San Francisco artists receive contracts on up 
coming projects within our city as our current city policy directs. We hope that the 
SFAC will include other community-based organizations such as ours in this effort in 
order to form a diverse selection panel with knowledge and access to the wealth of 
artistic resources in the City of San Francisco. 



Thank You, 



\(yv 




Termeh YeghiazarUn, Chair 
Art & Culture Committee 



sfac: November 19, 2008 Page 1 of 5 



San Francisco Arts Commission 

LISTEN 
TEXT ON LY 
PRINT 

A 
A 
A 

November 19, 2008 n-,7 osm, 32 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, November 19, 2008 DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

3:00 p.m. 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 fcinu ] j onng 

Agenda SAN FRANCISCO 

1. Consent Calendar PUBLIC LIBRARY 

1. Motion to approve a mural by artist Mona Caron covering two walls of a building at 
86-98 Golden Gate Avenue at Jones Street in collaboration with youth from the Boys & 
Girls Clubs of San Francisco and the Community Arts Studio. The mural will depict the 
history of the neighborhood as well as the Southeast Asian community that currently 
resides in the area. 

2. Motion to approve the following artists as recommended by the Central Subway 
Artist Pool Selection Panel as additions to the Central Subway Artist Pool to be eligible 
candidates for Central Subway Public Art Program art opportunities: Seyed Alavi, Tomie 
Arai, Lawrence Argent, Alice Aycock, Ron Baron, JD Beltran and Scott Minneman, 
Jonathan Bonner, Bill and Mary Buchen, Kendall Buster, Ed Carpenter, Chusien Chang, 
Jackie Chang, Jackie Ferrara, Bill Fontana, Karen Ganz, Cliff Garten, Brian Goggin, 
Douglas Hall, Nancy Horn, Yumei Hou and Cai Hong Zhao, Joyce Hsu, Michio Ihara, 
Yunfei Ji, Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, Kenneth Lum, Wang Po Shu and Louise Bertelsen, 
Erwin Redl, Kent Roberts, John Roloff and Lewis deSoto, May Sun, Hank Thomas and 
Ryan Alexiev, Brian Tolle, Catherine Wagner, Flo Oy Wong, Rene Yung, and Faye 
Zhang. 

3. Motion to approve the following artists as recommended by the Branch Library 
Improvement Program Artist Pool Selection Panel as part of the pre-qualified pool for 
projects at four branch libraries in San Francisco: Susan Adame, Adeyinka Adeyemi, 
Seyed Alavi, Steven Allen, Susannah Bettag, Freddy Chandra, Mei-Chu Chang, Marion 
Coleman, Susan Felter, Sheila Ghidini, Todd Gilens, Mark Grieve, Gerald Heffernon, 
Joyce Hsu, Alexandre Koulouris, Dorothy Lenhenan, Cork Marcheschi, Anita Margrill, 
Fran Martin and Jim Crowden, Patricia Montgomery, Elsa Murray, Ene Osterraas- 
Constable and Scott Constable, Johanna Poethig, Samantha Renko, Jim Rosenau, 
Catherine Schmid-maybach, Kathryn Schnell, Les Seymour, Arthur Stern, Barbara 
Szerlip, Amy Trachtenberg, Ann Weber, Lena Wolff, and Debey Zito. 



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4. Motion to approve the inclusion of the following artists in a pre-qualified pool for 
projects at Terminal Two at San Francisco International Airport: Seyed Alavi, Terry 
Allen, Lawrence Argent, Dan Corson, Jim Hirshfield, Ray King, Sheila Klein, Michio 
Ihara, Anna Murch and Doug Hollis, George Peters and Melanie Walker, Jody Pinto, 
Charles Sowers, May Sun, Catherine Wagner, and Nikolas Weinstein. 

5. Motion to approve the six final designs for the Art on Market Street Project by Briana 
Miller and Thien Pham titled The Mighty Defender and the Unsung Hero, to be 
reproduced and installed in 24 kiosks on Market Street from December 22, 2008 to 
March 19, 2009. 

Gallery 

Meg Shiftier 

Presentation and discussion of excerpts from the original soundtrack by artist Bill 
Fontana of his work Spiraling Echoes: A Sound Sculpture for the Rotunda of San 
Francisco City Hall, which will be on view from February through mid-May, 2009. 

San Francisco International Airport - Terminal Two 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation of work by artist Janet Echelman, who will create an artwork for 
Terminal Two at San Francisco International Airport. Presentation of work by artist 
Charles Sowers, who will develop an artwork(s) for the "Kid's Spot" locations also in 
Terminal Two. 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into an agreement 
with Janet Echelman for an amount not to exceed $150,000 for Phase I, conceptual 
design through construction documents, for an artwork at Terminal Two of San 
Francisco International Airport. 

Motion: Motion to approve the selection of Charles Sowers to design an artwork(s) to 
be located in the "Kid's Spot" locations in Terminal Two of the San Francisco 
International Airport, and to authorize payment to Charles Sowers in the amount of 
$1,000 for a design proposal. 

San Francisco General Hospital 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation of artists chosen by the San Francisco General Hospital Selection Panel to 
create works for the San Francisco General Hospital new Acute Care Unit. 

Motion: Motion to approve the following list of artists and artist teams, who by virtue 



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sfac: November 19, 2008 Page 3 of 5 



of the San Francisco General Hospital Selection Panel score will be considered first for 
commission opportunities in the new Acute Care Unit: Rupert Garcia, Deborah 
Roundtree and Brian Crotty, Lena Wolf, Lorna Jordan, Lisa Levine, Paul Marioni and 
Ann Troutner; Joel Meyerowitz, Christian Moeller, Tom Ottemess, Susan 
Schwartzenberg, Beliz Brother, Stephen Galloway, Cliff Garten, Paul Kos, Mike Mandel, 
Anna Murch and Doug Hollis, Masayuki Nagase. 

Motion: Motion to approve the following artists as an additional pre-qualified pool for 
any additional opportunities identified at San Francisco General Hospital: Johanna 
Poethig, John Roloff, Nita Winter, Ed Carpenter, John Wehrle, Suikang Zhao, Lynn 
Basa, James Carpenter, Michio Ihara, Joe Thurston and Sean Healy, Amy Trachtenberg, 
Seyed Alavi, Rob Badger, Kathy Bradford, Dana Zed, Tony Berlant, Nancy Blum, Chris 
Green, Henry Domke, Abhi Ganju, Merle Serlin. 

Motion: Motion to approve Rupert Garcia, by virtue of having received the highest 
score by the panel, as the lead artist for the entry lobby, and authorization to pay him 
an honorarium of $5,000 to develop preliminary design concepts. 

5. Ingleside Branch Library 

Judy Moran 

Presentation of revised art design for the Ingleside Branch Library. 

Motion: Motion to approve the final design of a 30 foot long glazed metal wall relief 
artwork for the new Ingleside Branch Library by artist Eric Powell and to authorize the 
artist to proceed to fabrication. 

6. Civic Art Collection 

Allison Cummings 
Staff Report 

Report on the following Collection projects: the vandalism and repair of The Holocaust, 
1982 by George Segal and the removal and storage of Conquest of Space, 1983 by 
Rufino Tamayo from Terminal Two at San Francisco International Airport. 

7. Civic Center Plaza - Temporary Sculpture Proposal 

Jill Man ton 

Report on the installation of a temporary willow sapling sculpture by artist Patrick 
Dougherty in Civic Center Plaza. 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into agreement 
with Patrick Dougherty for the installation of a temporary willow sapling sculpture in 
Civic Center Plaza for a total amount not to exceed $60,000 for the design, 



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sfac: November 19, 2008 Page 4 of 5 



development, fabrication, transportation and installation of the artwork as well as 
identification plaques. 

8. Chinese Recreation Center 

Jill Man ton 

Presentation of a new public art enrichment opportunity at the Chinese Recreation 
Center on Mason and Washington Streets in Chinatown. 

9. Hayes Valley Playground 

Jill Manton 

Presentation of a new public art enrichment opportunity at the Hayes Valley Playground 
located at Hayes and Buchanan Streets. 

L0. New Business 

LI. Old Business 

L2. Adjournment 

MC 11/14/2008 
Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts 

Commission office, 25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during 

regular business hours. INFO: Mary Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration 

of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic 

devices are prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the 

removal from the meeting of any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell 

phone, pager, or other similar sound-producing electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or 

administrative action may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San 

Francisco Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to 

register and report lobbying activity. For more information about the Lobbyist 

Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San 

Francisco, CA 94102 - telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and 

ht tp: / /w ww.sfgov.org/ethics. 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. 

Commissions, boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to 

conduct the people's business. This ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted 



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sfac: November 19, 2008 Page 5 of 5 



before the people and that City operations are open to the people's review. For more 
information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report a violation of the 
ordinance, contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine 
Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 
94102-4689; by phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at 
sotf@sfg ov.or g . 



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Date: November 19, 2008 

To: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

From: Allison Cummings 

Re: Civic Art Collection Staff Report 

1 . Vandalism and repair of The Holocaust, 1 982 by George Segal 

The San Francisco Arts Commission was alerted Wednesday morning (November 12, 
2008) to the vandalism of The Holocaust, 1982 by George Segal. The artwork - 
consisting of 1 1 life-size figures cast in bronze, painted white, and arranged behind a 
barbed-wire fence - is a powerful memorial to the victims of the Holocaust located in the 
grove of trees across from the entrance of the Legion of Honor. This is the second time 
in as many months that the sculpture and it's accompanying marble plaques have been 
defaced by vandals. The Arts Commission is working closely with sculpture conservators 
to restore the artwork, however it is a costly (approximately $5,000 to $6,000) and time 
consuming project. We were able to significantly diminish the appearance of the most 
egregious damage to the artwork on-site Wednesday afternoon, however further 
intervention in still needed. The artwork was commissioned by the Mayor's Committee 
for a Memorial to the Six Million Victims of the Holocaust and was given as a gift to the 
City in 1984. 



2. Removal and storage of Conquest of Space, 1 983 by Ruf ino Tamayo from 
Terminal Two at San Francisco International Airport. 

On Wednesday November 5, 2008 Rufino Tamayo's sculpture Conquest of Space, 1983 
was successfully de-installed and craned out of Terminal 2 at San Francisco 
International Airport, to make way for the planned refurbishment of the terminal. The 
sculpture was rigged by Atthowe Fine Art Services, and lifted out of the courtyard that 
has been it's home since 1984. The artwork - a 45 foot tall steel sculpture consisting of 
triangular forms alternately painted red and blue - was transported by truck to the 
secured storage yard adjacent to the Airport Museums main office, where it will remain 
until we commence with restoration and re-installation at the International Terminal. 



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Meeting Information 



Archive Cenlci 

hat k 1" \rls Co 



> Visual_ArLs_Oniiinille« 



Visual_Afls„Committee 

X go | 



VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, November 19, zoo8 

3:00 p.m. 

2, r i Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 



Mil 



itei 



» Prvsenl: 

Jcuoenc Przyblyski, Alexander Lloyd. \'J. Join 
Absent: l-orrame Garcia-Niikala 



Stuff 1 Present; 

l uLs Cancel MaryChou, ADtson Cummings, Carol Marie Daniels. JQlManton.JudyMomi, Susan Ponliaus, Ellen Shersho 

N«lc: All voles are unnnimous unless recorded othcrwse. 
The meeting commenccdal 3:06 p.m. 



ntCalenda 

1, Mnlion In appro* 
tayjJkGufeCl 
1l1.1i current!) reside 



;il by artist Mona Caron t 



n covering two walk of a building at 86-98 Golden Gale Avenue at Jones Streol in collaboration with youth hom tin 
Boys Ik (Silk Clubs o| San Francisco and I the Community Arts Studio. The mural wfll depict the tiui<»n'rtfilit- t)i?i K lih..rli-i'Hl;is w,-!l..s ilir s..uiIk...si \--i.m oMniiiuiiit 
n the area. 



2. Motion to approve the following artists as recommended by the Central Subwaj Artist Pool Selection Panel as additions to the Central Subway aml^i pool la be 
eligible candidates for Central Subway Public Art Program art opportunities. SeycdAkvi, Tbmic Aral Lawicnee Argent Alice Ayeock, Ron llaron, JDBcllnni and Scnll 
Mmneman. Jonathan Bonner, Dill and Mary Buchco, Kendall Biuter. Ed Caqx-iiiL-r. il.ii... 1, . l.-.n^.-iaLii.-i l,. inK ..i. K kK l r cri:»r... iiill 1 ..ui:.!,.,. K.uvn r...../. i hi! 
Garfcn, Brian Goggm, Douglas Hall, Nancj Mom. YumciHou and Cai Hong Zhao, Joyce Hsu l M»diiolhara,YunfeiJLl|)'aandEniiliaKahnkov. Kenneth Urn. Wang 
Po Shu and Louise Boriebcn, Erwm Rodl Kent Roberts, John Roloffand Lcwfa deSoto, May Sim. I InnkThomas am! Ryan Alcxic\ , Brwn ToDe, Catherim '• 

<>> Wong, Rene Yung, and Fayc Zhang. 

3. Motion toapprovi the following artists as recoromendedby the Branch library Improvement Program Artisl Pool Selection Panel as part of the prc-qualificd pool 
rorprojecbalfour branch libraries in San Francisco: Susan Adume, Adeyinka ndcyemi, Seycd Alavi, Steven Allen, Susannah Bcltag, Freddy Chandra, Mci Cbu Chang 
Marion Coleman, Susan Fclter,SheilaGhkltai,ToddGikns.MarkGri^^ Dorolhj Unchan.CorkMarcheschi. 
Anita MargriV, Iran Martin andJimGrowden, Patricia Montgomery, EIsaMarray, Ene Ostcnias-Conslabk and Scott Constable, Johanna Poethig, Sanumlh 

Jim Rosenau, Catherine Schmhl-Maybach, Kalhryn Selmcll. U-.s Seymour. Arthur stem, Barbara Szerbp, Am) Trachtenberg, Ann Weber, Una Wolff, and Dcbey Zitn. 



i Motion hi approve the inclusion of the following artists in a pre^ualfficd pool for projects at Tc 
Allen. Lawrence Ardent, Dun Corson, Jim Hirshfield, Ra 3 King, Sheila Klein, Michiolhani, Anna] 
Pinto. Charles Sowers, May Sun, Catherine Wagner, and Nikolas Wcinslein. 



m mi] Tun. 1 1 San Francisco International Airport: Scycd Alavi. Ten) 
urcband Doug Hollb. George Peters and Melanie Walker, Jod) 



5. Motion in appl 
rvproduoL-d am) ii 



nv the six final designs for the Alton Market Street Project by BrianaMillerandThien Pham tilled ThcMightu Defender und the Unsung Ha 
stalled in ±4 kiosks mi Market Street from December 22, 2008 •*» Marvh 19,2000. 



Commissioner Przybryski requested pubficcomnienl regardhg theConsen 
whose grandfather was, and whose Either currently b, a working artisl in Si 
submitted appicalions for the Central Subway Artisl Pool, neither of them' 
in supporting artists who live and or work in San Francisco or il the organn 



ition had its. 



1 Emma Mankin introduced herself as a San Franciseo-bascd art student 
9. Mankin slated that while both she an J her lather, Daniel Macchiarini, 
the pool. She asked Commissioners il the Arts Commission was committed 
m agenda 



rPrxyblyski stated thai the Visual ArisCommittcc typkau) does not discuss public comments during the meeting, but lakes ihucnmincnLs under 
advisement. She then explained dial as a professor, she Ills niany students who are interested in creating public artworks. As brgcrcitycoinmiuionsarccnmplicalcd 
in terms of the level of competitiveness and tliL.- process of completing contracts, her advice to her students is ti> nam experience l>> creating local, temporary public 
artworks with organizations such as Southern Exposure. Project Manager Judy Moron stated that for the Central Subway Call for Artisls, extensive outreach "as 
conducted to artisls nnd art organizations lliroughoul Ihc Bay Area, which included two artisl workshops and a CaFE workshop in collaboralion with the Alameda 
Public Ait Program. 



!ommissioner.Jonivston staled that in 1 
Hbrt in pmviding oppiatunities loSnn 
neclings, which arc iwD-dncumcntcdi 



iganls i" tins topic he lias heanJ opinions ranging from limiting 
tancisco-bnscd artists. He staled thai Ihc Arts Commission slafl hi 
tlie minutes. 



i-s let onrj local artists, lo making no particular 
pressed its opinion about the topic in past Cammiss 



Motion: Motion to adopt (he consent calcndaritcms. 
Moved: Wusej Johnston 



Gallery 

Ms. Shifflerstalud that Mr Fonlana had to leave for another appointment and therefore could not present an exccrpl from liLs new sound work tilled Sniralmg Echoes: 
A Sound Scutplurefor the Rotunda of San Francisco i it 11 Hull. She staled lhai the project has approached a contractual miles lone and proposed thai Mr. Fonlana 
make a presentation at the December full Commission meeting, she reminded Commissioners to RSVP for a sound lest lhal Mr. Fonlana will conduct on December 20 
forstair in City I lall Ms. Shifflcrabo announced that the exhibition dale has Wen postponed to February 12, 2000 andshe will coordinate this new dak »iUi other 
people's schedules. 



Commissioner Johnston agreed to a sound presentation during the Deo 



1 .la 



k full Cm 



cling, depending on schedule. 



;j. Sun Francisco International Airport - Teriranal Two 

Public Art Program Deput) Director Susan Pontious explained that artist Janet Echehn 
San Francisco International Airport ("SFCT)- 



ould present her proposal via Skypc for a 



vartwnrk for Terminal Two at 



Ms. Echelman began by slating thai she was presenting a preliminary concept for her work al the Airport and thai she welcomes all input from the team as Ihc concept 
develops, she first presented the work SheChanges, completed in 2005 The piece b 150 feel in diameter, and was designed lo no) block views ol the ocean, and to 
withstand hurricane winds, pollution and sea salt. She then presented her project called the Richmond Oval, a Vancouver 2010 WinlcrGamcs ienuc, which most 
resembles what she is proposing for the new terminal. Ms. Echelman staled lhal the project is an experiential aU-cncompassing work that brings people from the 
street to the waterfront and encourages people to linger and slay. Ms. Echelman then presented images of her proposal for the new sh 1 tci minal, slating lhal her goal 
was toercalconeintLTconuccledspace lhal unifies tin- Recomposurc Area with the Gate Ana Bused on the concept of air-ocean and the idea of making \is-ihfc Ihc 
Ruidit) of air, her pmposal eonsisis of stulpiural elements, inspired by airships and sea ships, suspended from the ceiling and possibly incorporated inlo (he Floi 1 
■ 

Archilci I Terence Young ol Gensler Architects slated thai Ihc forms arc interesting and open to interrelation but he wondered about thcshifl from atmosphere and 
wealbei patterns lolheun Icrwater. He suggested lhal Ms, Eclietman try to reinforce the atmosphere concept rather than the underwater. He aba inquircdahnul an 
overall estimate foi creating such a work Mr. Young continued lhal the original charge was In create an artwork diieclryaftersccuril) in the Recoinposure Area. While 
he likes the fact thai the work extends Ihroughoul ihc space, he slated that if the budget limits the work, he would like to sec the work primarily located in the 
Recomposurc \:>m 

Jefi Heno'ofGcnsler Architects stated lhal if the work does extendhcyond the RocomposurcArca, then perhaps it coukl he based he concept ol microclimates 

where the forms change in seal, and in shape to reflect different climates. Mr. Young slated lhal if Ms. Ecticlman's treatment of the ceiling is successful, it would most 
likely replace the sculptural ceiling designed by the architects. 

ronunLssi.mers slated their enthusiasm about the proposal. Commissioner t'mblvski expressed liei 'CXI ilemeiil in Working With Mv I., helmaii on lln- inipo riant 
project. She staled that she is a little hesitant in thinking about a total eiuonipassiiif; artwork lor the spaiv and stated thai as ihe Ait port is an organic building, artworks 

have a tendency to Ik- moved Ihroughoul lime. Commissioner Johnston .-aidthat he enjoyed thu transition between ail andwateranddidnol find the shit 1 problematic 
nil en the location of the Airport near the waler. Commissioner Wilscy agreed lhal there was a certain tranquility to the proposal and dial when passengers arrive al Ihe 
Airport for ihe first lime, their first encounter is the water 



Ms. p.. nitons slated that materials and maintenance will be an issue as the Airport I: 
ainoiinl of the contract with Janet Echelman for Phase l lo $244,000. 

Ms. Pontious then presented ihe work of artist Charles Sowers, who wiD develop a 
in aand the other in a more passive area. She stated lhal Mr Sowers could design 
artisl io explore and slated the preliminary budget for Ihe artworks is $100,000 



oil\ , 



St I'll 



1 the jets She then requested a 



uln 



t lo 



ise the 



arlwork(s) for Iwo "kids' Spots" locati 
1 single, signature work orn in< 



Terminal Two, one in a more active 
ntol work. She has left it open lor Ihe 



GOVERNMENT 
DOCUMENTS DEPT 

JUL -6 2010 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



■f3 



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SFGov 



http://www.sfgov3.org/archive.aspx7deptK3 108&sub— ' I 6&ypar= 



II IIS M( (IK IN I IAS BEEN AMENDED: 

Motion: Motion lo authorize die Dirrctororculiui-al Affairs to enter into un agreement with Janet Echelman foran amount nol to 
conceptual design through construction documents, Tot- an artwork alTerminul Two of Sun Francisco Intel-national Airport. 
Moved: Wilsey/Johnsloll 



[Motion: Motion to approve the selection orcluu'le.s Sowers to design :i 
I nlernalionnl Airport, and to authorize payment lo Charles Sowera in II 
Moved: Lloyd/.kilinslun 



«rtwork(s) to he located in the "Kids' Spot" liicalic 
amount of $1,000 for a design proposal. 



sinTei 



led $244,000 for Phase 1, 



linalTwn of the San Francisco 



1 San Kmrreisco General Hospital 

Ms. I'onlioUS staled that she would like Comlll 

mirks for the San Francisco General I lospitui's 



mors lo review and approve the artist pooLs chosen by the San 1 ; 
V Acute Care Unit. 



General Hospital Selection Panel lo create 



011 asked what percentage of artists in these pools is based in the San Francisco Day Area. Ms. Polrtious staled that fioni a qaick glance, about 75 
1 the pool selected For the new Acute Care Unit aie based in the San Francisco Bay Area, and about 50 percent of the artists in Uie pre-qualificd 
an Francisco liny Area. 



Commissioner Przvtilyski proposed adding artist Mildied Howard and Jill Manlon pioposed adding artist Julio Morales to the selected group for the new Acute Care 
Unit. 

Ms. I'oiilious explained that of the 630 applications, tile applications weie first prescrcellcd by curatorial consultant Chandra Cen-ito and then by Ms. Ponlious. The 
panel then teviewed the remaining l.'tn applications and identified tlie first group of artists for .specific opportunities in the new Acute Care Unit. The second group of 
pie-qualified artists will lie used lor other opportunities. Ms. i'onlious recommended Rupert Garcia, who received the highest score from the panel, as the lead artist 
lor the lobby area. She proposed an honorarium of $5,000 for Mr. Garcia to meet will] tile architects to review the design of the lobby and identify surfaces (i.e.- 
Icrnrao II ', glass, etc.) lo address, and then select an artist or artists from the pre-qualificd pool to work 011 bis team. 



Tl IIS MI/IK IN I IAS BEEN AMENDED: 

Motion: Motion lo approve the following list of artists and artist teams, who by virtue of the Sail Francisco General Hospital Selection Panel Sam will lie considered 

first for commission opportunities in the new Acute Care Unit: Rupert Gaieia, Deborah Roundu-ceand Brian Cl-otty, Izma Wolf. Loma Jordan, Lisa Levine, Paul 

Murioni and Ann Tiolilner; Joel Mcycrovvilz, Christian Mueller, Tom Olleniess. Susan Schwarlz.enberg, licliz Brother, Stephen Galloway, Cliff Garten. Paul Kos. Mike 

Malldei, Anna Mulch and Ding I lollLs. Masayuki Naga.se, Mildied 1 Inward, and Julio Morales. 

Moved:. lohnslon/Wilsi-y 



Motion: Motion lo approve the following artists as an additional pie-qualified pool lor any additional opportunities idea li lied at San Francisco General Hospital: 
Johanna Puulllig, John Rolofl. Nila Winter, Ed Carpenter, John Wchiie, Suikung Zhuu, Lynn Basa, James Carpenter, Michio [hara, Joe Thurston and Scan Healy, 
Amy Trachleliberg. Seycd Alav i, Hob Badger, Knlliy Bradford, Dana Zed, Tony llerlaal, Nancy Ilium, Chris Green, Henrv Doruke. Abhi Garrju, Merle Serial. 
Moved: Johnston/Lloyd 



Motion: Moliou lo approve Kupcrt Garcia, by virtue of having r 
General Hospital Acute Care Unit, and aulliorizulioti lo pay him 
Moved: Lloyd/Johnston 



cived the highest score from the panel, as die lead artist lor the entry lobby of lire San I-'r.i 
1 honorarium of $5,000 lo develop preliminary design concepts. 



Iiiglcsiric Brunch Library 

Project Manager Judy Muran presented the revised design by artisl Eric Powell Tor the lugleside Uraneli Library. She staled that Mr. Powell initially intended lo create a 
gale and partial fence artwork on the exterior ol the building, but Hie gale was loo small, needed too much ADA equipment, and the fence w:ls replaced with a chainlink 
fence, Tile next idea was lo create a sculpture in the patio aiea on one .side of the building, but the landscaping budget has been eliminated so il is not dear what the 
layout will be In collaboration with the architects, Ms. Moran determined thai the best location for artwork Is on lire rear wall of die main reading room, which is 31 
led wide- bv 4. r , feel high, above bookshelves. She stated thai Mr. Powell developed a proposal for the back wall after meeting with the community, who wanted an 
organ ie and colorful work. The work will have relief elements Willi some parts raised from the wall. 

Commissioner Frzyblyski staled that she would like lo see the design worked a lillle bit mole. She thought thai the design elements seerrred arbitrary and il was 
difficult lo determine lire direction ol lire work. Ms. Mor-arr responded Ihal she is happy lo continue wording with the artist on refining his design, but asked for a 
specific direction. Commissioner Przyblyski stated thai the design resembles nautilus shell patterns or lima beans and pretzels and was concerned Uial the patlerrr 
would look outdated over time. Commissioner Johnston slated thai il was unclear whether the work was supposed to be more representational or more abstract. 
Commissioner Przyblyski staled thai there was a certain graceful and gcslur-.il quality lo the curvilinear forms, bul lire for ins seemed rather heavy. Sire staled thai il 
seemed like the artist incorporated suggestions from the community, bat he did nol answer lire question for himself about what lie wanLs the artwork to be. She also 
suggested Ihal the artist present an image of lire design in lire actual location lo gel a better sense of the work. 



Tl IIS Ml ri'lON WAS POSTI'I INED: 

Motion: Motion lo approve the final design of a 30-fool-long glazed 11 

authorize lire artisl lo proceed lo fabrication. 



•lal wall relic I artwork for llu 



v 1 nglcsidc Branch Library bv artist Eric Powell alrd to 



Civic Ar-t Collection 

Collections Manager Allison Cummings reported on lire following Collections projects: llie repair of vandalism of Tlte Holocaust, 1982, by George Segal, and the 
removal and storage of Conquest of Space, 1983, by Ruliiin Tnmuyo, from Terminal Two al San Francisco International Airport. Ms. Cnniniiiigs slated Ihal swastikas 
within Slats ol David were drawn onto the marble plaques as well as the main figure of lire I lolocaust sculpture. On Wednesday. November 12, there was some 
treatment to alleviate llie damage; a conservator will create a more detailed assessment on Friday, November 21 . She stated thai there is a surveillance camera located 
over the piece and the police arc currently reviewing the tape for suspects. 



Ci 



r- Pr/yblyski asked if lucre was a sign staling that the piece is under surveillance and Ms. Cummings responded thai the video cameras are very v i 
■d directly above the sculpture. Ms. Manlon staled Ihal she Iras received a donation from a concerned and generous individual lor tile repair and 
af the sculpture. 



ihle 



M.s. Cummings reported Ihal lire Tamayo sculpture was successfully removed from Terminal Two, Willi rigging assistance from Althowv Fine Art Services, The pice 
currently in a storage yard next lo the Airport M useum's offices and the vvoik will be iv-inslallcd in 2O09. She staled that there has been extensive video 
documentation of the deinslallation. 



Civic Center Plaza - Temporary Sculpture Proposal 

Ms. Manlon reported on plans lo install a temporary willow sapling sculpture by artisl Patrick Dougherty in Civic Center Plaza, and thanked DircclorolCidlur-.il Allans. 
Luis K. Cancel for bringing the project to the attention of the Mayor's Office, she reported that installation will lake llrrvc weeks, beginning in February, slu- explained 
Ihal she docs nol have a new proposal lo show, although lire proposal has elrarrged a little in that il will utilize both lows of sycamore trees, and start orr III.- north siik- 
ol lire plaza and move lo the south. She asked Cominlssioneis lo appiove the motion 011 good I'ailll so she earl cuter into coll tract with the artist irr lime for the project. 
In response lo Commissioner Przyblyski's inquiry aboul llie usefulness of studcnl assistants, M.s, Manlon staled Ihal the arllsl had said Ihal lids project was probably 
nol appropriate lor a gloupol sludeliLs because of llie delicate nature of the sycamores and the need to work on ladders. She staled Ihal the work wnuklh.-nli view loi 
al least one year, hopefully Iwo. 



Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs loenti 
sculpture in Civic Cell Icr Plaza lor a total amount mil lo exceed 560 
as identification plaques, 
Moved: l.lovd/.lolinsloll 






ith Patrick Dougherty tortile installation ol a temporary wjlowaupiing 
development, fabrication, Ir.1ll.1pnrlnli1.11 ami installation of the artwoii as well 



Chinese Recreation Center- 
Ms. Manlon reported on a new public art enrichment oppoi liniiiy al llie Chinese Kccrcalion Center on Mason und Washington stivers In Chinatown. The new 
construction will generate about 5200,000 in all enrichment lands. She exhibited images ol tile architect's drawings of tile new building and slated thai llie Civic 
Design Review Coiiiinillee hud asked lire arelrilecLs lo redesign lire entrance. Ms. Manlon announced Ihal there will be a competition tor Ibis project and pointed oul 
art opportunities to work Willi the architects oil Hie building entry or lo develop u design for the gluss curtain wuD.Othcrpossiblc opportunities irrelude a Ule treauncnl 
along the: si iicco base ol the building which rises lo a heighl ol 'fourteen feel, ill the playground entry gale and surrounding fence. She explained Ihal the Kcrreali,,,! 
and Park Department preferred the slucco base lo tile in order to deter graffiti. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated Ihal it is an intensely programmed space and the design of the building has a nice complete quality. She slated that she would rather 
see something more celebratory that continues Hie gesture down lo llie base, hut cautioned against creating a dispersed pattern on the Facade of the building. Ms. 

Manlon slaled Ihal the fence around llie playground area could be air opportunity lor a jel-cul llie lal work based on lire design ol Chinese papcreUloUts. She explained 
Ihal such a design would not compete with the building but create Something special oil either side. 



Mil 111 cable car on one side III: 
inclined logallieral the culra 
the gates al the hack would be 



I Dial gales me popular ill Chinatown ami explained Ihal Ule images of tile building are a l-.il misleading us Hie urea is quite dense, with 11 
I is busy luciily -lour hours a day. He aLso explained thai Mason Street is extremely sloped near that intersection, so people will be more 
ice 1111 tiic corner mlhcr Hum along Hie sides of Hie building, Commissioner Przyblyski slaled Hull an artwork al llie entrance and along 
line way in which the art could enhance the overall design and look of the building. 



Ms. Manlon slaled thai she will meet wilh Hie Citizens Advisory Gump lo discuss va 
lor this project ami the Arts Commission hopes lo have an artisl on board during llu 



ous approaches and solicit llu 
ally spring of 2009. 



Iipill. She slaled Ihal Ihciv will be 



M|>>ll 



all 



<J, Hayes Valley PlnyKI-uiriid 

Ms. Manlon presented a new public ail enrichment opportunity at 1 luyes Valley Playground located al I luycs arrd Buchanan Streets, she explained thai lire artwork 
will be partly funded by a grant from llie Tills! lor- Public Lund. She presented preliminary drawings uf Hie playground mid staled thai the landscape archilecl 
i-ceouuuciided two urlisls-LaurelTmu and Eric Powell-lo create u public artwork for the site, willi an art budget of $25,000. Slut uskadColuinlasionenfartliQlr 

feedback aboul llie landscape architect's rccoiiiiiicndaUoas. 

Commissioner Pr/yblyskistulcd that lire site is small bul highly programmed and llie desitv Ls lo maximize even dollar possible. She explained Ihal the anhilecl.s and 
the community want 10 work closely wilh all artist and Ihal a mosaics artisl would he all appropriate arrd sensible choice. Ms, Manlon explained thai I auivl line has a 
relationship wilh Ural comiiiiiuitv ami works closely wilh youth. Tile goal will be to commission artwork thai enhances Hie playground without taking up loo much 



1.1. New Businc 
Ms. Manton 11 



oggin's and Dorka Kcclm's IjinawycoJ the Birds on Sunday, November 23, al tin 



ol llioudwaviilid 



2 of 3 



' 6 Mil' 3 59 I 



htlp://www.sfgov3.org/archivc.aspx?dcpt^3 108&sub= 3 1 16&ycar=2. 



Columbus Streets. She stated that Mr. Cancel will be the Master of Ccrcronuies and the Ai^CxiiiimL^ioiiUpailnDringwitli(hcDcpiiitiijpnlfirPubIicWn)'1csC ll DPW n ) 
in hire parking control officers and obtain permits to close the street, She slated thai there was one unexpected problem with tin- pouredconcrctc being darker than 
expected and therefore making the embedded text difficult to read. Shcslated Uiatonosolution would be to sandblast the paving in oitlerto bring out the aggregate in 
the concrete, 

Ms Mnnton also announced the dedication of Ainana Johrwon'ssculplurc77nicWo/>cuni. which look place on November iH at the Joseph P. Ijw Recreation center in 
Bayvicw. Mr. Cancel stated that the sculpture consisted of a wryembraccablcsiltingfeurc on n platform. Ms. Manlon slated that there are plans lo hold a workshop 
nidi il„ artist and the children al the Center. 

Commissioner Przyblyxki expressed her concern over the design of the La Grande PompStntion in the Excelsior District, which looks like a Iwo-slory Marina-style 
house with no windows. The upgrade results in $30,000 for art enrichment and Commissioner Przyblyski asked Ihe Public Utilities Commission ("POC") to consider 
commissioning a public artwork for ihe site instead of pooling funds because the r.xcclsior is underscrved in public ari. She staled ilia 1 jus 1 because ihc facade remains 
blank does not mean the building remains anonymous ordoes nol call attention lo itself. Commissioner I'mblyski expressed her concern thai Ihc PUC currently has a 
minimum standard ivhcn ii comes lo design whereas I'UC buildings haw been historically beautiful, 

M>, Mnnlon announced Ihnllbny I abaft Big Peace /sculpture trill be installed in Die first nr second week ><l December. The loan agreement includes Ihc option to 
accept ibe work into iho City's Civic Vrt Collection. Ms. Mnnlon staled Ihutshc recently received a call from the Chief Curator in Oakland who is interested in 
purchasing the woi k and reimbursing Ihc Arts Commission for related expenses. 

Ms. Cummings provided an update on Ihe restoration ol Bufano's s sculpture entitled Peace on Brotherhood Way. Phase 1 will most likely like place in Ihc summer of 
2009. The sculpture was bsingiLs tesserae and ihc mosaic needed to be stabilized, Preliminary slabilizalion is being paid rorhy the conservation budget. 

Mr. Cancel stated thai lie would like the Visual Arts Committee to brainstorm ways lo augment the limited pool of funds forconservalion. hie stated thai with 
increasing incidences ol vandalism, there is a lii>;li public cxpa tation thai the artworks should In- quickly repaired 1 Ic slated Ilia) Ibis discussion item should be placed 
on the VAC agenda and the Committee should explore the option of increasing the conservation budget with funds from other agencies, 

Ms. Shifflerannounccd lhat Ihc current exhibition in the 401 Van Ness gallery tilled litis PhceCatied Poetry, which celebrates WritersCorps' i,ih anniversary, is a 
successful collaboration between two programs of the Arts Commission. The exhibition is very professional and follows Ihe stringent aesthetic glandurdsol the Gallery, 
Ihc same standards followed by outside curators who organize exhibitions al Ihc Caller) . 

Commissioner Johnslon announced dial the artists who created the bust of Harvey Milk for City Hall, Ihe Daub Pirmin Hendrbksoh Sculpture Group, donated a 
variation of the busl lo Treasure Island .lob Corps Center; trainees fabricated the base. The administration building at the Center will also be- renamed after Harvey 
Milk. 'Die dedication and unveiling will take place on November 25, 2008. 



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7/6/2010 3:59 PM 



: January 2 1,2009 



http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfacj3age.asp7icH96930 



San Francisco Arts Commission 



LISTEN 

TEXT ONLY 

PRINT 

A 

A 

A 



January 21, 2009 



01-2^-09P03:29 RCVO 






VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, January 21, 2009 

3:00 p.m. 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 

Agenda 



1. Consent Calendar 



GOVERNMENT 
DOCUMENTS DEPT 

JAN 2 6 2009 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



1. Motion to accept the Visitacion Valley Branch Library selection panel's recommendation 
of the following artists as finalists for the Visitacion Valley Branch Library project and to 
authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to pay each of the artists or artist teams an 
honorarium in the amount of $500 for the development of a site-specific proposal for the 
project: Johanna Poethig, the artist team of Fran Martin and Jim Growden, the artist 
team of Mark Grieve and liana Spector, and an alternate, Amy Trachtenberg. 

2. Motion to accept the Ortega Branch Library selection panel's recommendation of the 
following artists as finalists for the Ortega Branch Library project and to authorize the 
Director of Cultural Affairs to pay each of the artists or artist teams an honorarium in the 
amount of $500 for the development of a site-specific proposal for the project: Sheila 
Ghidini, Gerald Heffernon, Wowhaus, and an alternate, Seyed Alavi. 

3. Motion to accept the Bayview Branch Library selection panel's recommendation of the 
following artists as finalists for the Bayview Branch Library project and to authorize the 
Director of Cultural Affairs to pay each of the artists or artist teams an honorarium in the 
amount of $500 for the development of a site-specific proposal for the project: Marion 
Coleman, Mildred Howard, Ron Moultrie Saunders, and an alternate, Amy Trachtenberg. 

2. California Street Steps Proposal 

Jill Manton 

Update on the proposal by the Friends of Lincoln Park for the beautification of the 

California Street Steps. 

Motion: Motion to approve the proposed design for the beautification of the California 
Street Steps and to support the intent of the gift to the City, pending ability of Friends of 
Lincoln Park to raise funds for the implementation and maintenance of the artwork. 



1/20/2009 3:54 PM 



sfac: January 2 1 , 2009 http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp .'id= 

3. Public Utilities Commission ("PUC") Funding 

Jill Manton 

Update on art enrichment funding from the PUC. 

4. Transbay Transit Center Public Art Program 

Jill Manton 

Informational update on first meeting of the Transbay Art Steering Committee meeting 

and selection of artist finalists. 

5. Lake Merced Temporary Art in Natural Settings 

Regina Almaguer 

Presentation of new proposal by John Melvin for Lake Merced Temporary Art in Natural 

Settings. 

Motion: Motion to approve the preliminary proposal by John Melvin for Lake Merced, 
pending approval from the PUCs Natural Areas Program and the Lake Merced Task Force. 

6. Moscone Recreation Center 

Regina Almaguer 

Presentation of further development of artwork proposal by Kent Roberts for the Moscone 

Recreation Center. 

Motion: Motion to approve the design development of the artwork proposal by Kent 
Roberts for Moscone Recreation Center. 

7. San Francisco International Airport - Terminal 2 

Susan Pontious 
Staff Report 

Presentation on Norie Sato's design for the glass facade screen of Terminal Two at San 
Francisco International Airport. Report on installation of new plaque honoring former 
Airport Commissioner William Coblents (see Staff Report). 

Motion: Motion to approve the Selection Panel recommendation of Norie Sato's design 
for the glass facade screen for Terminal Two at San Francisco International Airport and to 
authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with the artist for an 
amount not to exceed $1,000,000 to design, fabricate, transport and install the artwork. 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural affairs to enter into an agreement 
not to exceed $20,000 with Daub Firmin Studios to design and fabricate a plaque 
honoring former Airport Commissioner William Coblents for San Francisco International 
Airport. 

8. Laguna Honda Hospital 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation on revised lobby murals by Owen Smith for Laguna Honda Hospital. 

2 of 4 1/20/2009 3 



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Motion: Motion to approve the revised lobby mural designs by artist Owen Smith for 
Laguna Honda Hospital. 

9. San Francisco General Hospital 

Susan Pontious 

Presentation of preferred sites for the relocation of two monumental sculptures located at 

San Francisco General Hospital, due to the construction of the new Acute Care Center. 

Motion: Motion to approve relocation of Gerald Walburg's Stiff Loops (1978.52) to the 
South East corner of the San Francisco General Hospital campus. 

Motion: Motion to approve the relocation of Beniamino Bufano's Madonna (1974.21) to 
the garden located South of Building 80 on the San Francisco General Hospital campus. 

10. Art on Market Street Program 

Judy Moran 
Staff Report 

Presentation of the revised Art on Market Street Poster Project proposal by artist Kota 
Ezawa and a proposal by Colter Jacobsen. 

Motion: Motion to approve the Art on Market Street Poster Project proposal by artist 
Kota Ezawa and to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with 
Kota Ezawa for the design and printing of six posters and a related public event in an 
amount not to exceed $18,000. 

Motion: Motion to approve the Art on Market Street Poster Project proposal by artist 
Colter Jacobsen and to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract 
with Colter Jacobsen for the design and printing of six posters and a related public event 
in an amount not to exceed $18,000. 

11. Broadway Streetscape 

Tonia Macneil 
Staff Report 

Presentation of completed artwork Language of the Birds by Brian Goggin with Dorka 
Keehn and the November 23, 2008 unveiling ceremony. 

Motion: Motion to approve the completion of Language of the Birds by Brian Goggin and 
Dorka Keehn consisting of twenty-three LED-illuminated white polycarbonate books 
suspended between lighting poles from steel cables and text etched into the surface of 
the new plaza, at Broadway and Columbus, with the exception of the concrete color and 
text installation by others. 

12. New Business 



1/20/2009 3:54 PM 



sfac: January 2 1 , 2009 http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp .'id=S 



13. Old Business 

14. Adjournment 

MC 1/16/2009 
Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts 
Commission office, 25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during 
regular business hours. INFO: Mary Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of 
the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic 
devices are prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the 
removal from the meeting of any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell 
phone, pager, or other similar sound-producing electronic devices. 
Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or 
administrative action may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San 
Francisco Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register 
and report lobbying activity. For more information about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please 
contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San Francisco, CA 94102 - 
telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and http://www.sfqov.org/ethics . 
KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. 
Commissions, boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct 
the people's business. This ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the 
people and that City operations are open to the people's review. For more information on 
your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report a violation of the ordinance, 
contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine Ordinance Task 
Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by 
phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at sotf (5) sfgov.org . 



4 of 4 1/20 2009 3:5- 



STAFF REPORT 

DATE: January 21, 2009 

TO: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Susan Pontious 

RE: San Francisco International Airport - New Plaque 

Please see the attached letter from the San Francisco International Airport. 



SFO 



/ 



■r^U'^^'-L 



i\ I 



Uf- 




San Francisco International Airport 



December 3, 2008 



P.O. Box 8097 

San Francisco, CA 941 28 

Tel 650.821.6700 

Fax 650.821.6777 

www.sfoArts.org 



Mr. Luis R. Cancel 

Director of Cultural Affairs 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

25 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

Dear Luis, 

The Airport Commission is in the process of renovating Terminal 2, and we are naming 
the concourse in honor of past Airport Commissioner Bill Coblentz. Commemorating 
past commissioners within the terminals has involved producing plaques on designated 
wall spaces. 

It would be very much appreciated if the Arts Commission would assist in the 
production of a plaque honoring Commissioner Coblentz by contracting the services of 
the Daub & Firmin Studios. This particular studio produced plaques for two of our 
former Airport Commission Presidents, and it seems fitting to contract that studio's 
services once again to remain consistent. The Airport Commission would work order 
funds to the Arts Commission to handle the costs of the plaque's production. 

As always, your consideration of this request would be very much appreciated. Please 
feel free to contact me if you have any concerns. 

I thank you for your assistance and wish you and your staff the best in 2009. 

Very truly yours, 






John L. Martin 
Airport Director 




Airijo. t Mi •'.feu r 




ct: Blake Summers, SF Airport Museums 

Susan Pontious, Curator, SF Arts Commission 



STAFF REPORT 

DATE: January 21, 2009 

TO: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Judy Moran 

RE: Art on Market Street Program update 



Art on Market Street 2008 Program summary 

Golden Gate Comics, the current Art on Market Street Kiosk Poster Project, is the last in the 
2008 series of three poster projects, all with a narrative theme. Below is a brief description of 
the projects. 

• The first project in the series, Dashiell Hammett 's San Francisco, by Owen Smith, 
focused on Hammett's novel, The Maltese Falcon, and included a walking tour of sites 
associated with the novel led by Don Herron, who has conducted Hammett tours in San 
Francisco for over 30 years. One of the paintings that Smith created for the project, 
Brigid, has won two awards: a Silver Medal from the publication Creative Quarterly, 
with the painting appearing in the upcoming Issue 14. The painting was also selected for 
Illustrators 51, a book and gallery exhibition at the Society of Illustrators of New York. 
The Arts Commission will receive credit for this project in both publications. 

• The second project, Flor de Manila y San Francisco, by artist Jenifer Wofford, illustrated 
the story of Flor Villanueva, a nurse who emigrates from the Philippines to San Francisco 
in 1973. The project included a panel discussion at the Kearny Street Workshop with 
three distinguished experts on Filipino immigration issues, and the history of the Filipino 
community in San Francisco and the nursing profession which is so prevalent in that 
community here and internationally . Artweek included a review of the posters in its 
December 2008/January 2009 issue. 

• For the third and current project, Golden Gate Comics, the artists Briana Miller and Thien 
Pham, created a comic book with a superhero, a sweet romance, and an encounter with 
dastardly villains. As part of the project, the Arts Commission is collaborating with the 
Cartoon Art Museum to present a hands-on comic book workshop on January 25 th at the 
Museum. The project was featured in the December 21 st SF Chronicle's Pink Section's 
This Week's pick for Monday 22nd, and the Chronicle's 96 Hours section will include a 
feature on the project and the artists in the January 22 nd issue. 

A catalog for the 2008 Art on Market Street series will include images of the six original posters 
in each of the three series, with a brief essay about each project. 



Art on Market Street Program 2009 Program plans 

The theme for the 2009 Program is photographically-based art projects that are developed from 
photographs rather than incorporating them directly into the images. The imagery may be hand 
drawn or created digitally, among other techniques. 

Two proposals will be presented at the Visual Arts Committee meeting for this series from artists 
Kota Ezawa and Colter Jacobsen, both of whom the VAC has previously approved to prepare 
proposals. Both artists' have worked with photographically-based imagery. 

• Kota Ezawa creates still images and animated films based on photographs translated into 
flat color compositions through manual tracings of the source material. He has received 
wide acclaim for his animated film based on a segment of the videotapes of the O.J. 
Simpson trial. Kota Ezawa' s written proposal is attached. A proposal image for one of the 
posters will be presented at the VAC meeting. 

• Colter Jacobsen' s artworks are hand-rendered drawings from found photographs, often 
snapshots, that may be single, composite, or collaged images. Colter Jacobsen' s proposal 
will be presented at the VAC meeting. 

Art on Market Street 2010 Program 

I am exploring possible themes for the 2010 Program and would appreciate any suggestions from 
VAC members for themes as well as artists. A Call for Artists for the 2010 Program will be 
posted in February of this year. 









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oceanic cartography, without knowledge 

of the artist's work, Colbum's process of 

removal is evident and intriguing. FOR 

THE DEEP is less specifically map-based 

than some of her previous work, such as 

Just Below (2005) at Yerba Buena Center 

for the Arts, which showed the networks 

of sewers, water pipes and creeks run- , 

ning below the surface of the city. j 

The sunny and warm Kala studio 
appears to be a lovely place to work and 
viewing the exhibition on a Saturday 
afternoon — while artists and staff flipped 
through magazines, made tea and fiddled 
with paper — was an inspired way to look 
at art. Kudos to Kala for exhibiting art 
within the context of a residency, rather 
than divorcing the work from its process. 

— Cassie Riger 

Residency Projects Part 4 closed 
November 22 at Kala Art Institute, Berkeley. 

Cassie Riger is freelance writer based in 
San Francisco. 



Jenifer K. Wofford on 
Market Street kiosks 

ince 1992, the San 
Francisco Arts 
Commission has been 
inviting artists to produce 
a series of large posters 
that are installed along 
the advertising kiosks of 
Market Street. As a pub- 
lic art project, the series avoids static 
sculptures or installations in favor of a 
rotating engagement with the histories of 
downtown San Francisco, provocatively 
nestled within the increasingly con- 
sumer-focused streetscape of advertising 
and sales announcements. 

For the latest installment of the pro- 
ject, Jenifer K. Wofford has created large 
storyboard posters that narrate the story 
of her fictional character, Flor 
Villanueva, as she immigrates and adapts 
to San Francisco during the 1970s. 
Moving up and down Market Street, one 
can traverse a kind of dispersed gallery of 
episodes in the life of Flor. The narra- 
tive, broken into six yearlong "chapters," 
follows Flor from her home in Manila to 
San Francisco, negotiating the immi- 
grant experience, and the relationship 
between setting down new roots and 
remaining tethered to family and home. 
Throughout, Wofford shows how Flor's 
experience takes place within a larger 
context of world events, including 
charged episodes in the local histories of 
both Manila and San Francisco. How 
Flor narrates these relations becomes as 
much a part of the story as any individual 
plot element, and we come to understand 
how the diasporic condition is not just 
one of migration and integration, but of 





Jenifer Wofford, Ror 1973 Skytab, poster reproduction, 
67" x 46", at San Francisco Arts Commission's Art on 
Market Street 



tional, and how one relates the experi- 
ence of these negotiations. 

Each poster features a handful of 
images, along with a simple caption that 
might push the story forward or suggest 
certain historical background events that, 
in many ways, "teach" Flor (and us) as 
much about America as do her daily 
encounters with work and local culture. 
Additionally, important events in Filipino 
and Filipino-American history appear, 
like martial law in Manila, or the famous 
I-Hotel battle, where the modern ten- 
ants-rights movement began with the 
defense of a SRO hotel for elderly 
Filipino-American maritime workers in 
San Francisco's Manilatown. Mixing 
Tagalog with English, Flor voices her 
own version of these events, just as 
Wofford subtly uses background and 
color to evoke the immigrant experience 
of 1970s San Francisco without suc- 
cumbing to cliche tropes of the "coming- 
of-age" story. While clearly drawing on 
the tradition of pedagogical comics (we 
learn about '70s Filipino politics, dias- 
poric economies and culture, etc.), these 
don't feel didactic or moralistic, and 
instead capture one character's experi- 
ence of San Francisco during the second 
big wave of Asian-American immigra- 
tion. "I feel like a real San Franciscan 
now, but I'm still 100% Manila," Flor 
says at the end of her six-year journey, 
and we can see how the two identifica- 
tions could find an organic, if uneasy, 
resolution in Flor's experience of her 
world. 

The posters mix elements of comic 
books and graphic novels, such as 
Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, children's 
educational posters and the light box 
work of artists like Jeff Wall or Kota 
Ezawa, using the advertising kiosks' 
nighttime lighting to great effect (at 



unique without drawing attention 
to their manipulation; each 
episode has its own palette and 
feel. Playful yet serious, Wofford 
strikes an effective balance 
throughout Flor's "Six Years." 

Depending on how one tra- 
verses Market Street, there is no 
guarantee that viewers will read 
the story in chronological order. 
As such, each poster can stand 
alone as a discrete work, while 
also suggesting narrative continu- 
ity and history, like an episode or 
chapter in a memoir. Whether or 
not pedestrians will be pulled into 
Flor's story such that they will 
search out additional chapters is 
an open question, which is of 
course a challenge for any of the 
Art on Market Street projects: 
how to make stand-alone works 
that still address local histories 
and movement along the down- 
town avenue. Wofford's Flor, in 
this way, invites us along on a 
walking tour of her story, as if a 
comic book were published on site rather 
than stapled together into a portable 
object. 

— David Buuck 



Jenifer K. Wofford: Flor de Manila y San 
Francisco, a project of the San Francisco Arts 
Commission's Art on Market Street will be on 
view through December 1 9 on the pedestrian 
side of the triangular kiosks on both sides of 
Market Street, between Van Ness and the 
Embarcadero, San Francisco. 

David Buuck is a contributing editor to 
Artweek 



'Double Exposure: 
African Americans 
Before and Behind the 
Camera' at MOAD 



T 



he exhibition 
Double Exposure: 
African 

Americans Before 
and Behind the 
Camera, orga- 
nized by the 
Amistad Center 
for Art & Culture and presented at the 
Museum of the African Diaspora in San 
Francisco, takes photography of and by 
African Americans as its starting point. 
Deliberately loose, this framework could 
include any number of objects and cura- 
tors. Lisa Henry and W Frank Mitchell 
work within these parameters to intro- 
duce several themes, and to show the 
work of emerging and well-known con- 
temporary artists as well as historic works 
culled from the Amistad Center's nine- 



Poster Mashups 

A proposal for the Art on Market Street Kiosk Poster Series 
By Kota Ezawa 



For the Art on Market Street Kiosk Poster Series I would like to produce a series of 
drawings based on poster advertisements that are (or were) on display in the Market 
Street Kiosks. Each drawing combines the image content of one advertisement with the 
text slogan of another. Rather than adding to the surplus of visual information that 
confronts pedestrians on Market Street, this project attempts to reduce and recycle what is 
already there and to offer a look at advertising imagery and language detached from its 
original purpose. 

The title of the project pays homage to a genre of music called Mashup, in which samples 
of more than one song are combined in a new composition. Like the music compositions, 
Poster Mashups brings together disparate elements to create an alternative experience to 
the one provided by the source material. By returning the borrowed advertising image 
and text slogan to its origin (the Market Street Kiosk) in an altered form Poster Mashups 
causes a feedback loop in which output and input interact with each other. The purpose of 
this poster series is not to mock or make fun of advertising, but to transform the activity 
of looking at poster ads into an encounter with art. 

For the past seven years I have created animated films, lightbox displays, prints and other 
types of media in which moving and still photographic images have been translated into 
flat color compositions through manual tracings of photographic source material. The 
sources for these projects have ranged from TV news footage to Hollywood films and 
from historic photographs to amateur snap shots. My projects have been shown as gallery 
installations and in cinema screenings. Poster Mashups is an extension of this larger 
project, addressing advertising culture as a subject and using an outdoor public space as a 
venue. 



STAFF REPORT 



DATE: 
TO: 
FROM: 
RE: 



January 21, 2009 

Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 
Tonia Macneil 
Broadway Streetscape 



Project: Language of the Birds 

Artist: Brian Goggin with Dorka Keehn 

Budget: $35,000 Art Enrichment funds, $83,000 private donations, $125,000 DPW 

construction funds, plus substantial volunteer support. 
RE: Request for limited approval of the artwork. 

Brian Goggin's Language of the Birds was unveiled to great fanfare on Sunday, November 23, 
2008. The installation was completed on Friday, November 21. The artwork has been completed 
as specified with the exception of the text embedded in the Broadway plaza sidewalk. This 
aspect of the artists' design was performed by the DPW subcontractor. The text as installed 
deviates from the approved mockup in that it is not permanent, as it would have been if 
fabricated in accordance with the pavement text specifications. In addition, the plaza paving has 
already been patched with a different color of concrete from the original. Therefore we are 
requesting limited approval of the artwork until these issues can be resolved. 

A meeting to attempt to resolve these outstanding issues will take place on Friday, January 16. 
The results of that meeting will be reported at the Visual Arts Committee meeting. 



John K. Melvin 

SF Arts Commission - Temporary Projects in Natural Settings 

Project Proposal for Lake Merced Installation 

House Boats for Birds 

Rev. 12.04.08 



Proposed Site: 

Northwest Corner of North Lake - Lake Merced 

San Francisco is considered to be a socially conscious city grappling with the implications of gentrification. At the 
city's edge lies Lake Merced; the lake's history and even location are unfamiliar to SF natives. This natural lake is 
bounded by urban development on nearly every edge. Within its environs, human intervention fluctuates 
between recreation and preservation, at times with no clear distinction. The varied sociology, climatology, and 
ecology of Lake Merced are key actors in my conceptual exploration. Furthermore, the subject of ecology, 
subsequent efforts of categorization, classification, and definition by our culture figures strongly in the context of 
Lake Merced. 

Lake Merced's sensitive ecology has been a subject for the better part of a hundred years in respect to San 
Francisco's history. The lake's ecology has gone from neglected to protected and back again, with at times 
catastrophic consequences. Not only is this project a public art project, it is also a temporary project in natural 
settings; thus, it is hoped that this project, throughout its development, has remained sensitive to the lake's 
ecology. 

This project has spanned a year in development and seeks to profit from associations both professional and 
community that have been gained during that process. A large majority of those discussions noted in the official 
minutes of several meetings frame the following proposal. 

Project Summary: 

An Installation consisting of approximately 20 to 30 rectangular open containers each 35' wide by 48' long and 4' 
tall will float on the lake's surface in a grid like pattern. The containers will be individually tethered to anchors on 
the bottom of the lake, will be constructed of PVC pipe, and wrapped in day-glow orange construction temporary 
non-biodegradable safety netting. The tethering will allow each individual container to move in response to wind 
and surface fluctuations at the site. Given past experience with previous proposals at Lake Merced, the ideal site 
will again most likely be the northwest corner of the lake; however the project's exact location within this site is 
subject to collaborative discussions with government and community agencies not limited to but focused on the 
Natural Areas Program and Golden Gate Audubon Society. 

Concept: 

Drawing boundaries or highlighting areas speaks to the act of containment which in itself speaks to categorization 
and classification. By distinguishing non-sites within the lake it is hoped that formally the site of the lake at large 
will be called into question. Conceptually the containers will be city nesting projects for birds under attack by feral 
cats. Whether or not these containers are used by the birds is beside the point, rather what is at issue here is the 
role that humans want to play in a post climate change aware society. Population trends in human species put 
pressure on development and as the fencing material is common to urban construction projects the connection 
should be accessible. Continuing with the commentary on development, the containers will be laid out as if there 
were a housing development project on a neatly contained, uniform grid. 

Project Duration: 

Given the expected low impact of this project, actual duration is subject to continued collaborative discussion. At 
this point, it is proposed that exhibition duration be one month or two months, preferably during a time when 



John K. Melvin 

SF Arts Commission - Temporary Projects in Natural Settings 

Project Proposal for Lake Merced Installation 

House Boats for Birds 

Rev. 12.04.08 

school is in session to facilitate public symposiums. The low-tech aspects of the project give it a fabrication 
advantage and the project could be installed as early as this coming spring. 

Observation & Reclamation: 

The individual containers function like dirigibles and can easily be floated to a nearby boat ramp for easy removal. 
As with other works sited in the environment a system of constant surveillance will be a component of future 
detailed proposals. 

Sculptural Details: 

The PVC pipe will form the principle structure to which the fencing is attached. PVC pipe has a precedent of being 
used in potable water applications and all solvents, glues, or otherwise will be the same as is used in the plumbing 
industry thereby posing no foreseeable threat to the environment. The ultimate gauge of the pipe will be 
dependent on field tests for buoyancy but should not need to exceed 8 inch interior diameter. Should cabling be 
required for stability in the corners of the container it will be of a marine grade from a supplier with established 
history of marine applications. 

Each container will be tethered by marine grade cable or rope depending on engineering that is then attached to a 
suitable anchor. Clearly turbidity is an issue given the Lake's ecology and an appropriate anchor wili be 
researched for application. Length of the tether will be dependent on wind pattern analysis; once done, this data 
will be specified to the commission. 

Logistics of Installation: 

Details to be provided after initial approval from commission. Suffice it to say that a small install crew with boats 
will place anchors with tether lines for attachment to individual containers. The crew will require use of the boat 
ramp typically utilized by the Dragon Boats. The containers are expected to relatively quick to fabricate and can 
be assembled on the shore perhaps in the large grass field at the south end of North Lake. From here the small 
crew can carry the containers down the ramp to be floated to the specific attachment point. 



°1 



c: January 2 1 , 2009 http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp7icH97527 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

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A 

A 

A 

I January 21, 2009 • GOVERNMENT 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE DOCUMENTS DEPT 

Wednesday, January 21, 2009 

3:00 p.m. JAN 2 9 2009 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 

Minutes SAN FRANCISCO 

Commissioners Present: PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Jeannene Przyblyski, Lorraine Garcia-Nakata, Alexander Lloyd, P.J. Johnston 
Absent: Dede Wilsey 

Staff Present: 

Luis Cancel, Mary Chou, Allison Cummings, Marcus Davies, Tonia Macneil, Jill Manton, 
Judy Moran, Susan Pontious 

Note: All votes are unanimous unless recorded otherwise. 
The meeting commenced at 3:06 p.m. 
1. Consent Calendar 

1. Motion to accept the Visitacion Valley Branch Library selection panel's recommendation 
of the following artists as finalists for the Visitacion Valley Branch library project and to 
authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to pay each of the artists or artist teams an 
honorarium in the amount of $500 for the development of a site-specific proposal for the 
project: Johanna Poethig, the artist team of Fran Martin and Jim Growden, the artist 
team of Mark Grieve and liana Spector, and an alternate, Amy Trachtenberg. 

2. Motion to accept the Ortega Branch Library selection panel's recommendation of the 
following artists as finalists for the Ortega Branch Library project and to authorize the 
Director of Cultural Affairs to pay each of the artists or artist teams an honorarium in the 
amount of $500 for the development of a site-specific proposal for the project: Sheila 
Ghidini, Gerald Heffernon, Wowhaus, and an alternate, Seyed Alavi. 

3. Motion to accept the Bayview Branch Library selection panel's recommendation of the 
following artists for the Bayview Branch Library project and to authorize the Director of 
Cultural Affairs to pay each of the artists or artist teams an honorarium in the amount of 
$500 for the development of a site-specific proposal for the project: Marion Coleman, 
Mildred Howard, Ron Moultrie Saunders, and an alternate, Amy Trachtenberg. 

Motion: Motion to adopt the consent calendar items. 



1/28/2009 2: 19 PM 



sfac: January 2 1 , 2009 http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac _page.asp?id=9 

Moved: Johnston/Lloyd 

2. California Street Steps Proposal 

Public Art Program Director Jill Manton provided an update on the proposal by the 
Friends of Lincoln Park for the beautification of the California Street Steps. She stated 
that all the costs associated with the implementation of the proposal will be raised 
privately. The Friends will also repair the existing condition of the stairway before the 
installation of the tiles. After completion of the project, the Recreation and Park 
Department has agreed to repair the concrete steps. The Friends have pledged to raise 
an additional $45,000 for the maintenance reserve, which will be used exclusively by 
SFAC. She stated that the motion associated with this proposal is one for support rather 
than acceptance so that the Friends can begin their fundraising in earnest. Ms. Manton 
stated that this would be a beautiful enhancement to Lincoln Park at no cost to the City. 
Commissioners expressed their support for the project. 

Motion: Motion to approve the proposed design for the beautification of the California 
Street Steps and to support the intent of the gift to the City, pending ability of Friends of 
Lincoln Park to raise funds for the implementation and maintenance of the artwork. 
Moved: Johnston/Garcia-Nakata 

3. Public Utilities Commission ("PUC") Funding 

Ms. Manton stated that she will present this item during the next Visual Arts Committee 
meeting. 

4. Transbay Transit Center Public Art Program 

Ms. Manton provided an update on first meeting of the Transbay Art Steering 
Committee, which includes Maria Ayerdi-Kaplan, Executive Director of the Transbay Joint 
Powers Authority ("TJPA"); Fred Clarke, Principal of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects; Luis 
Cancel, Director of Cultural Affairs, San Francisco Arts Commission; Jeannene Przyblyski, 
San Francisco Arts Commissioner; and Blake Summers, Director and Chief Curator, San 
Francisco Airport Museums. She stated that the meeting agenda included establishing art 
program objectives, selecting potential sites and opportunities for Phase I, discussing the 
Arts Master Plan development process, and reviewing the artists selected through an 
invitational call. Ms. Manton explained that the focus during Phase I will include three 
main artworks to be commissioned for the rooftop park, the Grand Concourse, and the 
sculptural light columns. From a review of 32 artists, the following nine were selected for 
interviews: Chakaia Booker, Julie Chang, Jamie Carpenter, Timothy Hawkinson, Jenny 
Holzer, Christian Moeller, Ernesto Neto, Erwin Redl, and Do Ho Suh. Ms. Manton 
explained that the project is currently in design development and construction should 
begin in 2010. She also stated that there will be a Phase II of the project, which will 
include the commissioning of artworks for the underground platforms, passenger lobbies, 
waiting rooms, pedestrian entrances, and other opportunities. 

Mr. Cancel expressed his excitement about the design of the new transit center and the 
impact it will have in the neighborhood. Commissioner Przyblyski stated that Mr. Clarke 
was enthusiastic about the selection of artists and open to considering a variety of 

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approaches to the artwork for the new center. 

5. Lake Merced Temporary Art in Natural Settings 

Ms. Manton introduced artist John Melvin to present a new proposal for the Lake Merced 
Temporary Art in Natural Settings Project, as the previous proposal could not be 
implemented due to engineering constraints. Mr. Melvin stated that the artwork will be 
situated in the North Lake and is based on birds and the themes of identity, ecology, 
urbanization, and place. The proposal consists of a series of open containers, individually 
tethered to anchors on the bottom of the lake, constructed of PVC pipe, and wrapped in 
day-glow orange construction temporary non-biodegradable safety netting. Mr. Melvin 
stated that he will work closely with the Golden Gate Audubon Society ("GGAS") and the 
Natural Areas Program ("NAS"), and coordinate the installation schedule with the Dragon 
Boat Society and neighboring schools like Lowell High School in order to organize 
educational programming. 

In response to questions from Commissioners, Mr. Melvin stated that he would conduct 
tests with the materials and work closely with GGAS in order to ensure that the 
temporary installation will not harm or disturb the nesting patterns of birds. He also 
stated that he would approach construction companies to use recycled materials for his 
project. Commissioner Johnston suggested working with the San Francisco Dump and the 
Department of the Environment to access the recycled materials. Ms. Manton stated that 
the timeframe for the installation could range from one to six months. Mr. Melvin stated 
that the Lake Merced Task Force is supportive and receptive of projects that bring more 
attention to Lake Merced. 

Motion: Motion to approve the preliminary proposal by John Melvin for Lake Merced, 
pending approval from the Public Utilities Commission's Natural Areas Program and the 
Lake Merced Task Force. 
Moved: Johnston, Garcia-Nakata 

6. Moscone Recreation Center 

Ms. Manton introduced artist Kent Roberts to present his artwork proposal for the 
Moscone Recreation Center. Ms. Manton explained that Mr. Roberts was invited to 
redevelop his proposal for the site. Project Manager Regina Almaguer stated that pending 
approval from the Visual Arts Committee regarding the revised proposal, the Arts 
Commission will arrange another community meeting and have the proposal on display 
for public comment. Mr. Roberts presented a model of a stainless steel sculpture in the 
form of a ship with waves made of concrete pavers, located on the grassy area of 
Moscone Recreation Center between Francisco and Bay Streets. Ms. Manton explained 
that this will be the first public art project commissioned by the City in the district. 

In response to questions from Commissioners, Ms. Almaguer stated that the Arts 
Commission has been in contact with the Recreation and Park Department regarding this 
project. Mr. Roberts stated that issues of safety were addressed in the design of the 
sculpture: the spacing between the ribs of the sculpture would not allow people to get 
stuck between the ribs and the lack of horizontal structures would prevent people from 

1/28/2009 2: 19 PM 



sfac: January 2 1 , 2009 http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp7icH} 

scaling the work. Ms. Manton stated this project would require stamped and signed 
drawings from engineers to ensure the stability of its installation. Commissioner 
Przyblyski stated that it was a lovely proposal which takes into account the history of the 
site. Ms. Manton stated that she would show the proposal to Dennis Kern, Director of 
Operations of San Francisco's Recreation and Park Department. 

Motion: Motion to approve the design development of the artwork proposal by Kent 
Roberts for Moscone Recreation Center. 
Moved: Lloyd, Johnston 

7. San Francisco International Airport - Terminal 2 

Susan Pontious presented Norie Sato's design for the glass facade screen of Terminal 
Two at San Francisco International Airport. She stated that the Airport Commission 
passed a resolution that approved the selection of artists for Terminal Two. The artwork 
design consists of digitized images that resemble clouds on laminated glass. The work 
will be fabricated by Franz Meyer Glass of Germany. Ms. Pontious also reported on the 
installation of a new plaque honoring former Airport Commissioner William Coblentz. She 
stated that the Arts Commission has managed the production of two honorary plaques 
for the Airport in the past. 

Motion: Motion to approve the Selection Panel recommendation of Norie Sato's design 
for the glass facade screen for Terminal Two at San Francisco International Airport and to 
authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with the artist for an 
amount not to exceed $1,000,000 to design, fabricate, transport and install the artwork. 
Moved: Garcia-Nakata, Lloyd 

Motion: Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural affairs to enter into an agreement 

not to exceed $20,000 with Daub Firmin Studios to design and fabricate a plaque 

honoring former Airport Commissioner William Coblentz for San Francisco International 

Airport. 

Moved: Johnston, Lloyd 

8. Laguna Honda Hospital 

Ms. Pontious presented the revised designs of the murals by artist Owen Smith for the 
lobby of Laguna Honda Hospital. The original design consisted of images of men working 
on the construction of the Golden Gate Bridge. Ms. Pontious stated that she was 
concerned that there were no images of women in the design and asked the artist to 
revise his design. The proposed revision consists of an image of John Muir walking in the 
woods on the left-side panel, and an image of a farmer's market scene with both men 
and women on the right-side panel; the center panel would remain the same as in the 
original design, with images of men working on the Golden Gate Bridge. Commissioners 
responded that they did not find the revised narrative as compelling as the original and it 
actually seemed more clichA© with the women depicted in the marketplace. 
Commissioners agreed not to approve the revised lobby mural designs and to continue 
the project with the original design. 



4 of 7 1/28/2009 2:19 



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9. San Francisco General Hospital 

Ms. Pontious presented the preferred sites for the relocation of two monumental 
sculptures located at San Francisco General Hospital, due to the construction of the new 
Acute Care Center. The sculptures include Gerald Walburg's Stiff Loops and Beniamino 
Bufano's Madonna. Bufano's sculpture would be relocated to the Comfort Garden located 
South of Building 80 on the San Francisco General Hospital campus. Commissioners 
agreed on the relocation of Bufano's work to the garden. 

Walburg's sculpture is planned for relocation to the South East corner of the San 
Francisco General Hospital campus. Commissioner Przyblyski questioned the 
appropriateness of the proposed site given the monumental size of the sculpture, which 
was estimated to be about thirty feet wide and eight feet high. Ms. Pontious stated that 
open space is very limited in the re-design of the campus, and the sculpture would fit in 
the proposed site and would be angled to coincide with the pathways. Ms. Cummings 
also stated that the sculpture, unlike in its current location, would be visible from the 
street as well as from apartments and residences nearby. 

Commissioner Przyblyski questioned if the sculpture in the proposed location would really 
enhance visitors' experiences at the hospital and asked about other potential sites 
elsewhere in the City. Ms. Pontious responded that they are working on the tight 
timeframe as the sculpture has to be removed from its current site by March 1, 2009, 
and the desire is not to move the sculpture more than once. Commissioners considered 
placing the work along the waterfront, which would consist of coordination with the Port, 
or de-accessioning the sculpture, which would involve storing the piece as well as finding 
a buyer. Ms. Pontious stated that originally the sculpture was intended to be relocated to 
a mini-park on the General Hospital campus, but the park was then changed to a parking 
lot. Given that the other options did not seem feasible within the timeframe, 
Commissioners approved the relocation of Walburg's sculpture to the proposed site on 
the South East corner of the campus. 

Motion: Motion to approve relocation of Gerald Walburg's Stiff Loops (1978.52) to the 
South East corner of the San Francisco General Hospital campus. 
Moved: Garcia-Nakata, Johnston 

Motion: Motion to approve the relocation of Beniamino Bufano's Madonna (1974.21) to 
the garden located South of Building 80 on the San Francisco General Hospital campus. 
Moved: Lloyd, Garcia-Nakata 

10. Art on Market Street Program 

Project Manager Judy Moran requested that this item be postponed to the next Visual 
Arts Committee meeting in February 2009. 

11. Broadway Streetscape 

Project Manager Tonia Macneil presented images of the completed artwork Language of 
the Birds by Brian Goggin with Dorka Keehn and the success of the November 23, 2008 
unveiling ceremony. Director of Cultural Affairs Luis Cancel announced that he completed 

1/28/2009 2:19 PM 



sfac: January 2 1 , 2009 http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=9' 

a segment with Brian Goggin about the new work for the February 2009 Culture Wire 
program. 

Ms. Macneil stated that there was an issue with the legibility of the embedded text as 
the grey of the resin was too similar in value to the grey of the concrete paving. She 
explained that the technique used by the installer to create the text involved a process of 
etching and filling the etched portions with very hard resin. Ms. Macneil stated that she 
believes the error might lie with the contractor the contractor who installed the text or 
with the contractor who poured the concrete, which came out much darker in color than 
the approved mock-up. The artists decided to hand-paint the resin text with a black- 
pigmented lacquer in order to create enough contrast in time for the dedication. A Ms. 
Macneil stated that she is requesting a motion to approve the artwork with the exception 
of the paving text because she wants to submit final payment to the artists. 

When asked by Commissioners what solutions were discussed, Ms. Macneil stated that 
the contractors proposed providing the Arts Commission with enough sealer to protect 
the text over the next 20 years. Collections Manager Allison Cummings stated that she 
has not discussed this particular solution yet with the contractors and is not sure what 
other solutions may exist. Commissioners stated that they would not approve the motion 
to accept the completion of the artwork because it would release the artists from their 
responsibility to work with the Arts Commission and the contractor in coming up with a 
solution to the problem. Commissioner Przyblyski stated that the paving is located in a 
high traffic area and encourages graffiti, which is a form of public writing, and is 
consistent with the values of the Beat Culture. Ms. Pontious also stated that a supply of 
sealer would not be adequate as there will be additional costs, including the labor for 
applying the sealer. Commissioners agreed to postpone the approval of the completed 
artwork and its subsequent acceptance into the Civic Art Collection pending resolution of 
the text and paving issue. 

12. New Business 

There was no new business to report. 

13. Old Business 

There was no old business to report. 

14. Adjournment 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:41 pm. 

MC 1/28/2009 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts 

Commission office, 25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during 

regular business hours. INFO: Mary Chou (415) 252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of 

the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic 

6 of 7 1/28/2009 2:1*5 



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devices are prohibited at this meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the 
removal from the meeting of any person(s) responsible for the ringing or use of a cell 
phone, pager, or other similar sound-producing electronic devices. 
Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or 
administrative action may be required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San 
Francisco Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register 
and report lobbying activity. For more information about the Lobbyist Ordinance, please 
contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San Francisco, CA 94102 - 
telephone (415) 252-3100, fax (415) 252-3112 and http://www.sfqov.org/ethics . 
KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. 
Commissions, boards, councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct 
the people's business. This ordinance assures that deliberations are conducted before the 
people and that City operations are open to the people's review. For more information on 
your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report a violation of the ordinance, 
contact Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine Ordinance Task 
Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by 
phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by email at sotf(g)sfg ov.org . 



1/28/2009 2: 19 PM 



STAFF REPORT 

DATE: January 21, 2009 

TO: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Susan Pontious 

RE: San Francisco International Airport - New Plaque 

Please see the attached letter from the San Francisco International Airport. 



SFO 



/ 



'^lyU^U 



-v-x. 




San Francisco International Airport 



December 3, 2008 



P.O. Box 8097 

San Francisco, CA 94128 

Tel 650.821.6700 

Fax 650.821.6777 

www.sfoArts.org 



Mr. Luis R. Cancel 
Director of Cultural Affairs 
San Francisco Arts Commission 
25 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco, CA 94102 

Dear Luis, 

The Airport Commission is in the process of renovating Terminal 2, and we are naming 
the concourse in honor of past Airport Commissioner Bill Coblentz. Commemorating 
past commissioners within the terminals has involved producing plaques on designated 
wall spaces. 

It would be very much appreciated if the Arts Commission would assist in the 
production of a plaque honoring Commissioner Coblentz by contracting the services of 
the Daub & Firmin Studios. This particular studio produced plaques for two of our 
former Airport Commission Presidents, and it seems fitting to contract that studio's 
services once again to remain consistent. The Airport Commission would work order 
funds to the Arts Commission to handle the costs of the plaque's production. 

As always, your consideration of this request would be very much appreciated. Please 
feel free to contact me if you have any concerns. 

1 thank you for your assistance and wish you and your staff the best in 2009. 

Very truly yours, 



John L. Martin 
Airport Director 




it'll Fl'.U KM 
Airport Wli.'-fcu-r 




cc: Blake Summers, SF Airport Museums 

Susan Pontious, Curator, SF Arts Commission 



STAFF REPORT 

DATE: January 21, 2009 

TO: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Judy Moran 

RE: Art on Market Street Program update 



Art on Market Street 2008 Program summary 

Golden Gate Comics, the current Art on Market Street Kiosk Poster Project, is the last in the 
2008 series of three poster projects, all with a narrative theme. Below is a brief description of 
the projects. 

• The first project in the series, Dashiell Hammett 's San Francisco, by Owen Smith, 
focused on Hammett's novel, The Maltese Falcon, and included a walking tour of sites 
associated with the novel led by Don Herron, who has conducted Hammett tours in San 
Francisco for over 30 years. One of the paintings that Smith created for the project, 
Brigid, has won two awards: a Silver Medal from the publication Creative Quarterly, 
with the painting appearing in the upcoming Issue 14. The painting was also selected for 
Illustrators 51, a book and gallery exhibition at the Society of Illustrators of New York. 
The Arts Commission will receive credit for this project in both publications. 

• The second project, Flor de Manila y San Francisco, by artist Jenifer Wofford, illustrated 
the story of Flor Villanueva, a nurse who emigrates from the Philippines to San Francisco 
in 1973. The project included a panel discussion at the Kearny Street Workshop with 
three distinguished experts on Filipino immigration issues, and the history of the Filipino 
community in San Francisco and the nursing profession which is so prevalent in that 
community here and internationally . Artweek included a review of the posters in its 
December 2008/January 2009 issue. 

• For the third and current project, Golden Gate Comics, the artists Briana Miller and Thien 
Pham, created a comic book with a superhero, a sweet romance, and an encounter with 
dastardly villains. As part of the project, the Arts Commission is collaborating with the 

th 

Cartoon Art Museum to present a hands-on comic book workshop on January 25 at the 
Museum. The project was featured in the December 21 st SF Chronicle's Pink Section's 
This Week's pick for Monday 22nd, and the Chronicle's 96 Hours section will include a 
feature on the project and the artists in the January 22 nd issue. 

A catalog for the 2008 Art on Market Street series will include images of the six original posters 
in each of the three series, with a brief essay about each project. 



Art on Market Street Program 2009 Program plans 

The theme for the 2009 Program is photographically-based art projects that are developed from 
photographs rather than incorporating them directly into the images. The imagery may be hand 
drawn or created digitally, among other techniques. 

Two proposals will be presented at the Visual Arts Committee meeting for this series from artists 
Kota Ezawa and Colter Jacobsen, both of whom the VAC has previously approved to prepare 
proposals. Both artists' have worked with photographically-based imagery. 

• Kota Ezawa creates still images and animated films based on photographs translated into 
flat color compositions through manual tracings of the source material. He has received 
wide acclaim for his animated film based on a segment of the videotapes of the O.J. 
Simpson trial. Kota Ezawa' s written proposal is attached. A proposal image for one of the 
posters will be presented at the VAC meeting. 

• Colter Jacobsen' s artworks are hand-rendered drawings from found photographs, often 
snapshots, that may be single, composite, or collaged images. Colter Jacobsen's proposal 
will be presented at the VAC meeting. 

Art on Market Street 2010 Program 

I am exploring possible themes for the 2010 Program and would appreciate any suggestions from 
VAC members for themes as well as artists. A Call for Artists for the 2010 Program will be 
posted in February of this year. 



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oceanic cartography, without knowledge 

of the artist's work, Colbum's process of 

removal is evident and intriguing. FOR 

THE DEEP is less specifically map-based 

than some of her previous work, such as 

Just Below (2005) at Yerba Buena Center 

for the Arts, which showed die networks 

of sewers, water pipes and creeks run- , 

ning below the surface of the city. 

The sunny and warm KaJa studio 
appears to be a lovely place to work and '. 

viewing the exhibition on a Saturday 
afternoon — while artists and staff flipped 
through magazines, made tea and fiddled 
with paper — was an inspired way to look 
at art. Kudos to Kala for exhibiting art 
within the context of a residency, rather 
than divorcing the work from its process. 

— Cassie Riger 

Residency Projects Part 4 closed 
November 22 at Kala Art Institute, Berkeley. 

Cassie Riger is freelance writer based in 
San Francisco 



Jenifer K. Wofford on 
Market Street kiosks 

Since 1992, the San 
Francisco Arts 
Commission has been 
inviting artists to produce 
a series of large posters 
that are installed along 
the advertising kiosks of 
Market Street. As a pub- 
lic art project, the series avoids static 
sculptures or installations in favor of a 
rotating engagement with the histories of 
downtown San Francisco, provocatively 
nestled within the increasingly con- 
sumer-focused streetscape of advertising 
and sales announcements. 

For the latest installment of the pro- 
ject, Jenifer K. Wofford has created large 
storyboard posters that narrate the story 
of her fictional character, Flor 
Villanueva, as she immigrates and adapts 
to San Francisco during the 1970s. 
Moving up and down Market Street, one 
can traverse a land of dispersed gallery of 
episodes in the life of Flor. The narra- 
tive, broken into six yearlong "chapters," 
follows Flor from her home in Manila to 
San Francisco, negotiating the immi- 
grant experience, and the relationship 
between setting down new roots and 
remaining tethered to family and home. 
Throughout, Wofford shows how Flor's 
experience takes place within a larger 
context of world events, including 
charged episodes in the local histories of 
both Manila and San Francisco. How 
Flor narrates these relations becomes as 
much a part of the story as any individual 
plot element, and we come to understand 
how the diasporic condition is not just 
one of migration and integration, but of 




Jenifer Wofford, Flor 1973 Skyiab, poster reproduction, 
67" x 46", at San Francisco Arts Commission's Art on 
Market Street 



tional, and how one relates the experi- 
ence of these negotiations. 

Each poster features a handful of 
images, along with a simple caption that 
might push the story forward or suggest 
certain historical background events that, 
in many ways, "teach" Flor (and us) as 
much about America as do her daily 
encounters with work and local culture. 
Additionally, important events in Filipino 
and Filipino-American history appear, 
like martial law in Manila, or the famous 
I-Hotel battle, where the modern ten- 
ants-rights movement began with the 
defense of a SRO hotel for elderly 
Filipino-American maritime workers in 
San Francisco's Manilatown. Mixing 
Tagalog with English, Flor voices her 
own version of these events, just as 
Wofford subtly uses background and 
color to evoke the immigrant experience 
of 1970s San Francisco without suc- 
cumbing to cliche tropes of the "coming- 
of-age" story. While clearly drawing on 
the tradition of pedagogical comics (we 
learn about '70s Filipino politics, dias- 
poric economies and culture, etc.), these 
don't feel didactic or moralistic, and 
instead capture one character's experi- 
ence of San Francisco during the second 
big wave of Asian -American immigra- 
tion. "I feel like a real San Franciscan 
now, but I'm still 100% Manila," Flor 
says at the end of her six-year journey, 
and we can see how the two identifica- 
tions could find an organic, if uneasy, 
resolution in Flor's experience of her 
world. 

The posters mix elements of comic 
books and graphic novels, such as 
Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, children's 
educational posters and the light box 
work of artists like Jeff Wall or Kota 
Ezawa, using the advertising kiosks' 
nighttime lighting to great effect (at 



unique without drawing attention 
to their manipulation; each 
episode has its own palette and 
feel. Playful yet serious, Wofford 
strikes an effective balance 
throughout Flor's "Six Years." 

Depending on how one tra- 
verses Market Street, there is no 
guarantee that viewers will read 
the story in chronological order. 
As such, each poster can stand 
alone as a discrete work, while 
also suggesting narrative continu- 
ity and history, like an episode or 
chapter in a memoir. Whether or 
not pedestrians will be pulled into 
Flor's story such that they will 
search out additional chapters is 
an open question, which is of 
course a challenge for any of the 
Art on Market Street projects: 
how to make stand-alone works 
that still address local histories 
and movement along the down- 
town avenue. Wofford's Flor, in 
this way, invites us along on a 
walking tour of her story, as if a 
comic book were published on site rather 
than stapled together into a portable 
object. 

— David Buuck 



Jenifer K. Wofford: Flor de Manila y San 
Francisco, a project of the San Francisco Arts 
Commission's Art on Market Street will be on 
view through December 1 9 on the pedestrian 
side of the triangular kiosks on both sides of 
Market Street, between Van Ness and the 
Embarcadero, San Francisco. 

David Buuck is a contributing editor to 
Artweek 



'Double Exposure: 
African Americans 
Before and Behind the 
Camera 1 at MOAD 

he exhibition 
Double Exposure: 
African 

Americans Before 
and Behind the 
Camera, orga- 
nized by the 
Amistad Center 
for Art & Culture and presented at the 
Museum of the African Diaspora in San 
Francisco, takes photography of and by 
African Americans as its starting point. 
Deliberately loose, this framework could 
include any number of objects and cura- 
tors. Lisa Henry and W Frank Mitchell 
work within these parameters to intro- 
duce several themes, and to show the 
work of emerging and well-known con- 
temporary artists as well as historic works 
culled from the Amistad Center's nine- 




Poster Mashups 

A proposal for the Art on Market Street Kiosk Poster Series 
By Kota Ezawa 



For the Art on Market Street Kiosk Poster Series I would like to produce a series of 
drawings based on poster advertisements that are (or were) on display in the Market 
Street Kiosks. Each drawing combines the image content of one advertisement with the 
text slogan of another. Rather than adding to the surplus of visual information that 
confronts pedestrians on Market Street, this project attempts to reduce and recycle what is 
already there and to offer a look at advertising imagery and language detached from its 
original purpose. 

The title of the project pays homage to a genre of music called Mashup, in which samples 
of more than one song are combined in a new composition. Like the music compositions, 
Poster Mashups brings together disparate elements to create an alternative experience to 
the one provided by the source material. By returning the borrowed advertising image 
and text slogan to its origin (the Market Street Kiosk) in an altered form Poster Mashups 
causes a feedback loop in which output and input interact with each other. The purpose of 
this poster series is not to mock or make fun of advertising, but to transform the activity 
of looking at poster ads into an encounter with art. 

For the past seven years I have created animated films, lightbox displays, prints and other 
types of media in which moving and still photographic images have been translated into 
flat color compositions through manual tracings of photographic source material. The 
sources for these projects have ranged from TV news footage to Hollywood films and 
from historic photographs to amateur snap shots. My projects have been shown as gallery 
installations and in cinema screenings. Poster Mashups is an extension of this larger 
project, addressing advertising culture as a subject and using an outdoor public space as a 
venue. 



STAFF REPORT 



DATE: 
TO: 
FROM: 
RE: 



January 21, 2009 

Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 
Tonia Macneil 
Broadway Streetscape 



Project: Language of the Birds 

Artist: Brian Goggin with Dorka Keehn 

Budget: $35,000 Art Enrichment funds, $83,000 private donations, $125,000 DPW 

construction funds, plus substantial volunteer support. 
RE: Request for limited approval of the artwork. 

Brian Goggin' s Language of the Birds was unveiled to great fanfare on Sunday, November 23, 
2008. The installation was completed on Friday, November 21. The artwork has been completed 
as specified with the exception of the text embedded in the Broadway plaza sidewalk. This 
aspect of the artists' design was performed by the DPW subcontractor. The text as installed 
deviates from the approved mockup in that it is not permanent, as it would have been if 
fabricated in accordance with the pavement text specifications. In addition, the plaza paving has 
already been patched with a different color of concrete from the original. Therefore we are 
requesting limited approval of the artwork until these issues can be resolved. 

A meeting to attempt to resolve these outstanding issues will take place on Friday, January 16. 
The results of that meeting will be reported at the Visual Arts Committee meeting. 



John K. Melvin 

SF Arts Commission - Temporary Projects in Natural Settings 

Project Proposal for Lake Merced Installation 

House Boats for Birds 

Rev. 12.04.08 



Proposed Site: 

Northwest Corner of North Lake - Lake Merced 

San Francisco is considered to be a socially conscious city grappling with the implications of gentrification. At the 
city's edge lies Lake Merced; the lake's history and even location are unfamiliar to SF natives. This natural lake is 
bounded by urban development on nearly every edge. Within its environs, human intervention fluctuates 
between recreation and preservation, at times with no clear distinction. The varied sociology, climatology, and 
ecology of Lake Merced are key actors in my conceptual exploration. Furthermore, the subject of ecology, 
subsequent efforts of categorization, classification, and definition by our culture figures strongly in the context of 
Lake Merced. 

Lake Merced's sensitive ecology has been a subject for the better part of a hundred years in respect to San 
Francisco's history. The lake's ecology has gone from neglected to protected and back again, with at times 
catastrophic consequences. Not only is this project a public art project, it is also a temporary project in natural 
settings; thus, it is hoped that this project, throughout its development, has remained sensitive to the lake's 
ecology. 

This project has spanned a year in development and seeks to profit from associations both professional and 
community that have been gained during that process. A large majority of those discussions noted in the official 
minutes of several meetings frame the following proposal. 

Project Summary: 

An Installation consisting of approximately 20 to 30 rectangular open containers each 35' wide by 48' long and 4' 
tall will float on the lake's surface in a grid like pattern. The containers will be individually tethered to anchors on 
the bottom of the lake, will be constructed of PVC pipe, and wrapped in day-glow orange construction temporary 
non-biodegradable safety netting. The tethering will allow each individual container to move in response to wind 
and surface fluctuations at the site. Given past experience with previous proposals at Lake Merced, the ideal site 
will again most likely be the northwest corner of the lake; however the project's exact location within this site is 
subject to collaborative discussions with government and community agencies not limited to but focused on the 
Natural Areas Program and Golden Gate Audubon Society. 

Concept: 

Drawing boundaries or highlighting areas speaks to the act of containment which in itself speaks to categorization 
and classification. By distinguishing non-sites within the lake it is hoped that formally the site of the lake at large 
will be called into question. Conceptually the containers will be city nesting projects for birds under attack by feral 
cats. Whether or not these containers are used by the birds is beside the point, rather what is at issue here is the 
role that humans want to play in a post climate change aware society. Population trends in human species put 
pressure on development and as the fencing material is common to urban construction projects the connection 
should be accessible. Continuing with the commentary on development, the containers will be laid out as if there 
were a housing development project on a neatly contained, uniform grid. 

Project Duration: 

Given the expected low impact of this project, actual duration is subject to continued collaborative discussion. At 
this point, it is proposed that exhibition duration be one month or two months, preferably during a time when 



John K. Melvin 

SF Arts Commission - Temporary Projects in Natural Settings 

Project Proposal for Lake Merced Installation 

House Boats for Birds 

Rev. 12.04.08 

school is in session to facilitate public symposiums. The low-tech aspects of the project give it a fabrication 
advantage and the project could be installed as early as this coming spring. 

Observation & Reclamation: 

The individual containers function like dirigibles and can easily be floated to a nearby boat ramp for easy removal. 
As with other works sited in the environment a system of constant surveillance will be a component of future 
detailed proposals. 

Sculptural Details: 

The PVC pipe will form the principle structure to which the fencing is attached. PVC pipe has a precedent of being 
used in potable water applications and all solvents, glues, or otherwise will be the same as is used in the plumbing 
industry thereby posing no foreseeable threat to the environment. The ultimate gauge of the pipe will be 
dependent on field tests for buoyancy but should not need to exceed 8 inch interior diameter. Should cabling be 
required for stability in the corners of the container it will be of a marine grade from a supplier with established 
history of marine applications. 

Each container will be tethered by marine grade cable or rope depending on engineering that is then attached to a 
suitable anchor. Clearly turbidity is an issue given the Lake's ecology and an appropriate anchor will be 
researched for application. Length of the tether will be dependent on wind pattern analysis; once done, this data 
will be specified to the commission. 

Logistics of Installation: 

Details to be provided after initial approval from commission. Suffice it to say that a small install crew with boats 
will place anchors with tether lines for attachment to individual containers. The crew will require use of the boat 
ramp typically utilized by the Dragon Boats. The containers are expected to relatively quick to fabricate and can 
be assembled on the shore perhaps in the large grass field at the south end of North Lake. From here the small 
crew can carry the containers down the ramp to be floated to the specific attachment point. 



c: February 18, 2009 http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfacj3age.asp7icH98854 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

LISTEN 

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A 

February 18,2009 RCV[ 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, February 18, 2009 

l 7o . ir 3:0 °P m - GOVERNMENT 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 DOCUMENTS DEPT 

l/ '*/°1 Agenda FEB 1 8 2009 

SAN FRANCISCO 

1. Consent Calendar PUBLIC LIBRARY 

1 . Motion to approve the following individuals as candidates for the Central Subway Chinatown Station Artist 
Selection Panel: Mona Tamari, Central Subway Architect, KwanHenmi; Luis Zurinaga, Consultant, San 
Francisco County Transportation Authority; Suzette Min, faculty, University of California, Davis; Hung Liu, 
artist, faculty, Mills College; Tan Chow, Senior Community Organizer, Chinatown Community Development 
Center; Hou Hanru, Director, SFAI Gallery; Abby Chen, Curator, Chinese Culture Center; Jay Xu, Director, 
Asian Art Museum; Jean Ma, faculty, Stanford University; Sue Lee, Executive Director, Chinese Historical 
Society of America; Judy Hu, Communications Manager, Chinese Historical Society of America; Kota Ezawa, 
artist, faculty, California College of the Arts ("CCA"); Rene de Guzman, Visual Art Director, Oakland Museum 
of California; Mark Johnson, Director, Gallery, San Francisco State University. 

2. Motion to approve the following individuals as candidates for the Central Subway Union Square/Market Street 
Station Artist Selection Panel: Mona Tamari, Central Subway Architect, Kwan Henmi; Luis Zurinaga, Consultant, 
San Francisco County Transportation Authority; Lawrence Rinder, Executive Director, Berkeley Art Museum; 
Margie Driscoll, Executive Director, American Institute of Architects; Jens Hoffman, Director, Wattis Gallery, 
CCA; Ellen Newman, Board Member, Union Square Association; Barbara Goldstein, Director, San Jose Public 
Art Program; Ellen Oh, Executive Director, Kearny Street Workshop; Amy Trachtenberg, artist; Kota Ezawa, 
artist, faculty, CCA; Stephanie Syjuco, artist; and Renee Green, artist, Dean of Graduate Studies, San Francisco 
Art Institute ("SFAI"). 

3. Motion to approve the following individuals as candidates for the Central Subway Moscone Station Artist 
Selection Panel: Mona Tamari, Central Subway Architect, Kwan Henmi; Luis Zurinaga, Consultant, San 
Francisco County Transportation Authority; Gary Garrels, Chief Curator, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art 
("SFMoMA"); Julie Bishop, Associate Curator, SFMoMA; Betti-Sue Hertz, Visual Arts Curator, Yerba Buena 
Center for the Arts ("YBCA"); Charles Ward, Development Director, YBCA; Shiree Dyson, Director of Public 
Programs, Museum of the African Diaspora; Alleluia Panis, Executive Director, Kularts; Fred Wasserman, 
Deputy Director of Programs, Contemporary Jewish Museum; Jens Hoffman, Director, Wattis Gallery, CCA; 
Rene de Guzman, Visual Art Curator, Oakland Museum of California; Hou Hanru, Director, Gallery, SFAI. 



2/17/2009 3:00 PM 



sfac: February 18, 2009 http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=98 

4. Motion to approve a mural by lead artist Josef Norris covering a retaining wall on Fell Street between Pierce 
and Steiner Streets in collaboration with Kids Serve Youth Murals and youth from Ida B. Wells High School. The 
mural will consist of mosaic tile birds created by high school students. 

5. Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to take action, without a resolution of the full Commission, 
on the following items: Approve contracts or purchase orders with conservators, art technicians, or other 
qualified contractors for the purposes of performing conservation, maintenance and repair on works of art in the 
City's collection; and approve contracts with art service providers for the transport, installation and storage of 
artwork. 

2. Community Arts and Education Program Poster 

Janet Heller 
Staff Report 

Presentation of a project of the Community Arts and Education program of poster designs submitted by 
WritersCorps for display in kiosks on Market Street. 

Motion: Motion to approve a project of the Community Arts and Education Program for an exhibition in kiosks 
on Market Street of posters submitted by WritersCorps in March, 2009. 

3. Patricia's Green Temporary Sculpture 

Jill Manton 

Presentation of a temporary sculpture proposal to be placed in Patricia's Green by Mark Baugh Sasaki during the 

time period of July 1, 2009 to January 1, 2009, sponsored by the Hayes Valley Art Coalition. 

Motion: Motion to approve the temporary installation of artwork by Mark Baugh Sasaki in Patricia's Green 
pending final permit approval from the Recreation and Park Department. 

4. Broadway Streetscape 

Tonia Macneil, Allison Cummings 

Report on completion of artwork Language of the Birds by Brian Goggin and Dorka Keehn. 

Motion: Motion to approve and accept "Language of the Birds," 2005, an installation made of concrete paves, 
UV rated Polycarbonate, silicon, stainless steel wire, LED lights, custom circuit boards, electronic light dimmer, 
electronic controller, and program card, by Brian Goggin and Dorka Keehn at the intersection of Broadway and 
Columbus Avenues in San Francisco, into the Civic Art Collection. 

5. Art on Market Street Program 

Judy Moran 

Presentation of Kota Ezawa's Art on Market Street Program proposal for 2009/1 0. 

Motion: Motion to approve the proposal by artist Kota Ezawa for an Art on Market Street Kiosk Poster Project 
for the Art on Market Street 2009/10 Program, and to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to enter into 
contract with Kota Ezawa for the design and printing of 4 copies each of 6 original poster designs and a related 
public event for an amount not to exceed $ 1 7,000. 



2 of 4 2/17/2009 3:001 



c: February 18,2009 http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp7icH98854 

6. New Public Art Projects 

Tonia Macneil, Jennifer Lovvorn 
Staff Report 

Report on new 2009 Bay Area Registry; request names of potential applicants for 2009 Bay Area Artist Registry; 
and request recommendations for people to serve on selection panels for new public art projects. 

7. North Beach Branch Library 

Jennifer Lovvorn 
Staff Report 

Report on new public art opportunity at the North Beach Branch Library. 

8. City Hall Commemorative Bust Guidelines 

Jill Manton 

Report on comments and recommendations from the City Hall Preservation Advisory Commission regarding the 

draft of the City Hall Commemorative Bust Guidelines. 

9. Jay DeFeo Painting 

Jill Manton 

Discussion about possible options for the future placement of the Jay DeFeo painting Masquerade in Black. 

10. Promenade Ribbon Sculpture 

Jill Manton 

Report on proposal to modify the Promenade Ribbon Sculpture. 

1 1 . Civic Center Plaza - Temporary Sculpture 

Jill Manton 

Report on progress of installation by Patrick Dougherty and related scheduled activities. 

12. Public Utilities Commission ("PUC") Funding 

Jill Manton 

Report on current expenditures associated with the PUC reserve. 

13. New Business 

Embarcadero Temporary Sculpture Display 

Jill Manton 

Discussion regarding possible options for Embarcadero Temporary Sculpture Display. 

14. Old Business 

15. Adjournment 

MC 2/13/2009 



■ 



2/17/2009 3:00 PM 



sfac: February 18,2009 http://www. sfgov.org/site/sfacjpage.asp ?id=9& 

Notices 

Explanatory documents are available for public inspection and copying at the Arts Commission office, 25 Van 
Ness Avenue, Suite 240, San Francisco, CA 94102 during regular business hours. INFO: Mary Chou (415) 
252-3215. 

Public comment in regard to specific items will be taken before or during consideration of the item. 

The ringing of and use of cell phones, pagers and similar sound-producing electronic devices are prohibited at this 
meeting. Please be advised that the Chair may order the removal from the meeting of any person(s) responsible 
for the ringing or use of a cell phone, pager, or other similar sound-producing electronic devices. 

Individuals and entities that influence or attempt to influence local legislative or administrative action may be 
required by the San Francisco Lobbyist Ordinance (San Francisco Campaign and Governmental Conduct Code 
sections 2.100 - 2.160) to register and report lobbying activity. For more information about the Lobbyist 
Ordinance, please contact the Ethics Commission at 25 Van Ness, Suite 220, San Francisco, CA 94102 - 
telephone (4 1 5) 252-3 1 00, fax (4 1 5) 252-3 1 1 2 and http://www.sfeov.org/ethics . 

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER THE SUNSHINE ORDINANCE 

Government's duty is to serve the public, reaching its decision in full view of the public. Commissions, boards, 
councils and other agencies of the City and County exist to conduct the people's business. This ordinance assures 
that deliberations are conducted before the people and that City operations are open to the people's review. For 
more information on your rights under the Sunshine Ordinance or to report a violation of the ordinance, contact 
Frank Darby, Jr. by mail to Interim Administrator, Sunshine Ordinance Task Force, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett 
Place, Room 244, San Francisco CA 94102-4689; by phone at 415 554 7724; by fax at 415 554 7854; or by 
email at sotf@sfgov.org . 



4 of 4 2/17/2009 3:00 



STAFF REPORT 

DATE: January 21, 2009 

TO: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Janet Heller 

RE: Community Arts and Education Program Poster 



The following six images are the poster designs proposed by WritersCorps for display in kiosks on 
Market Street in March, 2009. 



i«# w la#%%^C %j#%LLEL# wr\9 E 1 Hi 





Celebrating 1$ Years 



ANNIE YU 



Age 1 8, San Francisco Public Library (Main Branch) 



Praise my window bringing in morning light 

And the click of the door when I open it 

Praise my soft pillow 

The radio with its chime of voices to help me wake up 

Praise the cup of tea 

The warmth heating the palms of my hands 



Is 


F| 


A 


c 1 



The artwork was created for This Place Called Poetry, a multimedia project led by 
filmmaker Katharine Gin and sound artist Kjell Nordeson. 

WritersCorps is a project of the San Francisco Arts Commission. Community Arts and 
Education on Market Street is funded by the San Francisco Arts Commission and the 
San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. 

www.sfartscommission.org/WC/ 



SmAmcfea PuUk lihmn 



THIS PLACE CALLED POETRY 




God has given me the greatest gift 
To be able to hold a breath . . . 

And let go right when I want to 
Roll off my tongue and salute 
This year's version of last year's rehearsing 
Not worrying about it not being good enough 
When this poem is done 
I will see a way to read it dif-front 
Some will love the changes 

Some won't even tell the dif-frunce 



WritersQoxys 

Celebrating lfy Years 



ANTONIO 
CACERES 



Age 1 9, WritersCorps Apprentice Program 





The artwork was created for This Place Called Paehy, a multimedio project led by 
filmmaker Katharine Gin and sound artist Kjell Nordeson. 

WrifersCorps is a project of the San Francisco Arts Commission. Community Arts and 
Education on Market Street is funded by the San Francisco Arts Commission and the 
Son Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. 

www.sfartscommission.org/WC/ 



nr* 



THIS PLACE CALLED POETRY 



Most people speak love but don't 

Live love and love for each 

Other will take the shackles off 

Our feet 

Now ask yourself 

Are you 

Free? M\ 



ERIC 

E/\CTED 



Age 18, Ida B. Wells High School 




Wfc^mCorps 

Celebrating 1$ Years 




s 


F 


A 


C 



The artwork was created for This Place Colled Poetry, a multimedia project led by 
filmmaker Katharine Gin and sound artist Kjell Nordeson. 

WritersCorps is a project of the San Francisco Arts Commission. Community Arts and 
Education on Market Street is funded by the San Francisco Arts Commission and the 
Sun Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. 

www.sfartscommission.org/WC/ 



mii Pnbln tJbmn 



THIS PLACE CALLED POETRY 

SHAHID 
MINAPARA 

Age 1 6, Mercy Housing California 




WritersCows 

Celebrating 1$ Years 




s 


F 


A 


cl 



In the blink of an eye 
wingless birds overpower the skies, 
beautiful combinations of colors 
arise in the thousands of kites 
that soar the low heaven. 



The artwork was created for This Place Called Poetry, a multimedia project led by 
filmmaker Katharine Gin and sound artist Kjell Nordeson. 

WritersCorps is a pro|ect of the San Francisco Arts Commission. Community Arts and 
Education on Market Street is funded by the San Francisco Arts Commission and the 
San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. 

www.sfarlscommission.org/WC/ 



Sun Ymm ist a hibln j 



THIS PLACE CALLED POETRY 



PU 





Aqe 1 9, Wri tef sCorps Apprentice Proqrai 





Celebrating 1$ Years 



Amiga, 

se que nuestras vidas tienen 

mucho en comun, 

dolor, agonia, tristeza, 

esperanza y suenos 



as created far This Ploce Called Poetry, a multimedia project led by 
"?irt and sound artist Kjeil Nordeson. 

t of the San Francisco Arts Commission. Community Arts and 

vi. eel ts funded by the San Francisco Arts Commission and the 
> Municipal Transportation Agency. 



THIS PLACE CALLED POETRY 



WmJr\ 1 CElMl 1 9IlflwPI 
Age 1 7, Center for Young Women's Developmenf 




WW/mCorps 

Celebrating 1$ Years 




I am struggling, 

hungry at times 

striving for my own space. 
I am a winner who continues to lose. 




The artwork was created for This Place Called Poetry, a multimedia project led by 
filmmaker Katharine Gin and sound artist Kjell Nordeson, 

WritersCorps is a project of the San Francisco Arts Commission. Community Art3 and 
Education on Market Street is funded by the San f rancisco Arts Commission and the 
San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. 

www.sfartscommission.ora/WC/ 



STAFF REPORT 

DATE: January 21, 2009 

TO: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Tonia Macneil, Jennifer Loworn 

RE: New Public Art Projects and Artist Selection panels 



More than a dozen new public art projects are in the pipeline for 2009 and 2010. In order to streamline 
the recruitment process, staff has issued an RFQ for the 2009 Bay Area Artist Registry. The registry 
is open to professional artists in the nine Bay Area counties. We are conducting in-depth outreach in 
the next two months in order to obtain a strong applicant registry of experienced candidates working in 
a broad range of media and approaches. We welcome your suggestions for applicants for the registry. 
The application deadline is March 23, 2009. Artists must submit their application by that date to be 
considered for 2009 public art commissions. 

Commission membership needed on Selection Panels 

Three selection panels have been scheduled for this Spring, as the construction projects are already in 
the final design and bidding stages. The projects are briefly described below, to refresh your 
memories. The panel dates are already scheduled in order to assure availability of Suite 70. We are 
requesting Commission participation on these panels. 

Panel dates: 

Chinatown Recreation Center 

Selection panel dates: Screening: Monday, April 13 

Artist Selection: Thursday, May 28 
Leland Avenue Streetscape 
Selection panel dates: Screening: Tuesday, April 28 

Artist Selection: Friday, June 12 
Valencia Streetscape 
Selection panel dates: Screening: Tuesday, May 5 

Artist Selection: Tuesday, June 1 6 







Chinese Recreation Center 

Budget: Main facade: Up to $185,000 

Children's playground: $35,000 

Timeline: Artist Selection: June, 2009 
Installation: 2011 




The Recreation and Park Department will replace the Chinese Recreation Center, located at 
the corner of Washington and Mason Streets in San Francisco's Chinatown. The elegant 
new building and grounds offer opportunities for two artworks, one integrated into the 
building's facade, and a second artwork to be incorporated into the design of the children's 
play area. 

Leland Avenue Streetscape 

Budget: Up to $38,000 
Schedule: Artist Selection - July, 2009 
Installation - Summer, 2010 

The Department of Public Works will undertake major 
~ h improvements to the Leland Avenue shopping corridor in the 

Visitacion Valley neighborhood. The streetscape improvements 
include sidewalk widening, seating and landscaped areas, a 
modified roadway to slow traffic, pedestrian lighting, street trees, 
and integral color paving. The neighborhood is home to the 
Visitacion Valley Greenway, a series of linked parks ascending 
the hillside from Leland Avenue, with fanciful gates and tile seat 
walls designed and executed by local artists. The artwork will be 
located on the sidewalk at the southwest corner of the intersection of Leland Avenue and 
Bayshore Boulevard. In addition to its conceptual and aesthetic qualities, the artwork might 
also serve a functional purpose, incorporating pedestrian lighting, providing shelter, telling 
time or indicating the force and direction of the wind. Footings for artwork have been 
included in the construction plans, with locations to be determined in the field. 

Valencia Street 

Budget: Up to $52,000 

Schedule: Artist Selection - July, 2009 

Installation - Spring, 2010 
Streetscape improvements to Valencia Street will span the 
blocks from 16 th Street to 19 th Street. . Valencia Street is 
one of the City's main bicycle routes, and the 
improvements will focus on serving that community. 

Artwork for Valencia Street will be elevated on poles 
provided by DPW adjacent to bicycle "oases" of multiple 
racks at six locations along the street. The artwork should 
incorporate solar-powered light, although it need not 
function as pedestrian lighting. 




'■ ( '^^v :i '* ! ' 1 



STAFF REPORT 

DATE: January 21, 2009 

TO: Honorable Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Jennifer Lovvorn 



RE: 



North Beach Branch Library 



NORTH BEACH BRANCH LIBRARY ART ENRICHMENT 
PROJECT OUTLINE 




VIEW SOUTH UP COLUMBUS AVENUE 



NORTH BEACH BRANCH PUBLIC LIBRARY 

BACKGROUND 

As part of the Branch Library Improvement Program, a new replacement North Beach Branch 
Library will be constructed at Joe Dimaggio Playground, which is bound by Columbus Avenue, and 
Lombard, Powell and Greenwich Streets. The Library and the Recreation & Parks Department 
conducted a Master Planning process for the Joe Dimaggio Playground to determine the location 
within the park for the new larger library- The proposed site is the triangular lot between Lombard 
and Mason Streets and Columbus Avenue. The new North Beach Branch and will be approximately 
8,500 square feet with designated areas for teens, adults, and children and will include an 
upstairs program room. The new building will have a triangular footprint with entrances on 
Columbus Avenue and Mason Street. The building is being designed to meet LEED Silver 
standards and will maximize the use of natural light. 

ART OPPORTUNITIES 

There are two opportunities for art enrichment at the North Beach Branch Library: 






1. The design of the new building includes double high ceilings in the Adult Room and 
Children's Room. These rooms feature floor to ceiling windows located at the two corners 
of the building along Columbus Avenue. These "lanterns" offer an opportunity for 
suspended sculpture which would be highly visible by day and night from both the 
building's exterior and interior. 

2. The design of the new building includes entrances on Columbus Avenue and Mason 
Street/Mason Park. Above the Mason entrance there is a protruding bay window and 
above the Columbus Avenue entrance is a recessed area. These companion areas offer an 
opportunity for art enrichment. These sites would be visible by day and night from the 
library's exterior along Columbus Avenue and from Joe Dimaggio Playground. 

BUDGET 

The artwork budget for the North Beach Branch is $75,000, which will cover all project costs 
including design, materials, engineering, fabrication, transportation, installation, lighting, 
acknowledgment plaque, artist's fee, and insurance. 

SELECTION PANEL 

The Branch Library Improvement Program Art Enrichment Master Plan calls for the creation of 
community panels for each of the participating branches. Each branch artist selection panel 
includes three community representatives (selected through a neighborhood election process), 
the branch manager, the branch architect, and an Arts Commissioner. 

ARTIST SELECTION PROCESS 

SFAC staff shall present to the artist selection panel the qualifications of approximately 15 to 20 
artists with experience creating work in media appropriate for the site from the Library Pre- 
Qualified Artist Candidate Pool and the 2009 Bay Area Artists Registry. SFAC staff will conduct 
outreach to artists residing in North Beach to solicit their applications to the 2009 Bay Area Artists 
Registry. After considering the artists' qualifications, the selection panel shall identify three 
finalists and one alternate who shall be invited to develop conceptual proposals after attending an 
orientation meeting with the project team and neighborhood residents. Each finalist shall be paid 
an honorarium of $500 for development of a conceptual design. 

The proposals shall be displayed in the community for written public comment prior to the final 
selection panel meeting. 

The Artist Selection Panel shall reconvene to consider the finalists' concepts in an interview 
format along with any community input and shall select one artist and an alternate for 
recommendation to the Arts Commission. 



TIMELINE 

Community Panelists Elected 

Deadline for 2009 Bay Area Artists Registry 

Selection Panel Meeting #1 (Select Finalists) 

VAC Approval of Finalists 

Finalist Orientation/Community Meeting 

Display of Proposals at a North Beach location 

Selection Panel Meeting #2 (Review Proposals) 

VAC Approval of Project Artist 

Artist under contract 

Library Construction Complete 



February 24, 2009 

March 23, 2009 

Early April 2009 

April 15, 2009 

Week of April 20, 2009 

Late May to early June 2009 

Mid-June 2009 

June 17, 2009 

July 2009 

Late 2011 



FURTHER INFORMATION 

Contact Jennifer Loworn, Public Art Project Manager at (415)252-4637 or by email at 
Jennifer.loworn@sfgov.org. 



February 18,2009 http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp?id=99847 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

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February 18, 2009 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, February 18, 2009 GOVERNMENT 

3:00 p.m. DOCUMENTS DEPT 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 

Minutes MAR - 2 2009 

Commissioners Present: 

Jeannene Przyblyski, Lorraine Garcia-Nakata, P.J. Johnston, Dede Wilsey SAN FRANCISCO 

Absent: Alexander Lloyd PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Staff Present: 

Mary Chou, Allison Cummings, Marcus Davies, Tonia Macneil, Jill Manton, Judy Moran, Susan 
Pontious 

Note: All votes are unanimous unless recorded otherwise. 
The meeting commenced at 3:03 p.m. 
1. Consent Calendar 

1. Motion to approve the following individuals as candidates for the Central Subway Chinatown 
Station Artist Selection Panel: Mona Tamari, Central Subway Architect, KwanHenmi; Luis 
Zurinaga, Consultant, San Francisco County Transportation Authority; Suzette Min, faculty, 
University of California, Davis; Hung Liu, artist, faculty, Mills College; Tan Chow, Senior 
Community Organizer, Chinatown Community Development Center; Hou Hanru, Director, SFAI 
Gallery; Abby Chen, Curator, Chinese Culture Center; Jay Xu, Director, Asian Art Museum; Jean 
Ma, faculty, Stanford University; Sue Lee, Executive Director, Chinese Historical Society of 
America; Judy Hu, Communications Manager, Chinese Historical Society of America; Kota Ezawa, 
artist, faculty, California College of the Arts ("CCA"); Rene de Guzman, Visual Art Director, 
Oakland Museum of California; Mark Johnson, Director, Gallery, San Francisco State University. 

2. Motion to approve the following individuals as candidates for the Central Subway Union 
Square/Market Street Station Artist Selection Panel: Mona Tamari, Central Subway Architect, 
Kwan Henmi; Luis Zurinaga, Consultant, San Francisco County Transportation Authority; 
Lawrence Rinder, Executive Director, Berkeley Art Museum; Margie Driscoll, Executive Director, 
American Institute of Architects; Jens Hoffman, Director, Wattis Gallery, CCA; Ellen Newman, 
Board Member, Union Square Association; Barbara Goldstein, Director, San Jose Public Art 
Program; Ellen Oh, Executive Director, Kearny Street Workshop; Amy Trachtenberg, artist; Kota 
Ezawa, artist, faculty, CCA; Stephanie Syjuco, artist; and Rene Green, artist, Dean of Graduate 
Studies, San Francisco Art Institute ("SFAI"). 

3. Motion to approve the following individuals as candidates for the Central Subway Moscone 
Station Artist Selection Panel: Mona Tamari, Central Subway Architect, Kwan Henmi; Luis 
Zurinaga, Consultant, San Francisco County Transportation Authority; Gary Garrels, Chief Curator, 
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art ("SFMoMA"); Julie Bishop, Associate Curator, SFMoMA; 
Betti-Sue Hertz, Visual Arts Curator, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts ("YBCA"); Charles Ward, 



2/27/2009 10:12 AM 



sfac: February 18,2009 http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp7icH)' 

Development Director, YBCA; Shiree Dyson, Director of Public Programs, Museum of the African 
Diaspora; Alleluia Panis, Executive Director, Kularts; Fred Wasserman, Deputy Director of 
Programs, Contemporary Jewish Museum; Jens Hoffman, Director, Wattis Gallery, CCA; Rene de 
Guzman, Visual Art Curator, Oakland Museum of California; Hou Hanru, Director, Gallery, SFAI. 

4. Motion to approve a mural by lead artist Josef Norris covering a retaining wall on Fell Street 
between Pierce and Steiner Streets in collaboration with Kids Serve Youth Murals and youth from 
Ida B. Wells High School. The mural will consist of mosaic tile birds created by high school 
students. 

5. Motion to authorize the Director of Cultural Affairs to take action, without a resolution of the 
full Commission, on the following items: Approve contracts or purchase orders with conservators, 
art technicians, or other qualified contractors for the purposes of performing conservation, 
maintenance and repair on works of art in the City's collection; and approve contracts with art 
service providers for the transport, installation and storage of artwork. 

Motion: To accept consent calendar items. 
Moved: Garcia-Nakata/Johnston 

2. Community Arts and Education Program Poster 

Melissa Hung, WritersCorps Program Associate, presented poster designs submitted by 
WritersCorps, a Community Arts and Education program, for display in the Market Street kiosks. 
Ms. Hung explained that the posters celebrate the fifthteenth anniversary of WritersCorps, and 
the artwork on the posters was created for the SFAC Gallery exhibition This Place Called Poetry, 
an interactive art project led by multimedia artist Katharine Gin and sound artist Kjell Nordeson. 
The artwork includes images of WritersCorps students with their poems; the posters were 
designed by Adrienne Aquino, who also worked on the design of the SFAC gallery exhibition. Ms. 
Hung explained that even though the gallery exhibition has ended, elements of the exhibition can 
still be accessed on the WritersCorps website. Commissioners stated that the posters look great 
and the poetry is wonderful. 

Jill Manton, Public Art Program Director, explained that this series of posters is not part of the Art 
on Market Street Program. She stated that MUNI wanted to make more visible its contribution to 
youth arts, and as a result, one of the annual three-month display slots for the posters in the 
Market Street kiosks is managed by the Community Arts and Education Program. 

Motion: Motion to approve a project of the Community Arts and Education Program for an 
exhibition in kiosks on Market Street of posters submitted by WritersCorps in March, 2009. 
Moved: Johnston, Garcia-Nakata 

3. Patricia's Green Temporary Sculpture 

Ms. Manton reported on a temporary sculpture proposal by Mark Baugh Sasaki to be placed in 
Patricia's Green from July 1, 2009 to January 1, 2010. The work is sponsored by the Hayes Valley 
Art Coalition ("HVAC"), which raises private funds to bring temporary art projects to Hayes Valley. 
She introduced Russell Pritchard, co-founder of HVAC and local store owner. Mr. Pritchard stated 
that the goal of HVAC is to collaborate with the Arts Commission to continue exhibiting art at 
Patricia's Green. He then introduced Mr. Baugh Sasaki, a local artist who received Community 
Challenge Grant. He stated that the artist's proposal is titled Adaptations and consists of three 
arches composed of steel and wood that range in height from 3 to 10 feet high and from 6 to 18 
feet long. Mr. Baugh Sasaki explained that his work explores the relationship between the built 



2 of 8 2/27/2009 10:12 



ic: February 18, 2009 http://www.sfgov.org/site/sfac_page.asp7icN99847 

and natural world using both natural and man-made materials. Mr. Pritchard stated that Mr. 
Baugh Sasaki will use tree trimmings and fallen trees in San Francisco for his sculpture. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that the work will have an interesting resonance in the 
neighborhood with its new architecture. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata asked how the wood in the 
proposed artwork would change during the length of the installation. Mr. Baugh Sasaki responded 
that the natural process of decay that would occur in the wood is a component of his work. 

Motion: Motion to approve the temporary installation of artwork by Mark Baugh Sasaki in 
Patricia's Green pending final permit approval from the Recreation and Park Department. 
Moved: Wilsey/Garcia-Nakata 

4. Broadway Streetscape 

Public Art Project Manager Tonia Macneil reported on the completion of the artwork Language of 
the Birds by Brian Goggin and Dorka Keehn. Ms. Macneil explained that she met with the text 
installation contractor and the artists to discuss the issue of inadequate contrast between the 
words and the paving. She reported that it was difficult to attribute fault to either the contractor 
or the artists for the installation of the correct shade of the microtop. Ms. Macneil explained that 
short of replacing the entire sidewalk, there was no viable method of correction. In any case, 
after the corrections made at the time of installation, the contrast between the microtop and the 
paving is actually better than on the approved mockup. She reported that the artists no longer 
desired to pursue the issue, so requested on-going maintenance of the sealant on the plaza as 
the best way to preserve the contrast. Ms. Macneil then stated that in reference to maintenance, 
there is a limited budget of $2,000, and she agreed with the artists to pay a technician $1,000 to 
clean and remove the graffiti and reseal the plaza. She stated that Mr. Goggin has made a verbal 
commitment to maintain the sidewalk according to the standards of the Arts Commission and the 
fabricator. She stated that she and Ms. Manton will set up a meeting with the Department of 
Public Works ("DPW") to determine the extent of the support they can provide. Ms. Macneil asked 
for approval of the artwork as installed in order to submit final payment to the artists. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that her problem was not so much with the execution of the 
paving as with the advisability of calling out the paving as a component of the artwork given the 
difficulty with maintenance. She expressed her concern about approving a paving project in one 
of the most heavily trafficked parts of the City, as well as in one of the neighborhoods with the 
most attentive group of stakeholders. Commissioner Przyblyski suggested talking to the artists 
about the possibility of considering the paving an ephemeral component of the artwork, with the 
overhead installation and lighting as the permanent component. Commissioner Johnston 
recommended accepting the final work as completed and then working with the artists and 
stakeholders to set up a maintenance fund, similar to the one proposed by the Friends of Lincoln 
Park for the artwork to be placed on Lincoln Steps. 

Ms. Manton stated that she will work with DPW to attempt to arrange for the care and cleaning of 
the paving with specific instructions from the Arts Commission. She reported that while the 
Collections Manager also has concerns about accepting a public sidewalk into the Collection, Luis 
Cancel, Director of Cultural Affairs, considers the paving as a part of the artwork. She explained 
that the Arts Commission will work with the artists, DPW, and other relevant parties to resolve 
the issue of maintenance and ownership. 

Commissioner Garcia-Nakata stated that she would like to approve the motion so that the artists 
could receive final payment, but is concerned that there is no solution to resolve the pavement 



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issue and does not want to set a precedent for future projects. Commissioner Johnston stated 
that he liked the piece and believes it will age reasonably well, but thinks the sidewalk remains 
an issue. 

Commissioners agreed to amend the motion to approve final payment and take action on the 
amended motion on the upcoming Full Commission. 

THIS MOTION WAS AMENDED AND POSTPONED. 

Motion: Motion to approve final payment to the artists for Language of the Birds, 2008, an 

installation made of concrete paves, UV rated Polycarbonate, silicon, stainless steel wire, LED 

lights, custom circuit boards, electronic light dimmer, electronic controller, and program card, by 

Brian Goggin and Dorka Keehn at the intersection of Broadway and Columbus Avenues in San 

Francisco. 

5. Art on Market Street Program 

Public Art Project Manager Judy Moran presented Kota Ezawa's Art on Market Street Program 
second proposal for the 2009/10 Kiosk Poster Projects. She reminded Commissioners that she 
presented Mr. Ezawa's first proposal, which was determined to be inappropriate for placement on 
Market Street, at a previous meeting and the Commissioners agreed to have Ms. Moran request a 
second proposal from Mr. Ezawa. Ms. Moran then presented images of the artist's past works and 
explained that he is an internationally-known Bay Area artist who is not in the City's Civic Art 
Collection. Ms. Moran explained that his photographically-sourced artwork focuses on recent 
American history and culture and uses iconic and powerful images from media and advertising. 
His work is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and included in the 
Whitney Biennial. 

Ms. Moran stated that Mr. Ezawa's new proposal is for poster designs that take text and imagery 
from advertisements along Market Street, as well as earlier Art on Market Street posters, to 
create new combinations of text and imagery. He refers to these posters as "mash-ups," a 
reference to music composition. Ms. Moran presented a preliminary sample with an advertisement 
image of a young couple juxtaposed with text from an Academy of Art advertisement, "Complete 
your bachelor's degree." 

Commissioner Przyblyski asked about the degree to which viewers along Market Street will 
understand the irony of the posters. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata stated that while the artist's 
intended meaning may come across clearly in the context of a museum or gallery, it might be 
more difficult to convey in the context of Market Street. Ms. Moran suggested including 
explanatory text at the bottom of the poster; Commissioner Przyblyski responded that it is the 
artist's obligation to create images that will work in the proposed setting and not require an 
explanation. Commissioner Johnston stated that the artist's intent could be to create ambiguous 
images. Ms. Moran stated that she agrees with Commissioners that Mr. Ezawa would have to pick 
the text and images carefully in order to engage people in a way that makes his intent clear. 
Commissioner Wilsey stated that this type of work requires a high level of sophistication from the 
artist. 

Motion: Motion to approve the proposal by artist Kota Ezawa for an Art on Market Street Kiosk 
Poster Project for the Art on Market Street 2009/10 Program, and to authorize the Director of 
Cultural Affairs to enter into contract with Kota Ezawa for the design and printing of 4 copies each 
of 6 original poster designs and a related public event for an amount not to exceed $17,000. 
Moved: Johnston/Wilsey 



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6. New Public Art Projects 

Tonia Macneil reported on a new Call for Artists titled the 2009 Bay Area Artists Registry. The 
applications received from this Call will be used for a number of upcoming projects including the 
Chinese Recreation Center, North Beach Branch Library, McCoppin Square, Mission Playground, 
and numerous streetscape and Recreation and Park Department projects. She explained that the 
project budgets range from $30,000 to $200,000 and the deadline for submitting applications on 
CaFE is March 23, 2009. 

She asked Commissioners to recommend artists who work in variety of a media for the registry; 
to suggest panelists to serve on the selection panels; and to serve as a panelist on the upcoming 
selection panels in April, May and June of 2009. She explained that the Arts Commission is 
looking for artists who may be new to the public art field and have interesting ways of 
approaching public art. Ms. Macneil agreed to send out an email to Commissioners with these 
various requests. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated the Arts Commission has had success with Commissioners serving 
on panels and offers Commissioners the opportunity to consider projects from different 
viewpoints. 

7. North Beach Branch Library 

Public Art Project Manager Jennifer Lovvorn reported on a new public art project at the North 
Beach Branch Library. She explained that the Library Commission and the Recreation and Park 
Department have proposed to locate the new library on the triangular lot across Mason Street 
from the existing library. The new building will have a triangular footprint with entrances on 
Columbus Avenue and Mason Street. The building design features vertical windows (referred to as 
"lanterns") which span a two story height on the building's three corners. Ms. Lovvorn and Ms. 
Moran met with the project architect to discuss art opportunities and identified two prominent 
sites for artwork: 1. Suspended sculpture in the two "lanterns" on the Columbus Avenue side of 
the building; and 2. Sculpture and/or glass artwork for the areas above the two entrances. She 
reported that there is an upcoming community meeting on February 24 and artist selection panels 
in April and June. She stated that the budget for the library artwork is $75,000. Ms. Manton 
explained that Mr. Cancel suggested that Commissioner Bihan serve on the panel because he is a 
North Beach resident and he has a particular interest in this project. Commissioner Przyblyski 
expressed her interest in commissioning a sculpture for the site as there have been several glass 
pieces and integrated works installed at other branch libraries. 

8. City Hall Commemorative Bust Guidelines 

Ms. Manton reported on comments and recommendations from the City Hall Preservation Advisory 
Commission regarding the draft of the City Hall Commemorative Bust Guidelines. She stated that 
the most important issue raised during the discussion was the specification of a designated 
mayoral zone. In earlier drafts, she specified the Mayor's Rotunda to be reserved for mayors' 
busts, but the Visual Arts Committee suggested a more broad and general approach to location. 
Ms. Manton explained that during the presentation to the City Hall Preservation Advisory 
Commission, the Commission recommended reserving the Mayor's Rotunda as well as the Carlton 
B. Goodlett lobby for the busts of mayors going forward. Ms. Manton explained that Collections 
Program Associate Marcus Davies identified 72 potential sites in the City Hall for busts, but due to 
special events needs and the concerns of the Facilities Management Department, the list was 
narrowed to 45 sites that will be identified as first and second tier. Ms. Manton requested 
feedback from Commissioners regarding the recommendations from the City Hall Preservation 



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Advisory Commission. 

Commissioner Johnston stated that the wiser course would be more flexibility in the guidelines. 
He stated that while it is logical to have a policy regarding the placement and design of busts in 
City Hall, he cautioned against identifying two areas specifically for mayors. Commissioner Wilsey 
agreed that the guidelines should be more general and Commissioner Przyblyski stated that while 
it is appropriate to identify potential sites for the placement of busts, territorializing the busts can 
be a dangerous proposition. Ms. Manton stated that she will forward Commissioners an updated 
version of the guidelines to be voted on during the March Visual Arts Committee meeting. 

9. Jay DeFeo Painting 

Ms. Manton reported on possible options for the placement of the Jay DeFeo painting Masquerade 
in Black. She explained that the painting is currently in storage at the de Young Museum where it 
was on view during the spring of 2008; previously the work was displayed in a plexiglass case at 
the San Francisco International Airport until the Airport began to convert its public spaces into 
retail stores. She explained that if the Arts Commission deaccessioned and sold the work, the 
funds would be returned to the art enrichment fund for the Airport. She stated that the work 
appraised three years ago for $275,000, but she believes it is worth more as other smaller 
paintings by Jay DeFeo have sold for more over the past year. She stated that in her previous 
communication with the DeFeo Estate, the Estate stated that an East Coast museum had 
expressed interest in the work but that the Visual Arts Committee directed staff to explore sales 
opportunities exclusively in the Bay Area. She explained that both she and Public Art Deputy 
Director Susan Pontious contacted various Bay Area museums but received no indication of 
interest in purchasing the work. She asked Commissioners if they would support having the 
DeFeo Estate further explore interest from East Coast museums. Ms. Manton stated. that she 
emailed Former Commissioner Larry Rinder, now Director of the Berkeley Art Museum ("BAM"), 
about his possible interest in acquiring the work but inquired if the price was flexible. 

Commissioner Przyblyski stated that we don't know that the work is undervalued at $275,000 and 
as Jay DeFeo is an important local artist, the work should remain in the Bay Area. She stated that 
if BAM came up with a reasonable offer, the work should remain in the Bay Area. Commission 
Wilsey stated that people on the East Coast may not fully understand or appreciate West Coast 
artists, and that the Arts Commission should make every effort to keep the work in the Bay Area, 
especially when one by such an iconic artist. Commissioner Wilsey agreed that if BAM makes a 
reasonable offer, the Arts Commission should accept it. 

Ms. Pontious stated her preference to keep the work in the Bay Area, especially if there is a 
commitment from the museum to display the work as it is a painting that rewards sustained 
attention. Commissioner Przyblyski suggested contacting Mr. Rinder to inform him that the ability 
to store the work at the de Young Museum is not infinite and that the Arts Commission is 
interested in selling the work to BAM at a reasonable price and within a reasonable timeframe. 

10. Promenade Ribbon Sculpture 

Ms. Manton reported on a proposal to modify the Promenade Ribbon Sculpture, a two-mile long 
linear sculpture designed in five-foot segments to accommodate potential changes along the 
Embarcadero. She stated that the sculpture has fallen into disrepair with the 288 skate blocks 
that were hacked off and the lighting component that does not work because the conduits have 
been eroded from the bay waters as well as accidentally cut. She reported that the Exploratorium 
is relocating to Piers 15/17 and in order to increase access, the Port has asked the Arts 
Commission to agree to have the raised elements in front of the new building removed. She also 



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reported that the Port is developing a new cruise terminal between Brannan Street and Pier 38 
and would like to flatten the raised elements along that section as well. Ms. Manton stated that 
she met with the artists who agreed to remove the raised sections of the sculpture, which would 
be performed at no cost to the Arts Commission. She also reported that in her discussions with 
the artists, Stanley Saitowtiz proposed greening the ribbon by de-electrifying it and using a 
phosphorescent paint that would absorb sunlight and glow at night. Ms. Manton stated that the 
Port agreed to cover the costs associated with the artists' time conducting design and research, 
and arranging a test on the segments between Piers 30 and 38; the estimated cost would be 
approximately $10,000. 

Commissioner Przyblyski welcomed the great news and Ms. Manton confirmed that there is no 
downside to conducting a test. Ms. Manton stated that she will draft a resolution for the March 
Visual Arts Committee meeting to remove the raised bollards and enter into agreement with the 
artists for their design and research of the proposed greening of the ribbon. 

11. Civic Center Plaza - Temporary Sculpture 

Ms. Manton reported that the installation by Patrick Dougherty on Civic Center Plaza is on 
schedule and coming along beautifully. She stated that there is a press tour on February 19th at 
10 am with the Mayor and the Director of Greening, who will also discuss plans to install planters, 
espresso bars, and seating at the plaza near the sculpture. Ms. Manton stated that Arts 
Commission staff has been answering questions and distributing information about the sculpture 
during lunchtime and the sculpture has attracted a lot of attention from the public; she stated 
that the Arts Commission will arrange for docent tours from 12 to 1 pm on one Tuesday each 
month throughout the length of the exhibition. Other upcoming events include a party for Mr. 
Dougherty, hosted by Commissioner Topher Delany at her studio on February 19th and a lecture 
by the artist on the evening of February 23rd. 

12. Public Utilities Commission ("PUC") Funding 

This item was postponed to the next Visual Arts Committee meeting. 

13. New Business 

Ms. Manton reported on possible options for the next Embarcadero Temporary Sculpture Display 
as the Louise Bourgeois sculpture will be deinstalled in April. Commissioner Przyblyski 
recommended displaying signage regarding the close of the exhibition. Ms. Manton then reported 
that she has been in contact with Gallery Paule Anglim regarding the installation of three 
sculptures of horses by Deborah Butterfield. She stated that the costs of transportation, 
installation, insurance, signage, and deinstallation are estimated to be between $20,000 and 
$30,000 and the bronze sculptures would be on display for a six-month period. She stated the 
Arts Commission would share the total cost of $30,000 equally with Gallery Paule Anglim. The 
Commissioners were enthusiastic about the proposal and Commissioner Przyblyski supported the 
partnership between the Arts Commission and Gallery Paule Anglim. Commissioner Przyblyski 
stated that while Hayes Green is a dedicated spot for local artists, the Embarcadero and Civic 
Center Plaza are locations for showcasing artists with international reputations. Commissioner 
Przyblyski asked if the Port wanted the selection of artists to be a public process and Ms. Manton 
responded that the Port supports recommendations of artists from the Arts Commission. Ms. 
Manton stated that installation of the Butterfield sculpture would probably take place in May 
2009. She also mentioned the possibility of borrowing sculptures by Mark di Suvero for public 
display in the City. 

Collections Manager Allison Cummings reported on the relocation of the Beniamo Bufano sculpture 



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at San Francisco General Hospital. She stated the sculpture was successfully moved about one 
block from its original location into a garden setting. She stated that the Gerald Walburg 
sculpture at General Hospital has some issues with the welding and may need to be moved to the 
Atthowe studio and rewelded for safety. 

Ms. Pontious stated that the Recreation and Park Department has recently laid off staff at the 
Beach Chalet Visitor Center, which has some very valuable WPA frescoes by Lucien Labaudt in the 
ground floor lobby that were restored in 1988. She expressed concern that the area is now 
unguarded and the murals may be vandalized. Commissioner Johnston stated that he frequents 
the Beach Chalet and has seen minimal staffing on the lower level in the past two years. Ms. 
Pontious stated that she is planning to contact the Recreation and Park Department to inquire 
about their plan to protect the murals. Commissioner Johnston suggested that Ms. Pontious work 
with the owner of the Beach Chalet Brewery and Restaurant because patrons of the restaurant 
need to pass by the murals in order to enter the restaurant, and the owner will be interested in 
keeping the area well-maintained. Commissioner Garcia-Nakata agreed. Commissioner Przyblyski 
agreed that the Recreation and Park Department would also have an interest in keeping the area 
clean and well-maintained. 

14. Old Business 

There was no old business to report. 

15. Adjournment 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:47 pm. 



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San Francisco Arts Commission 

LISTEN 
TEXT ONLY 
PRINT 
A 

* a 17-0 c : : 

A 

March 18, 2009 GOVERNMENT 

■».9r VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE DOCUMENTS DEPT 

Wednesday, March 18, 2009 

ftr/of 3:00 p.m. MAR 1 7 2009 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 70 

Agenda SAN FRANCISCO 



1. Consent Calendar 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



1. Motion to approve a mural by lead artists Dan Anh Nguyen and Dana Irving in collaboration 
with VVBOOM (Visitacion Valley Business Opportunities and Outreach to Merchants) covering the 
exterior wall at 91 Leland Avenue with funding provided by a San Francisco Community Challenge 
grant, pending evidence of community support. 

2. Motion to approve the selection panel pool for the Chinese Recreation Center Artist Selection 
Panel: Abby Chen, Program Director, Chinese Cultural Center; Hilda Shum, Artist; Sabina Chen, 
Former Director, Chinese Culture Center; Francis Wong, Deputy Director, Chinese Historical 
Society; Judy Hu, Communications Manager, Chinese Historical Society; Mona Shah, Interim 
Director, Oakland Asian Cultural Center; Rene De Guzman, Senior Curator, Oakland Museum of 
California; Michael Almaguer, Artist, Educator; Susan Schwartzenberg, Artist; Kevin Chen, 
Program Director, Intersection for the Arts; Ellen Oh, Director of the Kearny Street Workshop; 
and Hou Hanru, Director of Public Programs, San Francisco Art Institute. 

2. SOMA West Phase II Improvements Project 

Tonia Macneil 

Report on the public art project plan for two sites in the SOMA West Project Area. 

Motion: Motion to approve the Public Art plan for the SOMA West Improvements Project pending 
community response. 

3. Laguna Honda Hospital 

Susan Pontious 

Report on the completion and installation of four tapestries at Laguna Honda Hospital by artist 

Lewis deSoto. 

Motion: Motion to approve and accept into the Civic Art